Support BikePortland - Journalism that Matters

The Monday Roundup: NYC’s special sauce, right-hook research, a moral dilemma, and more

Posted by on August 13th, 2018 at 12:29 pm


Welcome to Monday!

Hope you had a chance to pedal through the nice cool weekend. Who got caught out on a ride without a jacket?

This week’s Monday Roundup is sponsored by Efficient Velo Tools: From inflators and wheel-building tools, to the EZ-Lift Repair Stand, Portland’s Efficient Velo Tools offers tools for the pro and home mechanic! Learn more about their great products here.

And with that, here are the most noteworthy stories we came across in the past seven days…

How NYC does it: From road redesigns that put bikers and walkers first, to tough speed enforcement laws, New York City’s progress toward Vision Zero is getting much-deserved attention.

Plan for racial equity: One of America’s leading active transportation planning firms, Alta Design, has published a plea for more people in their industry to address how their work impacts people of color.

Push for automobile green light: In London there are traffic signals that default green to walkers and force auto users to trigger a change.

Bright side of ridesharing: While rideshare vehicles like Uber and Lyft clog our roads and raise VMT overall, they are also credited with reducing drunk driving.

Rideshare regs: NYC is about to lower-the-boom on Uber and Lyft by capping the amount of cars and requiring licenses and minimum wage pay for drivers.

Right-hook research: A PSU researcher is among the authors in this new study about right hooks that found the worst-case scenario is when the auto user is focused on cars around them and the bicycle rider approaches from behind.

Advertisement

More on bad drivers: Research from University of Toronto found that a majority of auto users don’t scan for bicycle users or walkers before turning right.

Biking while black: The leader of a bike advocacy group in Oakland was stopped during a group ride because police felt his music was too loud. The man, who is black, ended up in jail.

Cars are the problem: A shopping district in an Los Angeles neighborhood wants to improve its retailing vibe and encourage more shopping and hanging out. Their solution? Get rid of the cars.

From parking to housing: An architect writing for Fast Company has great ideas on how cities can build parking garages that are future-proof and can be easily adapted into useful things like housing.

It’s the street design, stupid: If we really cared about safety we’d put a higher priority on street designs that slow people down, than hoping and praying that high-tech robo-cars will be the solution.

Report = deport: Interesting debate on Streetsblog Chicago after a woman on a bike was injured by a careless road user, yet decided to not report the incident because the driver was using an expired green card and she didn’t want to subject her to immigration authorities.

Serious activism: In Bangladesh a reckless bus operator hit a group students on the side of the road and the incident sparked a “revolution” with people taking to the streets to demand safety.

The curious case of “Mr. X”: This is the absolutely bonkers tale of journalists trying to track down the author of an anti-cycling Facebook campaign that gathered major steam. Goes to show you should always view FB content from unverified sources with extreme skepticism.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

Never miss a story. Sign-up for the daily BP Headlines email.

BikePortland needs your support.

NOTE: Thanks for sharing and reading our comments. To ensure this is a welcoming and productive space, all comments are manually approved by staff. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for meanness, discrimination or harassment. Comments with expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia will be deleted and authors will be banned.

43
Leave a Reply

avatar
9 Comment threads
34 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
20 Comment authors
Alan 1.0PeteGlowBoyHello, KittyJohnny Bye Carter Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
bikeninja
Guest
bikeninja

I think a better idea than building parking garages to become future housing is to just not waste land or resources building any more. When these structures are no longer needed the future residents will have such a bad taste in their mouths from the environmental destruction, waste, lives lost and social degradation caused by the automobile ands its single purpose storage edifices that they will not want to see them or live in them. They will become monuments to a crazy and wasteful time when humans trashed the planet and almost ended our voyage on spaceship earth in our quest for the good life.

soren
Guest
soren

“plans to spend $1.6 billion US by 2022 to make the city’s roads safer”

SURE……but portland drafted an excellent vision zero plan* that was unanimously ratified by council and highlighted at multiple planning conferences!

*not being sarcastic — it is a good plan.

Chris I
Guest
Chris I

I wish we could deport anyone who caused injuries by driving carelessly.

Matthew in PDX
Guest
Matthew in PDX

My concern about converting parking garages into residential or commercial is that automobile fumes are a toxic cocktail of nasties, I am not sure you could ever remove those from the concrete structure. We worry about radon in our homes causing lung cancer, how much more would we worry about a structure that marinaded in auto fumes for several decades.

Mick O
Guest
Mick O

Whenever I hear NYC’s Vision Zero commercials on the radio during Yankee games I get very sad that Portland does not share a similar “vision.” I wish I could find them online somewhere, but they are quite direct and clear, speaking to drivers about responsibility, not some generalized messaging.

Dave
Guest
Dave

If I was the Chicago lady, I’d have no trouble telling the driver something like “give me your keys and title or I’ll turn your ass into ICE.” No trouble whatsoever.

Bald One
Guest
Bald One

Right Hook problems when bikers and not where they are expected to be, especially when approaching in a counter-flow direction on the wrong side of the road. Now, applies for eScooters too. It sounds like the scooter rider recently hurt on 122nd was scooting like a salmon in the bike lane and got hit by a turning driver. And the city seems to want to increase use of counter-flow curb-lane bike lanes (scooters too!) across drives and intersections along busy and high-speed roadways.

When you have counter-flow bike/scooter traffic, right-hook can also mean pulling out of a driveway and hooking a bike approaching to your right (because the driver didn’t look right or the cyclist came up quickly and the driver was trying to quickly merge out into traffic. And, this will also apply to left-turning vehicles moving into driveways and intersections that don’t see a counter flow cyclist coming up from the left and behind. Clearly, encouraging traffic patterns with counter flow sidepaths for bikes in the roadway across drives and intersections is dangerous in these road designs based on typical driver behaviors. The right hook just got a lot of new potential scenarios.

John Liu
Guest
John Liu

Parking garages would make terrible converted housing, because so much of the floor area is deep in the interior, far from any window. More likely to be usable as commercial, industrial or retail space, because users don’t demand natural light (or they want it but no-one cares – cubicle farms etc).

Johnny Bye Carter
Subscriber
Johnny Bye Carter

I have an issue with the sponsor’s link in this article.

https://www.efficientvelo.com/home/safezone/buy-now/

It links to the “SAFE ZONE HELMET MIRROR” product rather than to the company’s main page.

This product buys into the “bicycles are dangerous” trap trying to sell us on the “safety” of the ability to look behind you.

Admittedly, I used a mirror for a couple years when I started riding regularly. But then I found that it was simply a source of stress. There’s no reason I need to look in a mirror. Very seldom am I crossing so many lanes of traffic that a turn of my head is insufficient to see what’s there. I rarely need to see what I’ve already passed.

Mirrors are for cars so you don’t kill somebody. As a cyclist my adventure is in front of me.