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Final Day at Interbike: Notes from the floor, Part Two

Posted by on September 25th, 2010 at 1:16 am

Interbike Day Three-20

The Tune Bug.
(Photos © J. Maus)

As promised, here are more notes and photos from Interbike…

If you’re concerned about the safety of wearing headphones or earbuds while biking, you’ll be glad to hear about the Tune Bug. This little device turns your helmet into a speaker by using a “surface exciter” that vibrates the surface. You just attach it to the outside of your helmet and it can communicate via Bluetooth or an audio cable to your MP3 device. Retail price is $99.

Most of you are probably familiar with tag-along bikes, but the i-Go from Weehoo Inc. is something totally different. It’s more like a tag-along recumbent. The company rep told me they see tag-alongs as 15 year old technology and that, “It’s time to catch tag-alongs up to the modern times.” With the lower center of gravity, the product won’t pull you side-to-side like some tag-alongs do and the child is also free to relax. The reclined riding position also gives kids more power to pedal… and if they don’t want to, they can take a nap or just chill out and watch the world go by (it’s “meltdown free riding” says the guy from WeeHoo).

Timbuk2 at Interbike

Venerable bag company Timbuk2 unveiled an interesting new waterproof bike pannier set dubbed the “Tandem”. The bags are waterproof thanks to Tarpaulin fabric and they come as a pair that drapes over a rear rack. There are little magnets embedded near the top of the bags to help it keep from slipping off your rack and to make the two bags snap together when you lift it off. Far from tour-ready, these bags are made for commuters who want something they can quickly grab and take with them. Retail price is $110.

Timbuk2 at Interbike

Interbike Day Three-36


Bionx at Interbike

The Bionx kit.

Bionx is a Quebec-based company that makes what many consider to be the best electric assist technology on the market (Trek specs Bionx on some of their new bikes). Available in three different kits with varying motor sizes, this is primarily a “pedelec” system — which means it offers a power boost proportional to your pedaling as opposed to an on-demand, throttle induced boost. The Bionx system provides a range of assistance from 35-300% of your power output. The Bionx system is distributed by Quality Bicycle Products and kit prices range from $1,700 to $1,950.

Civia, a commuting bike and accessory brand owned by Quality Bicycle Products, has come a long way since hitting the market with just one model (the Hyland) back in 2008. Now they’ve expanded to eight models and added a range of handlebars, forks, fenders, and even clothing to their line-up. Civia unveiled several new bikes at Interbike, including the Halsted cycle truck, and the Kingfield and Prospect drop-bar commuter bikes.

Civia at Interbike

The Kingfield commuter.
Civia at Interbike

Civia Knickers ($130)


Yepp child seats from Holland are something you’ll definitely be seeing around Portland soon. This distinctive looking seat is made out of a soft but sturdy foam material which should be easier to clean and more comfortable than plastic seats with fabric inserts. The Yepp Mini ($140) is for kids weighing up to 30 pounds and it attaches via a quick release behind your stem. The Yepp Maxi ($170) attaches to a rear rack and can carry kids up to 49 pounds. Another cool thing about these seats is that you can swap them between bikes thanks to their quick release attachment systems.

Ergon's new pedal

The PC2 pedal.

Ergon is a German company that sprung onto the scene several years ago with their signature handlebar grips. They’ve made a name for themselves by designing very comfortable and well thought-out accessories. At Interbike they debuted the PC2 pedal. For a flat pedal that’s made for everyday riding, it sure got a lot of attention at the show. What’s cool about it is the concave profile which forces the ball of your foot to be centered on the pedal spindle (instead of pedaling with your toes or with your heels). The other nifty feature is the large bed of grip tape that prevents your foot from slipping. This could be the ultimate commuting pedal in the wet Northwest. Retail price is around $70 and it’s expected to be available in May or June.

— See all our Interbike 2010 coverage here.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are productive, considerate, and welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

11 Comments
  • Avatar
    FauxPorteur September 25, 2010 at 10:15 am

    While the iGo recumbent style tag-along is an interesting design, I feel bad for the children that will be getting road spray shot directly into their faces at high velocity. Even with full coverage fenders there’s still going to be a lot of moisture/grime making it the 18″ up into the kid’s face.

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    Anne Hawley September 25, 2010 at 11:29 am

    The Tunebug might actually get me to wear a helmet.

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    Dave September 25, 2010 at 7:05 pm

    We love the Weehoo! We rented it on vacation. We did not have any issue with “road spray”.
    I ended up buying one from Clever Cycles when we got home.

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    Ted Buehler September 25, 2010 at 10:26 pm

    Like the Weehoo and the PC2. Definitely need better pedals for ordinary riders.

    Thanks for the info,
    Ted Buehler

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    Michael M. September 26, 2010 at 11:00 am

    Recumbents vs e-bikes vs roadies vs commuters vs cross…

    Monty Python’s Life of Brian:

    Brian: Excuse me, are you the Judean People’s Front?
    Reg: F**k off! We’re the People’s Front of Judea.

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    DenverCX September 26, 2010 at 11:06 am

    *laughing* #7

    Apropos!

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    Paul September 26, 2010 at 8:24 pm

    Splinter!

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    Spiffy September 27, 2010 at 10:09 am

    they’re still developing rear rack child seats? I’ve seen a couple in use and they’ve convinced me never to use one… way too harsh on the child…

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    Jessica Roberts September 27, 2010 at 10:15 am

    I saw a kid in an i-Go yesterday on Sunday Parkways and he looked super happy and comfortable. Didn’t seem to be any bigger/longer than a regular trail-a-bike, either.

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    craig September 28, 2010 at 11:10 am

    Jonathan, that Lazer helmet you depicted in your earlier article, I cannot find on either of the manufacturer’s websites nor even any other images of that same helmet anywhere on the web. Did you bring home a brochure or something that identifies the model of the helmet more specifically? Or was it a not-yet-production concept piece?

    http://www.lazerhelmets.com
    http://www.lazersport.com

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    Jeff September 28, 2010 at 4:21 pm

    Hi Jonathan,

    If anyone is interested in trying the Weehoo, Waterfront Bicycles rents and sells the Weehoo. We have rented the i-go all summer with great success.

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