Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

Legislator says effort to improve 82nd Avenue is ‘really picking up steam’

Posted by on June 17th, 2014 at 5:05 pm

Mayor Adams at Safe Routes to School ride-22

State Sen. Michael Dembrow, right, at a Safe Routes
to School ride with state Rep. Lew Frederick in 2010.
(Photo J.Maus/BikePortland)

Saying that a window of opportunity is opening for the Oregon Department of Transportation to make Portland’s 82nd Avenue a better place, State Sen. Michael Dembrow is urging people to attend two events this summer.

“I’ve been working on various issues related to 82nd since I was first elected, and now a path to addressing these issues in a more comprehensive way is opening up.,” Dembrow wrote in an email this week. “Neighborhood leaders have convened a group to bring together businesses and community leaders, neighbors and neighborhood associations to create a unified voice for change along 82nd Ave. The 82nd Ave. Improvement Coalition has been meeting regularly since the beginning of this year, and I’ve been able to attend several of their meetings. Things are now really picking up steam.”

Dembrow invites interested residents to attend the 82nd Avenue Improvement Coalition’s next meeting on Monday, June 23rd, at 7 p.m. at the Central Northeast Neighbors office, 4415 NE 87th Ave. It’ll include a 45-minute “community values workshop.”

Advertisement

“ODOT has identified some money to conduct a study of potential options for improving 82nd Ave., but they need broad community participation in order to make this process a success,” Dembrow writes. “While the planning process won’t begin in earnest until early 2015, ODOT will be collecting feedback starting now to help guide and inform the scope of the planning. It’s really important that neighbors weigh in.”

The second event Dembrow mentions in his email is his own sixth annual “town hall on two wheels,” which this year will be Saturday, July 26 at 10 a.m. at the Lumberyard Indoor Bike Park, 2700 NE 82nd Ave.

“This year’s ride will feature a number of stops focusing on 82nd Ave., and it will be a unique way for us to look at the corridor, since most of us usually experience 82nd Ave. at 35 mph in our car,” Dembrow writes. “(Don’t worry, we won’t be biking on 82nd itself.)”

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

39
Leave a Reply

avatar
16 Comment threads
23 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
20 Comment authors
Craig HarlowpaikialaMichael Andersen (News Editor)Woodstockiandavemess Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Carl
Guest
Carl

“Don’t worry, we won’t be biking on 82nd itself.”

Because that would be ludicrous.

Allan
Guest
Allan

No real substance on what might be done to ‘improve’ the street

Bjorn
Guest
Bjorn

I can’t wait to see the new walls that ODOT will build on 82nd.

John Mulvey
Guest
John Mulvey

Allan
No real substance on what might be done to ‘improve’ the street

That’s what the meeting’s for, isn’t it?

It sounds like you’d prefer that they make up their mind on what they want to do, and then have some meetings to sell it to the public?

ed
Guest
ed

Great to see potential progress here, but yes kind of sad (if understandable) to have a two wheel town hall where the focus of the meeting is a street where it must be prefaced with: “Don’t worry, we won’t be biking on 82nd itself” 😉

If heretofore impregnable fortresses of car culture such as Foster Ave can change though as appears immanent, perhaps redeeming 82nd isn’t such an impossible dream and I’m encouraged – so kudos to Sen. Denbrow.

Suburban
Guest
Suburban

Please! It’s “82nd ave, Avenue of Roses” or “Oregon Route 213” and there are plenty worse roads to ride. OR 213 has good sight lines, lots of family friendly hang outs, multiculturalisms, modern pavement, some side walks, schools, parks, quaint stores selling colorful imported things. You will be honked at.

JEFF BERNARDS
Guest
JEFF BERNARDS

They should just attempt to rebuild and repave, that’s the obvious fix that doesn’t need a meeting. JUST DO IT!

jim
Guest
jim

Who would ever want to ride on 82nd?

TOM
Guest
TOM

I don’t like it, but my solution to riding 82nd so far is ,,sidewalks
(and many times they suck too) … usually just divert over to 205 MUP. (which can be some distance from 82nd, in places)

Spiffy
Guest
Spiffy

I’ve ridden on 82nd numerous times when I used to work near Clackamas Town Center… it’s not that bad… you’ve got your own lane so most people don’t pass too close…

probably not as fun in NE where there are lots of big hills…

TOM
Guest
TOM

paikiala
You must be thinking 92nd, because 82nd doesn’t have bike lanes.
Recommended 0

NOT entirely correct.

82nd has OK lanes from CTC to King Rd.

TOM
Guest
TOM

paikiala
Structures are built within 7 to 10 feet of the curb. .
Recommended 1

I know of 2 structures (just North of Johnson Creek Blvd – Fred Meyer) that come within 3 feet of the curb. Only 1 person can walk those passages at a time.

1 is a bar/club/tavern on the West side of 82nd.

John Mulvey
Guest
John Mulvey

Derailleur

your little crew on Foster!

If by my “little crew” you mean the vast majority of people who live, work and own businesses in the area, then yes –it IS starting to work out.

John Mulvey
Guest
John Mulvey

The truth is a great sales pitch.

Craig Harlow
Guest
Craig Harlow
paikiala
Guest
paikiala

Traditionally, Portland, like other jurisdictions, does not want to assume authority for a state highway in their jurisdiction until it is improved, or unless it comes with the funding to make such improvements. The State doesn’t usually have the money, and is unlikely to spend large sums frequently on a single part of the state, which is what might be needed for transfers to Portland, so we wait.
I think this is short sighted. Transfer of Barbur to Portland could result in a road diet and buffered bike lanes by the end of the year. The Concord/Fenwick greenway crossing at Lombard was held up for similar reasons (money/design standards).