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Waterfront Park altercations leave path users injured and scared

Posted by on September 4th, 2015 at 12:08 pm

waterfront park-2.jpg

Crowds are common in Waterfront Park.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Some people who use Waterfront Park have taken it upon themselves to enforce their version of the rules by instigating collisions with people who ride bicycles through the park.

“As I slowly got up, I turned back and saw him walking away across the park, shouting “fast bikes on Naito!”
— Ranjeewa Weerasinghe

In the past week we’ve heard of two separate instances from several different sources. In one incident a man was injured when another man allegedly pushed a skateboard into his path on purpose. The man then yelled, “Fast bikes on Naito!” which is a reference to signs installed by the Portland Parks & Recreation bureau last year that encourage faster riders to ride in the street instead of the park path.

According to our sources, this man with the skateboard has done this same thing more than once. In another case, a man allegedly stepped in front path users with the intent to make them crash.

On September 1st just before 5:30, Ranjeewa Weerasinghe was riding home from work, headed northbound on the Waterfront Park path along the Willamette River. As he approached the Burnside Bridge he was behind a line of other people riding bikes and they were going past a large group of people. Weerasinghe recalls there were about 15 people, half of them sitting and standing around a bench to his left and the others were leaning up against the guardrail on his right. Here’s what he says happened next:

“One of them leaning on the guardrail had a skateboard under his foot, pointing across the path towards the bench. As we rode past, he shouted something at the first cyclist, then kicked his skateboard across the path. It hit my front wheel, sending me over my handlebars onto the ground. As I slowly got up, I turned back and saw him walking away across the park, shouting “fast bikes on Naito!”

Weerasinghe suffered “quite a few scrapes and bruises” on his forehead, shoulder, arms, and hands. He slammed on the ground so hard his right hip was sore the next day and a piece of his helmet broke off.

He didn’t report the incident to the police until he learned he wasn’t the only one this has happened to. When Weerasinghe told his co-workers about the incident the next morning, one of them said they saw a very similar incident last month involving a skateboard and a man yelling, “Fast bikes on Naito!” Realizing it wasn’t an isolated incident, Weerasinghe filed a report with the Portland Police Bureau.

One day after I heard about Weerasinghe’s incident I heard from north Portland resident Noah Brimhall about a separate altercation.

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waterfront park-1.jpg

Some people think this means bikes
are not allowed on the path.

Brimhall was riding in in the same direction as Weerasinghe at around the same time and around the same place. Brimhall also approached an area with a large group of people around a bench on one side and around the railing on the other, creating a path between them where other path users could go. Here’s how Brimhall described what happened as he rode through that path:

“I was slowing down to pass between the guys carefully when another man riding a bike passed me going a bit faster on my left and came up to the guys on the grass side of the path. At the last second one of the guys in that group, who was facing me and the other guy riding a bike, stepped into the bike riders path. In my opinion this was done very purposely to cause an accident.”

“When the behavior crosses the line and is criminal or threatening to people, that’s when we need to be involved.”
— Sgt. Pete Simpson, Portland Police Bureau

According to Brimhall the other rider (who he says wasn’t riding at an unsafe speed) had to slam on his brakes and swerve to avoid the man who’d stepped into his path. When Brimhall stopped, he was reprimanded by the man who stepped into the path. “He started yelling about how ‘you are going to fast’ and ‘this is a walking path.’ Brimhall argued back that the path is for everyone and that he shouldn’t step into the path on purpose. Brimhall said at this point the man and his “friends” were getting aggressive and one of the kicked his bike’s rear tire “very hard.”

At that point, Brimhall rode away to avoid any more confrontation. His rear wheel was now wobbly from the kick and he had to disconnect his rear brake to make it home. The wheel will need to be fixed by a professional before he can ride again.

These incidents have left both Weerasinghe and Brimhall with some serious questions. How should someone handle a situation like this? Should people simply avoid riding the Waterfront Park path? Can anything be done to fix this situation?

Portland Police Bureau spokesman Pete Simpson said the best thing to do if you get threatened or assaulted is to call 911 immediately. He said it’s crucial to give officers a good description of the alleged suspect.

Simpson also said the PPB is “keenly aware of the aggressive behavior” in Waterfront Park. “We acknowledge and are fully aware of the challenges between the community using the parks and the interactions between people walking and biking in the parks.” Simpson said the bureau walks a “fine line” around the issue and emphasized that they “we are not policing homelessness, we are policing behavior.”

“When the behavior crosses the line and is criminal or threatening to people, that’s when we need to be involved.”

Weerasinghe hasn’t ridden since his incident because he still needs to buy a new helmet and he wants his wounds to heal up. He initially figured he’s start using the bike lane on Naito, but now feels like he’ll return to the path through the park while keeping his eyes peeled for the group with the skateboard. “I know I won’t go on family rides with my daughter through there though.”

— The crowded Waterfront Path is not a new issue. Back in August we shared the story of a man who was riding a bike and hit someone and didn’t even stop. I’m afraid we’ll continue to hear stories like this until we build more adequate bicycle access and people start using the path with more respect for each other.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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canuck
Guest
canuck

Don’t paint this as just a one sided incident. You reported yourself in August on the cyclist who basically did a hit and run.

http://bikeportland.org/2015/08/24/hit-run-waterfront-park-shows-disturbing-lack-conscience-156160

People just aren’t playing nice together on the MUPs be they pedestrians or cyclists.

Adam Herstein
Guest
Adam Herstein

PPB needs to have a few officers patrolling Waterfront Park at all times. By bike or walking. The presence of an officer can influence behavior and discourage these assaults. They can also be there to make arrests more quickly if an incident does happen.

Kiel Johnson (Go By Bike)
Guest
kiel johnson

another reason why you shouldn’t put meaningless unforcable signs up “fast bikes use naito” especially when there is not a better option.

Lance Wright
Guest
Lance Wright

I worked for Parks downtown for over 15 years until recently as a horticulturist. Waterfront was one of my Parks as was, for a time, the Eastbank Esplanade. There have always been conflicts on these paths, it is inherent in a ‘multi-modal’ path like these that mix bikes and pedestrians. Ideally they would be separate, but they aren’t. Several years back Parks staff were told that there was a 10 mph speed limit on these paths. There were several times where staff, doing our jobs were nearly hit and others that we know of where pedestrians were hit. As staff we asked for public education/signs/enforcement because we could see an increasing problem. The police told us that the esplanades would have to be posted for them to enforce…and they didn’t want to do it. I’m not sure what if anything has changed since then, but I don’t see the problem going away. I do not condone the ‘skateboarder’s’ actions in anyway, but given the situation and the growing population of disaffected and angry ‘young’ people out there, it does not surprise me that this is happening.

Scott B
Guest
Scott B

I had a similar incident a few months ago where a man threw a shoe at me hitting my rear tire, the person was at the rear part of the platform.

I circled back around to confront him and he ran off toward the Skidmore Fountain.

I’ve had some sketchy encounters going through this area.

Captain Karma
Guest

I was riding there last week and some other rider came charging through a congested area at ++20 mph. I thought wtf. I should have yelled, but did not.

joel
Guest
joel

heading north on sw 2nd avenue turning west onto Oak street Wednesday on a green light a man in his 50s rushed me yelling “i have the right of way”.

I saw him standing on the corner as i turned left- he was waiting for me, looking at me, and rushed me purposefully. i signalled. and at the point of turning he started to run toward me.

i stopped. he got in my face. for all purposes i looked maybe like a messenger with a front rack, a large bag.

probably unrelated, and it did not really affect my day. just another day in portland. he looked like he was trying to have a good time.

Seth Alford
Guest
Seth Alford

When will the BTA file for an injunction to get the PPB sign removed?

Oh. Right. NEVER. It’s the BTA. Wouldn’t want to endanger the SRTS funding by annoying anyone in the power structure.

Electric Mayhem
Guest
Electric Mayhem

I’ve found that Naito is almost always faster, even if you stop at all the lights. I feel that the path should really only be used for recreation and to access the bridges.

Cory P
Guest
Cory P

A truly horrible way to use a skateboard. Hope this nonsense ends.

Todd Boulanger
Guest
Todd Boulanger

Per the MUTCD, the sign that Parks installed is not a regulatory sign for traffic (black on white) but more of a polite request.

And what are “fast bikes” anyway…this is not a term defined in statute (ORS etc.) that I can find? Is it 6 mph, 10 mph, 20 mph or 25 mph? The 1970s olympic icon would visually denote >20 mph given the stance of the rider. (The PPB’s other sign’s language about riding in congested pedestrian areas is more effective message.)

Bicyclists are required to operate at a “walking speed” on sidewalks and not MUPs/ SUPs as in this case. It would all depend on the situation (pedestrian congestion etc.) and taking due care and safety.

What we have here is a facility that has become too successful (too congested and too important of a direct east west link) in the 13+ years since it opened. In additional to being direct it is also more level than the road route.

Perhaps the “fast bikes” signs should be replaced by a new sign message: “Congestion Free Bike Route to Eastside this way via Naito” etc.

Todd Hudson
Guest
Todd Hudson

If there’s an event like Bite of Oregon, Waterfront Park is just too crowded. When there are no events, it’s a bum resort, complete with open air drug use and public sex (saw that last week, blech). It just feels like an unsafe place.

I gave up on anything north of The Bowl ever being a safe or comfortable place to ride.

Dwaine Dibbly
Guest
Dwaine Dibbly

Throw the skateboard into the river if you witness this.

jeff
Guest
jeff

welcome to Portland’s homeless problem.

Kat
Guest
Kat

One thing I take while riding is mace. Maybe more cyclists should do this.

Paul Atkinson
Guest
Paul Atkinson

This represents yet another reason I ride with a GoPro pointing forward and a Fly6 pointing back. EIther they see the cameras and this kind of incident doesn’t happen near me, or they don’t and there’s something to hand over to the police.

I ride a mix of E and W esplanade and Naito, depending on the day. This makes me want to ride the esplanade more.

Todd Hudson
Guest
Todd Hudson

Also, don’t count on 911 for a fast response. Three weeks ago, I was running on the Esplanade and encountered a man hitting his girlfriend and threatening to kill her. I dailed 911 and was “on hold” for 3-4 minutes. I waited another ten minutes…no police response. By this time the perpetrator had left the area.

Jim and Becky
Guest
Jim and Becky

PPD need to have a few of their own ride through the area in cycling garb, carefully with moderation, and see what happens. They’d be on site for an immediate arrest.

redhippie
Guest
redhippie

A big part of the problem is that to cyclists the area is a MUP. To alot of the folks who hang out there it is their living room, bedroom and bathroom. I wouldn’t want people speeding through my living space either.

Personally, I rid the path in the morning when most are still asleep and tend to avoid it and go over the steel bridge in the afternoon. That is another issue with cars that get mad that a cyclist is taking a full (and only) lane on the top deck.

In short, there are a lot of issues in the that particular area that need a creative planning (and maybe law enforcement) approach to resolve.

Dave
Guest
Dave

When we are sharing pedestrian space, we are under an absolute moral obligation to ride at pedestrian speed. Yeah, the skateboard throwers and collision engineers are dickheads–but if you want to ride faster than a pedestrian, ride on the road in a vehicular manner. We’re not Copenhagen yet no matter what some folks might hallucinate about.

Dave
Guest
Dave

Adam H.
Oh, I totally agree that we shouldn’t ride fast on Waterfront Park. Just, how am I supposed to know if I am riding under 10 MPH?Recommended 0

You can get a rudimentary bike computer for the price of a few cups of coffee. You can learn to read the numbers on it.

George H.
Guest
George H.

Jonathan, you’ve seemingly avoided coming out and saying who the problem-causers are. Everyone knows it’s the homeless drug addicts who refuse services that are making Waterfront Park into an unattractive, unsafe place for legitimate park users.

This problem could easily be solved with a solution that is fair but does not burden the criminal justice system: put a persistent police presence at Waterfront Park. When people use drugs in the open or are suspected of having drugs, have the police confiscate their drugs and all their paraphernalia. A junkie’s prized possession is his/her drugs, and with the threat of confiscation, they will choose to loiter somewhere else.

Parks are not for drug use, nor are they for anti-social behavior.

Cycledadpdx
Guest
Cycledadpdx

To be honest the Waterfront is a giant stink-hole. The amount of crime, street people, drugs, and human waste is disgusting. To quote a group of people from out of town I over heard on my commute one day: “this place is disgusting. lets never come back here.” Had to nod my head and agree. The Waterfront area could be so nice.

Fred
Guest
Fred

This happened to me last week too. Some homeless kid step in front of my path and yelled “fast bikes on Natio.” I could easily get around him since I wasn’t riding fast. I think this issue is more about groups of homeless that gather on the path in the evenings being aggressive to park users rather than overall biking etiquette on the path.

Lately I’ve just been riding down the grass to avoid the lights on Natio and troubles on the waterfront path.

Rob Chapman
Guest
Rob Chapman

**Comment deleted.

Rob, I don’t tolerate any encouragement or suggestion of any type of weapon that will be used against another person. I hope you understand. — Jonathan**

Alex
Guest
Alex

The solution is to fix the connections between Naito and the Steel bridge pathways.

Give cyclists an easy path from the Steel bridge onto Naito (and vice-versa), and make Naito safe enough for cyclists to want to be there, and all the “fast” bikes will go where they can go fast.

That slippery-when-wet granite rock garden isn’t cutting it, and neither is the ramp through the fountain and the homeless camp beneath the bridge.

It won’t fix the entitled, indignant, drugged-out street kid problem, but that’s not PBOT’s problem to solve.

John Liu
Guest
John Liu

The political correctness sort won’t ever acknowledge it, but the growing number of homeless people in our public parks and MUPs is causing many and varied problems. This is just one.

estherc
Guest
estherc

I’m kind of baffled by people who are assaulted and don’t know what to do about it, like there’s no recourse or action to take after they’ve gotten to safety. I’m sure they have cell phones. I find if amazing that people don’t think to call 911 as soon as possible. I call 911 and the nonemergency dispatch number so much I’m afraid they think oh god her again. But usually its because I’m concerned about people I see on the street. Naked guy turning circles in front of warehouse, drunk passed out in doorway in subzero weather, lady putting shoes in the middle of the street and talking to herself.

I hope that doesn’t sound like victim blaming but really, if you are the victim of a crime call 911. How do you expect the perpetrators to be caught and prevented from doing it again unless you take legal action against them? Do you want them to continue to stay in the park and assault you and others.

invisiblebikes
Guest
invisiblebikes

I think your missing the big picture here, these are Not “pedestrians” upset with cyclists. These actions are a specific type or group of people that have no respect for anyone other than the drug addled squatter that they feed off of.

I’ve seen these exact people many times as I ride through there and theur “territory” has grown drastically over the last year.
They are getting aggressive because that’s what happen when you allow this type of element to be left unchecked in a public park. Eventually it will escalate to a broader range of violence towards anyone “not in their group” that encroaches on their “territory” It won’t be just cyclists that are getting harassed.
Then once they see that it is working and more people avoid their area’s it will become a violent line to cross.

PPD needs to enforce the law by adding hourly patrols and end the overnight campers and all of the “squatting” that is going on. The drug use, the drunken disgusting people that “hang around” there now is way out of control and what is happen will only get worse.

Gil Johnson
Guest
Gil Johnson

In New York City, along the Hudson River Parkway, there are segregated multi use paths. Basically, the paths are about as wide as the ones along the Esplanade and Waterfront Park, but with a line down the middle. Pedestrians on one side of the line, bicyclists on the other–with another path using the same split going the other direction. Say what you want about New Yorkers, but they pretty much follow the rules on these paths. Maybe Portlanders would, too.

At least that would reduce the normal tensions between bikers and peds. These recnet incidents at Waterfront Park are caused by angry and probably intoxicated homeless men, and to solve that, we have to solve all the problems contributing to homelessness.

Kyle
Guest
Kyle

Similar incident happened to me last month, except the guy, easy to identify with his tattoos across his eyebrows, stepped into me and attempted to clothesline me. I was not riding fast, and had eye contact with him as he made his move. Fortunately I was aware that something was strange and prepped for it, allowing me to continue riding thru him and his attempt. He was standing in the middle of the path, just waiting for people to give his “fast bikes on Natio speech”. Freaked me out pretty bad, and now I ride solely on the sketchy Natio bike lane.

Brian
Guest
Brian

I won’t even describe the situation my students had to witness on a field trip along the waterfront last year. Unreal. This town needs a good ol’ fashioned bicycle gang, like the Bell’s Angels.

Adam
Guest
Adam

Looks like assault and battery to my slightly educated eyes.

Ryan
Guest
Ryan

Just curious, does anyone honestly have an issue with riding Naito NORTHBOUND? I know there’s an ongoing discussion about how to improve that major artery for cycling etc, and I hate being on there going south, but northbound it’s a breeze – hardly any stopping, no pedestrian congestion, and the bonus of much less odor of human piss.

But seriously, do people avoid Naito going north in the same way they do for going south?

gutterbunnybikes
Guest

Not condoning the behavior of the skateboard tosser by any means, it was wrong and dangerous and the culprit deserves some form of legal punishment even to the extent of assault. And I got no qualm with people riding fast on the MUPs when no one else is around, but I do have issues with many of the comments on here.

Honestly people- some of you that are complaining about having to ride slower on a MUP is completely ridiculous. The path on the Waterfront is what a mile long – the Esplanade is what 1 1/2 miles, which means it’s a 6/9 minute ride at 10 MPH and 3/4.5 minute ride at 20 mph. The difference in travel time is less than getting stuck at more than one red light on your trip. You’re complaining over 2 or 3 minutes of time spent on some of the most beautiful urban riding paths in city, country even. I’d assume that if you commute the route everyday for work you already compensate for this time for the chance of a bridge delay.

Are you so self centered that you can’t spare 2 or 3 minutes in your trip to help assure the safety of yourself and those around you? How hypocritical. You expect this same behavior of automobiles when you are riding in the streets, but fail to offer this same respect you demand of the other path users in your way.

There is a hierarchy out there on the streets. Many believe there is a moral component (which is what is THE MISSING component to the US transportation conversation) where the bigger and faster the vehicles bear more responsibility than those that are smaller and slower. So the road and path users that deserve the most grace would be the pedestrians, followed by bikes/boarders, then cars. It’s “with great power comes great responsibility”. It’s basic respect, It’s that simple.

You wanna know why people think of cyclists as entitled and whiny… Just look in the mirror if you think riding at a reasonable speed on MUP is too much to ask.

jeff
Guest
jeff

I encourage you all to write Commissioner Fritz.
Amanda@portlandoregon.gov

Christian Kaylor
Guest
Christian Kaylor

I commute this daily and it is truly terrible. I appreciate the many calls for tolerance and understanding. However…

Like almost all the commenters here – I’m a fit adult male in my prime. Riding through a gauntlet of urine, clouds of smoke and angry shouts doesn’t bother me. But how can I promote bicycling to other folks in my office? People who aren’t confident cyclists? I need to be able to show them a safe, pleasant bike commute to get them out of their cars.

I want to get more people out of their cars and on to bicycles for their daily work commute. The transients camped along the path are a very real obstacle to that goal. I have no idea what the policy solution is here. Respectful bicycling is a must. But the solution needs to be more than that.

Kevin Wagoner
Guest
Kevin Wagoner

Groan, this is my commute. This is an unpleasant part (not as bad as Barbur though).

Noel
Guest
Noel

I find it uncomfortable how many folks posting here are determining that since this group of people may possibly be experiencing homelessness that they no longer count as pedestrians. People walking (or rolling) are pedestrians, regardless of where they live.

I also find it problematic how for all the people addressing the fact that these people may be experiencing homelessness, no one seems to be making the connection between transportation and housing as critical elements of a livable community. Livable for everyone.

I encourage everyone to read this article from Street Roots:
http://news.streetroots.org/2015/08/27/director-s-desk-worlds-collide-amid-portland-s-housing-crisis

“How Portland can be praised for being one of the best planned urban environments in America with no affordable-housing requirements is one of biggest myths of our time. Meanwhile, displacement and homelessness continue to occur at alarming rates within our community.”

Adam
Guest
Adam

I bike past this crowd every day. They all appear to be homeless, all appear to have no respect for themselves, or anyone around them (trash EVERYWHERE, they block the ENTIRE path sometimes with their cr*p, etc etc).

I don’t have a problem with homelessness, but I do have a problem with obnoxiousness and lack of basic respect.

The thing that REALLY irritates me, is why are they there AT ALL.

Seriously. There is a ton, and I mean a ton, of free space under the Burnside Bridge. And yet, they all choose to camp out, blocking the entire multiuse path.

If they decided to dump all their possessions all over two lanes of Naito, then park their asses down there, they would be removed by the police within ten minutes.

But because it is “only” a bikeway and pedestrian way, they can stay all they want.

Something is going to have to change, before I really, really snap at them one day. Sorry for the rant, but this particular situation drives me insane.

Oh, and as for the “bikes going too fast” accusation. Maybe so. How about this for a suggestion- don’t camp out IN THE MIDDLE OF A BIKEPATH. Then it won’t be a problem!

Anna G
Guest
Anna G

This incident has nothing to with the speed of the cyclist. I was verbally assaulted with the same line, at walking speed, since they (the street kids drinking and smoking) had the entire path blocked off. After a few very uncomfortable minutes trying to squeeze thru without antagonizing them (unsuccessful since they seemed to be spoiling for a fight), i made it past and reported it to one of the non PPB bike patrolers, the ones in yellow and black uniforms. The guy seemed very hesitant about doing anything, he probably didn’t even confront them. I now take Naito since it seems safer to me, and the really fast cyclists will just have to go around me.

HJ
Guest
HJ

I’ve spent my entire life as a PDX native watching the waterfront change. When I was little we used to love going down there as a family and enjoying the park. We never had a problem. It also didn’t smell like urine everywhere.
On the rare occasion that I go through there now it’s awful. The entire place smells like piss, there’s trash everywhere and the homeless population has become menacing. Mind you, the homeless were always there, they just never used to be an issue. You left them alone, they left you alone save for maybe the occasional spanging. Harmless.
I would love nothing more than to see the city address the issue as at this point I find the park far more of an embarrassment to the city than the jewel it used to be.
As to the conflicts between users I really think a lot of this could be solved with a little paint. Mark part of the path for bikes and part for pedestrians. Also may I suggest to the parks some signs that were quite effective along the Schuylkill river MUP in Philly? They were small ones that said “Slower users stay right”. Simple, easy to understand and while not perfect I found they had a surprising rate of compliance.
I think if you made these few small, easy improvements and got the cops to actually show up and arrest the miscreants attacking cyclists with skateboards it would go a long way. Some of the immediate tensions in the park would ease and it would give everyone a moment to breathe and figure out a more complete solution to the larger problems.

Jon Westley
Guest
Jon Westley

I wouldn’t want to appear to justify this behavior but it is a 2-way problem. As a biker and a walker I have many times almost been mowed down by bikers on the waterfront and on the Hawthorne bridge while walking . So it’s not too surprising that people of the type who act out in general are acting out.

On the larger issue it’s no surprise that police avoid dealing with these street people. Whenever they do anything (i.e clear a camp) the marches start, the complaining starts and Hale hides under his desk. If people want this town cleaned up you better start telling the people who run this city to get on the job or they will lose their job.

Vans
Guest
Vans

Sounds like attempted murder to me, Kyle Comeau was killed in Vancouver by skateboard.

tee
Guest
tee

As a small female, it doesn’t matter that I’m fit, riding through the waterfront is uncomfortable and does not feel safe. In fact, I’ve stopped riding the west side of the waterfront north of the fountain unless I absolutely must in favor of the Naito bike lanes. I thought I might be a little overcautious, but maybe not? Can’t say I am surprised that the attacks happened given the people I have encountered there more recently.

steeb
Guest
steeb

at taylor and the esplanade under the highway there is pretty much a gutter punk hobo burning man carnival jamboree taking place nightly. complete with all expected behaviors.

the last time i crossed the steel bridge west to east via the MUP there were probably 20 transient kids/adults of various ages sitting/lounging/laying on that hill on the waterfront just before the steel bridge. slightly rambunctious and certainly looking very at ease. nothing wrong with that but it is a change from summer’s past. i expect some of the transient population will head south for winter as usually happens. i don’t expect the city or the police to solve this problem but it would be nice if they stepped into trouble areas to put a lid on things before something serious happens. i’m sure they get briefed on this kind of stuff.

i prefer going up and over the bridge anyways since it’s faster and the lower crossing is always crowded. the potential of angry people looking for altercations is just another reason to avoid that part of the path.

Dan
Guest
Dan

Oops, you’re right, you need to provide for pedestrian crossing. What you suggested sounds great.

Scott Kocher
Guest

Commissioner Fritz’s management of the waterfront has been abysmal. The issue has been brought to her attention, and… nothing.

Mark
Guest
Mark

We shouldn’t have to ask people to act in the most basic civilized manner:

Don’t steal.
Don’t verbally assault.
Don’t physically assault.

It doesn’t matter what their background is.