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PBOT needs your local knowledge for two key northeast Portland projects

Posted by on November 13th, 2020 at 3:00 pm

PBOT’s proposal for the 70s Greenway would create a carfree lane through Rose City Golf Course.

Are you an expert on the North Tabor, Montavilla, or Madison South neighborhoods? If so, the Portland Bureau of Transportation needs your help designing two key projects: the 70s Neighborhood Greenway and the Halsey Street Safety and Access to Transit Project.

The $4.5 million 70s Neighborhood Greenway Project aims to create a five mile low-stress cycling route between SE Flavel and NE Sacramento. It would be a valuable north-south connection parallel to 82nd Avenue. Since we last checked in on the project in summer 2018, PBOT has done a lot of planning and design work and is on track to break ground in next summer.

The 70s Greenway will have all the greenway bells and whistles we’ve come to expect from PBOT like curb extensions, median islands, and flashing beacons to make intersections safer — and new off-streets paths and protected bike lanes to make cycling better.

Beyond the usual, PBOT has some special features they’d like to build. One of them is a fully carfree lane through Rose City Golf Course. The current proposal (see below) is to limit NE 72nd Avenue between Tillamook and Sacramento to one-way (southbound) for car and truck drivers. The eastern lane would become carfree.

Another significant element is a major crossing update of SE Foster at 78th that would include a two-way “cycle-track connection” across the off-set intersection.

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PBOT is also working on major updates to NE Halsey between 68th and 92nd with an eye toward making it easier to walk and bike to the 82nd Avenue MAX station. The Halsey Safety and Access to Transit Project includes several significant changes.

PBOT wants to add buffered bike lanes where no cycling space exists today on Halsey between 70th and 80th…

The project would also reconfigure the 68th and Halsey intersection…

Another part of the proposal is a roundabout at the Halsey/80th/81st intersection…

And check out their plans for a two-way protected bike path on the Halsey Street overcrossing of I-84 Avenue…

Going further east toward 92nd, PBOT wants to create space for cycling along Halsey. These are just some of the project elements. I haven’t even mentioned new sidewalks, new streetlights, and transit improvements!

Neighborhood resident Eric P shared his comments about these projects in the BP Forums. He’s excited about these proposals and he wants more people to join in him taking the survey PBOT just launched today. He reports Nextdoor is already buzzing about the potential carfree lane through the golf course. Eric P is also worried about how the greenway proposal jogs so much north of Glisan. “They want to send the greenway down a narrow, dark alley-like street on Pacific between 76th & 77th,” he report. “It would be great if this greenway stayed closer to businesses on 82nd and connected more directly to the 82nd MAX hub.” He also worried about people driving carelessly through the roundabout.

I agree with Eric that if you want to make these plans better — or want to tell PBOT how much you like the designs, please take a few minutes for the survey. This is the stage in the project where PBOT is dreaming a bit and flying some trial balloons to gauge community interest. To make this stuff a reality they’ll need to know where you stand.

Here are those links again:
70s Greenway
Halsey Street Project
Survey for both

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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maccoinnich
Subscriber

One day I’d love to understand why PBOT loves proposing roundabouts in locations where there isn’t enough space for a roundabout. It appears that the intent here is to route people on bikes onto the sidewalk at the south side of Halsey…?

Matt
Guest
Matt

NE 72nd is just fine as it is. Leave it alone.

maccoinnich
Subscriber

It’s also maddening that PBOT has a project to add bike lanes on Halsey from 68th east, but a separate project to repave the street between 47th and 62nd won’t add bike lanes to Halsey. When I emailed PBOT staff about this last year to ask why they decided not to follow the 2030 Bicycle Master Plan the response was that a) people can just use the greenway on NE Tillamook and b) there’s a six block gap between the projects (as if that’s an insurmountable problem).

squareman
Subscriber

And check out their plans for a two-way protected bike path on the Halsey Street overcrossing of I-84 Avenue…

I wouldn’t call plastic wands “protected”. Separated, yes. But that separation is like paper and less of a barrier than a high curb to a guy in an SUV choking on his cola – yes, that’s a reference to the Burnside Bridge incident from three years ago.

Eawriste
Guest
Eawriste

Just finished the survey and was sort of shocked at the poor quality of the design. For example, there was a section of 2-way cycletrack with a 2 foot painted buffer and 4 car lanes (one parking). That would mean cars and bikes passing within 2 feet going opposite directions without grade separation. My guess is that PBOT is retaining the capacity, speed and parking and sacrificing basic safety. Kind of speechless at how incompetent this design is.

David Hampsten
Guest
David Hampsten

I’m surprised PBOT didn’t put in a second traffic circle at 68th & Halsey, a twin of the one at 81st. Double-roundabouts have a proven ability to slow overall traffic, especially when there are trees or public art in the center of both.

David Hampsten
Guest
David Hampsten

Where’s the 1% for public art on these plans?

John Mulvey
Guest
John Mulvey

ODOT loves the 70s bikeway project because they intend to use it to justify their future refusal to put bike facilities on 82nd Avenue.

John Liu
Guest
John Liu

It has been a while since I rode through the golf course, and I’ve never driven there. My question though, would we need auto access through the golf course at all? Traffic trying to cut through the golf course could divert around it. Traffic trying to get to the clubhouse can access it from the southern Tillamook entrance to the golf course, without needing to go through.

Let's Active
Guest
Let's Active

Regarding the Halsey crossing treatment over I-84, you say: “And check out their plans for a two-way protected bike path on the Halsey Street overcrossing of I-84 Avenue…” And you show a graphic of wands separating the path. Do wands really count as creating protection? is that the standard? It’s an honest question. I do not feel that wands provide me much protection through the Lloyd District, for example. Hard curbs would be protection in my opinion.

Paul Cone
Guest
Paul Cone

I live on 76th just off Burnside and I go north and south regularly. I don’t understand why there is focus on the crossings at Stark and Washington but no mention at all of how the crossing at Halsey will work. To me that is the one that is the most unsafe and in need of improvement. You are crossing four lanes of traffic, which can be done fairly easily going northbound via the signal on 74th, but the signal doesn’t control traffic southbound — you have to either wait for a gap in traffic, or ride your bike eastbound on the sidewalk to hit the ped crossing button. And the four car traffic lanes on Halsey make it like a freeway.

EP
Guest
EP

I don’t get the route north of Glisan. I get that they wanted it to shift over from the crossing at 80th & Glisan to the proposed one at 76th & Halsey. But all the turns are what can make bike routes a pain. Along the way, there is the narrow/sketchy in the dark “alley” that is NE Pacific between 77th & 76th. Then there’s the offset/jog at 76th and Multnomah, which is uncontrolled and has bad sight lines and often speeding cars. My vote would be to keep the route on 80th, straight up to Halsey. Give the greenway on 80th a better treatment/priority at the roundabout with a diverter or bumpout. Then it could better connect to the Halsey bike lanes both across Halsey (westbound) and headed east on the overpass.