Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

The Monday Roundup: Sexism, scooter lane, space helmet, SW Corridor and more

Posted by on October 8th, 2018 at 10:56 am

Here are the most noteworthy stories we’ve come across in the past seven days…

Do our part: A major new climate report paints a dire picture and reminds us that everyone in the transportation universe needs to stop placating auto abusers and start aggressively transforming our system into one that is cleaner and more efficient.

The Dutch example: Saying that, “using a phone is just as dangerous on a bike as it is in a car,” the infrastructure minister for The Netherlands is pushing for a cell phone ban for bicycle riders.

Sexism at the races: A veteran race announcer was fired after women voiced concern over sexist remarks made over the loudspeaker at a major cyclocross race.

How to pass other riders: I hate that I have to share this; but unsafe and rude passing on bikeways continues to be a big problem. This how-to from Bicycle Times has some good tips.

Political reality: As planners and politicians gathered inside and LA’s Mayor made a big speech at the NACTO conference, concerned road users staged a protest outside as a reminder that there’s much more work to be done.

Sign of things to come: A transportation reform group in Kansas City, Missouri has installed a temporary bike and scooter lane on a two-block stretch of their downtown.

Advertisement

Best e-cargo bikes: In case you’re curious, Wired has a nice breakdown of four excellent electric-assist cargo bike options — ranging from $1,800 to $7,000.

End of an era: The leader of NYC’s venerable nonprofit Transportation Alternatives, Paul Steely White, will leave his post after 14 years to take a job with micromobility startup Bird. White follows other advocacy leaders who’ve taken jobs with similar companies.

Too bad it’s necessary: Reliance Foundry shared an overview of the “human bollard” movement as urgency ratchets up for protected lanes nationwide.

Spacey helmet: A nifty new helmet designed for those reluctant to wear them looks like a baseball cap and was created using aerospace technology.

SW Corridor failings: Michael Andersen puts it simply in his latest piece for Sightline: “Apartments are banned from half the land around stations on Portland’s next rail line. If that won’t change, the line shouldn’t be built.”

Take back the streets: Madrid is the latest city to take significant steps to improve options to driving in its urban core with their Sustainable Mobility Ordinance — a host of law changes that aims to make streets safer and biking and walking more convenient.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

Never miss a story. Sign-up for the daily BP Headlines email.

BikePortland needs your support.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

68
Leave a Reply

avatar
11 Comment threads
57 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
34 Comment authors
9wattsDan AMiddle of the Road GuyJPChris I Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
bikeninja
Guest
bikeninja

I am glad you included the new IPCC report in this weeks roundup. I hope this moves our thinking along from the debate that cycling versus driving is just two different choices that are equally valid. If we are to survive on this planet we must move quickly ( next 5 years) away from vehicles that burn fossil fuels, use electricity from fossil fuels, or are imbedded with huge amounts of fossil fueled energy in their manufacture ( I.e. big). Driving an oil burner is no longer a justifiable choice but a kind of addiction that the rest of us must help the addicted get over, like an intervention to get a junkie in to rehab. Lets stop making excuses for auto addiction and move forward with “radical” plans to save our future.

Jay Dedd
Guest
Jay Dedd

Yeah, race announcers.

This summer at Mt. Tabor, teenage family friend races for the first time. Gets dropped of course, as do others. Solos on as “first straggler” for many laps. Announcer singles him out and drubs him for having his mirror still on his helmet. Adds nothing good to the experience for spectators or riders. Reinforces perception of road racing having an extremely high bar of snootiness for beginners to clear.

Meanwhile that evening: Juniors field was so small it was combined with Cat 5. Maybe not unrelated.

caesar
Guest
caesar

The Dutch move to ban phoning while cycling surprises me given what appears to be the paucity of evidence supporting it. At the same time, using one’s device while riding should be shamed. Riding a bike is it’s own reward; it’s the closest any of us will ever come to experiencing free flight. If you’re so bored riding your bike that you must text or check your twitter feed then you don’t *deserve* to be on a bike! Morally and aesthetically repugnant, yes, but not criminal. Sorry, Holland, you blew this one.

Josh
Guest
Josh

The Bicycle Times piece on passing has a few useful tips, but it failed to mention that sometimes folks ahead of you can’t hear you for reasons other than wearing headphones or being oblivious. Some people are deaf or hard of hearing, and won’t hear any bell or vocalization no matter how polite you are.

Just remember that as the person passing, the onus is on you to do so safely. If you need to slow to a walking pace to safely pass someone walking or biking ahead of you, then slow to a walking pace. If you can’t pass safely, don’t do it.

Jillian
Guest
Jillian

Thanks for posting the article on how to pass. I’ve been surprised since I moved down from Seattle how rarely people in Portland signal in some way that they are passing you. I figured that it happens more in Seattle because the Cascade Bicycle Club up there does trainings on their ride on etiquette, so makes it more of a norm. ?

9watts
Subscriber

Michael Andersen’s piece is excellent.

I’ll just note, for the umpteenth time, that our discourse still seems incapable of including any discussion of limits to growth. Until we face that music we will always be playing defense. Why would we choose to do this? Because problematizing growth (in population, consumption, economic activity, car sales) is too hot to touch? Sure, I get that. But is kicking these cans down the road really an alternative? Once we’ve achieved a metro area of 3 million or 4 million people is it going to be easier to talk about the need to stop?

The IPCC report, referenced above, is just the tip of the iceberg. We need to stop pussyfooting around and trust ourselves to (also) think big.

B. Carfree
Guest
B. Carfree

We have an article on a new helmet, an article on human bollards calling for more mid-block “protection” and an article on a “parking protected” bike and scooter lane in this week’s crop of 12 links. What do those all have in common? The idea that riding a bike is inherently dangerous and is much more dangerous than using a car. Predictable outcome: we’re having trouble getting people to ride bikes.

I’m a coward, like pretty much everyone else. I don’t ride because I’m brave, I ride because it’s fun and healthy. Sure, I deal with bad drivers multiple times each day, but a wee bit of knowledge makes those encounters non-issues, and almost anyone can learn what needs knowing to ride with joy, but few will if they are convinced that riding around cars is too dangerous for mere mortals.

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

How to pass other riders: No, I will not sound my bell to pass other riders. Just as drivers will not honk to pass other drivers. It’s bad enough that I have to ring my bell constantly over the Hawthorne as I pass all the pedestrians. I’m not contributing any more to urban noise. When you’re out in public you expect other people to be near you. All path users already know that runners and fast cyclists are prone to pass them. They don’t need your noise.

Carrie
Subscriber

At last year’s Sea Otter Classic my colleague and I were appalled at the sexist language used by one of the announcers before the road race. It was demeaning and made us feel very much not part of ‘the club’, even though we both are and should be.

q
Guest
q

Speaking of passing etiquette, when I’m walking on paths, I appreciate people on bikes who are riding towards me and passing past me who do not blind me with arrays of blinding lights, especially the retina-searing strobes.