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The Monday Roundup: ‘Petro-masculinity’, prostate health, deadly e-bikes, and more

Posted by on November 9th, 2020 at 9:17 am

Welcome to the week. Here are the most notable items we came across in the past seven days…

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You should care about down there: It is a fact that for men, cycling impacts prostate health outcomes. Should you be concerned? This article from Road.cc is a good primer on the topic.

Austin, the new Portland?: While Portlanders argued and ultimately failed to pass new funding for biking and walking infrastructure, Austin voters greenlighted $460 million and could be on its way to overtaking us as America’s best cycling city.

Trucks and guns: Noted legal and car culture expert Greg Shill makes the case that vehicular assaults are popular because they are a legal way to harass and intimidate that are much less likely than guns to attract enforcement attention.

Fossil fuel culture: Virginia Tech researcher Cara Daggett has coined the term “petro-masculinity” to help us understand why big trucks and fossil fuel extraction are so closely intertwined with the conservative belief system of American men.

E-bike safety: Dutch authorities are likely to implement technology that would automatically reduce power to e-bike motors in dense residential areas due to a rise in deaths from crashes.

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Protest planning: Portland’s progressive planning is part and parcel to our proclivity for protesting, says local urbanism expert Jarrett Walker.

Rust belt road safety: Pittsburgh is looking more like Portland as traffic calming measures like plastic wands and narrower streets are integrated into street projects.

Ironclad promise: Road safety and mobility justice groups in Mexico have achieved the extraordinary: a constitutional amendment that includes the passage, “Every person has the right to mobility under conditions of safety, accessibility, efficiency, sustainability, quality, inclusion and equality.”

Black People Ride Bikes: A bike club in Baltimore is helping sustain the pandemic bike boom by creating a welcoming space for Black people who love to ride.

Overcoming obstacles: It’s not just a lack of good infrastructure or fear of drivers that keep people off their bikes. Streetsblog highlighted a series of interviews with people who ride despite disabilities and discrimination.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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Zach
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Zach

Great news about Mexico. Mexico City’s car culture and street design makes LA look like Copenhagen.

SD
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SD

“E-bike safety” article.
– Now do cars and trucks.

David Hampsten
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David Hampsten

I’ve never seen a major US city as hilly as Pittsburgh – it makes Seattle and San Francisco look flat. Most of its residential streets are narrower than Portland’s (which are themselves rather narrow), so they really need the traffic calming.

Downtown protected bike lane on Penn Street.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.443775,-79.9982456,3a,75y,90h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sf7juO82-1tEx3MDCCyj62Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!5m1!1e3

Middle of the Road Guy
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Middle of the Road Guy

There are a good number of women that drive trucks…what is the name for them?

PS
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PS

Austin segregated the active transit piece as a separate proposition and funded it from general obligation bonds on an uncrowded ballot. Doesn’t take a transit activist or political guru to see why that one passed and ours didn’t.

Tim
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Tim

Oversized trucks, guns, and attitudes are not petro-masculine or any other form of masculine. They are the symptoms of insecurity and weakness. My question is why are so many men (and less commonly woman) so insecure that they feel the need for big tires and aggressive looking guns?

-just don’t get it.

Skid
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Skid

I call the lifted diesel truck fetish “Peterbilt Envy”.

What’s funny is that off-road racing trucks sit as low as possible to have a low center of gravity so they don’t want to tip over.

FDUP
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FDUP

Sorry, but Austin is too hot, humid and hilly to seriously challenge PDX except maybe as the Fred capitol of the US…

Mike Quigley
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Mike Quigley

The Law of Inverse Proportions: The bigger the tires on the pickup, the smaller the dick on the driver.

Fred
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Fred

Thanks for sharing the link to the article about the potential link between prostate problems and cycling. I wish the article would make a distinction between regular upright bicycles and recumbent bicycles and tricycles. Many older men ride recumbents for this very reason: less pressure on the prostate and more comfortable longer rides (2-3 hours). There are two shops in Portland (Recumbent PDX and Rose City Recumbents) dedicated to serving this population, so it’s a sizeable group and you might want to check it out. Thanks.