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Bike Theft Task Force officers host ride-along on the Springwater Corridor

Posted by on August 1st, 2016 at 2:02 pm

Officers Dave Sanders (right) and Ben Labasan on the Springwater Path Saturday.(Photos: Portland Police Bureau)

PPB Officers Dave Sanders (right) and Ben Labasan on the Springwater Path Saturday.
(Photos: Portland Police Bureau)

Leaders of the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force did a ride-along on the Springwater Corridor path on Saturday.

The ride was a spontaneous event that founder of the Task Force, PPB Officer Dave Sanders, posted to Twitter just a few hours before he set out. He was joined by fellow Officer Ben Labasan and the two of them were joined by a handful of citizens who showed up to ride with them. It was all part of the Bike Theft Task Force’s ongoing effort to involve the community in the work they are doing to prevent bike theft and recover stolen bikes.

Why the Springwater? “I’ve been wanting to see the issues along the Springwater firsthand and have been wanting to address some of the ongoing tips and complaints that we have received regarding bike theft in this area,” Ofcr Sanders said via email this morning.

Here’s more from Sanders:

My hope was to allow the community to be involved in navigating some of their concerns/problems that present themselves along the corridor. I wanted to be able to listen to these concerns on a deeper level and to allow the community see first-hand how we follow up on these bike-theft related complaints and the challenges that we are sometimes faced with. Some folks who offer up these bike theft tips/complaints sometimes feel that these go into a black hole and are not addressed, so I wanted to encourage the public that we do take these seriously and address them as we are able. I believe that the community’s involvement in stopping bike theft is crucial and we are never going to get a handle on it if we can’t come together on this as a larger community.

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Recovered bike found along the Springwater path.

Recovered bike found along the Springwater path.

bttf-bikeframepile

The officers found lots of parts, but didn't see any high-end or complete bikes.

The officers found lots of parts, but didn’t see any high-end, complete bikes.

Beyond the community-building, the ride led to results. Within a few hours the officers recovered a nice new Public road bike. Sanders and Labasan were excited to recover that bike, but wish they could have run serial numbers on the “hundreds” of other bikes that looked suspicious. “We weren’t able to address many of the bikes we saw,” he wrote, “but tried to follow up on the ones that we thought may be reported/registered and were in decent condition.” Sanders said there was one trove of bikes in particular that he wanted to check out but was unable to due to a “very aggressive dog” that was guarding the area.

While he was dismayed at the conditions he saw along the path, Sanders was encouraged to see so many people out riding. “We received dozens of positive comments on Saturday and many expressed appreciation for being out on the trail,” he wrote. “I wish we could be out there riding every day. I can say, after riding the trail, I understand more deeply the legitimate concerns that are presented by the community around the corridor, and hope that we can continue to address those better.”

Stay tuned for future opportunities to join Sanders and other Portland Police officers on a bike ride. Learn more about the Bike Theft Task Force by following them on Twitter @PPBBikeTheft and on the web at PortlandOregon.gov.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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dan
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dan

Thanks, Bike Theft Task Force! If there were BTTF jerseys or some other way to directly support/contribute to your work, I would be interested — are there any opportunities like that?

Josh Chernoff
Guest
Josh Chernoff

I want to organize a group of people to post out at the trail heads and monitor the bikes going in/out. Its way more safer then getting into the camps and can aid at triangulating stollen bikes. I have walkie talkies and a couple means of surveying bikes as they pass. If there are any takers I want to doe this pairs per group for safety concerns.

BB
Guest
BB

The take away I get from this is that as long as there is an aggressive looking dog present, one can get away with crimes in the presence of the police.

still riding after all that
Guest
still riding after all that

“Sanders said there was one trove of bikes in particular that he wanted to check out but was unable to due to a ‘very aggressive dog’ that was guarding the area.”

The *POLICE* are afraid to enter an area filled with likely stolen property because it’s guarded by a dog? I guess they get the same “we don’t care” attitude from Animal Control that I got when I called to report being attacked and cornered by 2 large dogs. Something is very wrong here.

Bjorn
Guest
Bjorn

Just a note that today could have been the day we saw the trail cleared of aggressive dogs as well as aggressive people if Hales had an ounce of follow through. Instead we’ve got another month of violence, garbage, pollution and chop shops operating openly along the MUP.

J_R
Guest
J_R

I’d really like to see the mayor and the four city commissioners visit the corridor. Preferably alone or at least incognito without a horde of staffers and the media.

KristenT
Guest
KristenT

Sounds like the PPB and associated cities that the Springwater runs through need to mount a bike patrol and ride through here as visibly as possible, as often as possible– not just once in a while, or in conjunction with a big event like Hood To Coast in a couple of weeks.

Todd Boulanger
Guest
Todd Boulanger

Perhaps the next Policy Makers Ride will include a portion of the Springwater Path…as part of the inspection of the “good, bad and the ugly”…not for design issues but for post project operations.

Todd Boulanger
Guest
Todd Boulanger

Backstory for new readers:
The Policy Makers Ride is an annual [well] organized bike ride of elected officials, bikeway design professionals, and local bike advocates visiting proposed or completed bikeways as a way of group education, building support for future regional connections and building networking. Typically such rides have not focused on facility “security/ safety” issues but when these concerns rise to where the Springwater is now [when all but the A+ riders feel safe using it 24/7] then it is similar to a high speed roadway with a subpar/ outdated design or missing network link/ barrier.

SE
Guest
SE

What do we consider “Springwater” ?? I regularly ride SW from 122nd to Ochocco and do not recognize the area in that lead pic (PPB Officers Dave Sanders (right) and Ben Labasan on the Springwater Path Saturday.)
Just rode SW today. Saw NO Police presence.

Did see the remnants of departed campers (garbage & dead grass) , lots of bike parts. shopping carts , garbage , entrenched homeless campers, garbage , poop ..oh, and did I mention GARBAGE ?

last week saw a large Latino resident pushing a LightSpeed titanium road bike down the MUP. No way was it legally his. Oh, and a large deluxe BBQ that they’d liberated somewhere ..with a FOR SALE sign on it . 🙁

IMHO..CH is going to keep kicking the can down the road as a gift to Wheeler.

kittens
Guest
kittens

meow meow meow meow meow

Ted Timmons (Contributor)
Editor

I’m annoyed (at myself) that I didn’t see this. Would have loved to go.

KristenT
Guest
KristenT

My brother and I are also running HTC. He volunteered to run the first Springwater leg, which should hopefully be in the daytime. Even though the HTC organizers have promised extra patrols, I’m a little leery of any of our teammates being on the trail.

I had also heard that the HTC organizers were considering re-routing the event to stay off the Springwater because of the homeless camps and aggressive campers.

Lance P
Guest
Lance P

On Sunday, while riding home, I saw a short woman and man steal a soma bike and ride up the burnside bridge heading east. The Soma was black. I took a video of the bike and person and was hoping to hear someone ask here on bike portland. If you recently had your Soma bike stolen downtown, let me know and I can pass on the video for whatever good it may do.

Paul H
Guest
Paul H

If the current situation doesn’t improve and I were faced with an election choice for a bond for a new recreational corridor in Portland, I’d probably vote against it.

I would vote for a well conceived bond or tax specifically to deal with housing and homelessness, but not for a project that promises to be one thing (recreation, transportation) but is in reality something else (a horrible housing situation).

And I say that as someone who commutes along Springwater 170 to 180 days every year.

SE
Guest
SE

Spiffy
to me it looks like where it comes from Oak’s Park and is about to cross the road by Sellwood Park and then go up into Sellwood proper… you don’t continue this far on your ride…
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maybe they should ride the stretch from 82nd to 111th where the chop shops are ?

Homeowner regrets letting campers live in backyard
http://koin.com/2016/08/03/homeowner-regrets-letting-campers-live-in-backyard/

Edward
Guest
Edward

I’d like to know what the “Bike Theft Task Force” actually is. It’s a great name, and it looks like they (whoever “they” might be) are doing some cool stuff. Bike lock publicity and give away? Super cool. An outting ride-along to check out visible chop shops … also a good thing.

But most other public / government focus projects have a clear genesis and mandate and organizing documents, principles, and opportunities for public input and participation.

Right now it looks like this “Task Force” is basically these two officers and whatever it is they choose to do on a particular day (which is still better than nothing). But public participation can harness more power and more ideas.

Is there a non-profit 501(C)(3) set up to accept donations and direct cash flow? The bike lock give away is so cool, but a lot of people I talked to would be willing to purchase a lock (at the give away) plus make a donation to the give away fund.

I don’t want action to get bogged down in portland-process, but there is an advantage to harnessing public involvement (beyond announcinthg things on the Twitter).

SE
Guest
SE

‘Hood To Coast’ to avoid Springwater Corridor

http://koin.com/2016/08/04/hood-to-coast-to-avoid-springwater-corridor/