Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

The Monday Roundup: Commute discrimination, cultural appropriation, Dutch inspiration and more

Posted by on September 4th, 2018 at 10:21 am

Welcome to the week.

Today’s Monday Roundup (that I realize is on a Tuesday) is sponsored by Cycle Oregon’s new Gravel event coming up October 5-7th. There are still spots left!

Here are the best things we came across in the past seven days…

Signs matter: New research from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) says lowering posted speed limits by as little as 5 mph causes people to slow down. Someone should tell ODOT.

Vision more transit: Research (funded by a transit group) finds that places with higher transit ridership per capita also have fewer traffic fatalities.

Not enough vision: Several counties in England are cracking down on visually-impaired drivers by taking away licenses upon failure of a basic eye test.

Snob scoots Stumptown: Don’t miss this very fun take on the scooter scene in Portland from none other than Evan “Bike Snob NYC” Weiss.

Scary numbers: A strong majority of respondents (62 percent) in a UK government survey said the top reason they don’t bike is that they don’t feel safe on roads. What that number would be in the US?

Advertisement

“Commute discrimination”: A study in Washington D.C. found that employers were much more likely to call back job applicants who lived closer to the position — which tend to be more expensive.

Hit-and-run injustice: NY Times examines police crash investigation policies in light of one woman’s frustrating attempts to find justice after being victim of a hit-and-run.

Blatant cultural appropriation: A Czech bike brand has issued a statement and says changes are coming after criticisms for their over-the-top use of Native American imagery and culture in their marketing.

Hand signals: The New Yorker did a fun illustrated spread titled, “Cyclist Hand Signals and their Meanings.”

Going Dutch: This quality interview from Vox with authors Melissa and Chris Bruntlett is a handy primer on Dutch cycling culture and how it can inspire a revolution in America.

Happy streets?: An advocate with Washington Area Bicyclist Association laid out a fantastic argument for why we should provide less more space on our streets for the majority of people who don’t use cars: Because it would make everyone happier.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

Never miss a story. Sign-up for the daily BP Headlines email.

BikePortland needs your support.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

35
Leave a Reply

avatar
10 Comment threads
25 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
19 Comment authors
GlowBoydwkPS9wattsq Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Jon
Guest
Jon

It would be nice if optometrists had to report anyone with eyesight bad enough that they cannot safely drive. Social workers, doctors, nurses, school workers, etc. all legally have to report child abuse. Visually impaired drivers are at least as dangerous. It is far too easy to get and keep a licence to drive a 5000 pound vehicle that can go 80 or more miles per hour as we see every day.

John Liu
Guest
John Liu

Hey, any chance you might be covering this bikeshare conference? I’m really interested to hear about it.

https://www.oregonlive.com/commuting/index.ssf/2018/09/portland_will_host_bikeshare_e.html

“About 350 bike-share experts and industry representatives from around the world will be in Portland this week.

The North American Bikeshare Association is holding its fifth annual conference, and Portland will play host for the first time.

The organization is the only one of its kind. It represents cities, nonprofit organizations and private companies operating the on-demand bike rental programs popping up in cities throughout the country.”

David Hampsten
Guest

Vision More Transit: When I was a student working on my MURP at PSU, I had a professor Strathman who taught that whenever you did a correlation taking 2 seemingly unrelated items that are using the same variable on both the x and y axis, in this case “per capita”, you will always get a hyperbola and a very strong correlation. Since then I’ve used it many times to make very convincing, though basically untrue, arguments in the favor of my agencies points. Interesting that StreetsBlog is willing to publish this piece of academic GIGO.

bikeninja
Guest
bikeninja

Reader the scooter story gave me a business idea. According to Evan the biggest problem with the e-scooters was finding one near the end of the day that still had juice in it. It seems that the scooter bro’s would find it advantageous if they could purchase some kind of shaped foil blanket ( to act as a faraday cage) that they could drape over a scooter after it was stashed in an out of view location, so it would become invisible on the apps, so it would be available to ride home at the end of the day , or to take on an evening bar run.

Caitlin D
Subscriber

That Bike Snob piece about scooters was fun 🙂

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

“Commute discrimination”: I admit to being a commute discriminator. All skills being equal I pick the one that lives closest to the job.

PS
Guest
PS

Weird, no link to the KOIN article from yesterday that shows a 20% decrease in scooter ridership from week 3 to week 5? I was wondering why PBOT hadn’t sent out an instagram update since week 3. Is the novelty really fading this quickly?

https://www.koin.com/news/local/multnomah-county/by-the-numbers-e-scooters-in-portland/1415855608

Jim Lee
Guest
Jim Lee

Why is appropriating “Dutch cycling culture” not cultural appropriation?

Robert Nobles
Guest
Robert Nobles

Biketown has been down for at least the last two hours as confirmed by my call to support. Been emailing them since 9:30 this morning and they still have not sent out a system wide message to users via the app or email last I checked.
Late for work and missed dentist appointment.

B. Carfree
Guest
B. Carfree

I have to wonder how many of the people who claim to be afraid to ride bikes have been unduly influenced by so-called cycling advocates. Folks who claim that we need to build completely separate infrastructure are likely making those who are considering riding bikes look around and believe they can’t safely ride a bike because all, most or some of their routes will put them on regular roads. Worse, we’re now condemning even decent bike lanes (not saying most bike lanes are decent, but many are) as though they are some sort of death traps.

Cycling requires a handful of easily obtainable skills. Even in the worst conditions, it’s no more dangerous than being in a car, and it is known to add years to lives. Why is this not the primary message of cycling advocates?