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The Monday Roundup: Hit and run by bike, bike golfing & more

Posted by on April 14th, 2014 at 9:12 am

Bikes at Earth Day

Bikes on the Springwater path.
(Photo by J.Maus/BikePortland)

— This week’s Monday Roundup is sponsored by ABUS Security, makers of locks that can “thwart even the cleverest of thieves.”

Here are the bike links from around the world that caught our eyes this week:

Biker hits and runs: “BAM! He hit me and just kept going,” said a woman who says her arm was broken by a man on a bicycle who hit her on the Springwater Corridor and then (illegally) left the scene last month.

Bike golfing: Vail Golf Club is adding a third mode for golfers: they can walk; they can take an electric cart; or they can now bike their clubs to the tee.

Drone injury: A flying drone that was filming a bike race whacked a triathlete in the head and sent her to the hospital.

Less congestion: Auto traffic in Seattle has been consistently falling since 2003. Go ahead, read that sentence again. (The population has grown 11 percent and transit use is up 40 percent.)

Clean mobility: You might have heard IPCC’s new warnings that climate change is already wreaking havoc, but you might have missed its praise for bike infrastructure as part of the solution.

Driving distractions: Some seem to think it might not be a good idea to let you operate iPhone apps from your car dashboard.

Bike adventuring: “Bikepacking has become a world wide epidemic,” declares the new-ish Bikepackers Magazine.

The end of Share the Road: Bike Delaware explains why it convinced the state to drop the confusing slogan “Share the Road.”

Historic vehicle: The bike of barrier-breaking African-American racer Major Taylor could be yours for $20,000.

Uber saddles up: Wired says Upscale taxi app Uber is creating a dispatch platform for bike messengers as part of a plan to create a delivery logistics service that could compete with Amazon’s.

Data source: There’s a beautiful and comprehensive set of transportation trends being charted at google.com/publicdata.

The good fight?Whatever happened to the War on the Car?” a Toronto writer says. “I miss it.”

Biking with disabilities: Chicago-based Ding Ding Let’s Ride has a nice series of blog posts about adaptive bikes, vehicles customized for people with disabilities.

Malfunctioning traffic systems: The State of Washington now lets motorcycles, but not bicycles, ignore red lights that fail to detect them.

Road diets work: The new data site FiveThirtyEight uses 12 streets in Minneapolis and New York to show that road diets don’t cause traffic jams on roads that are well below capacity.

Missouri victory: In Missouri, a state legislator briefly held up a bipartisan sales tax hike deal in order to block the state’s first bill that would let the state spend transportation money on bike paths. He backed down.

Danish bike spike: Even Copenhagers are confused about why a new study found a 35 percent jump last year in the length of the average bike trip.

Bike talk: If you are a cute boy with a beard from Portland, these successful and attractive women from Vancouver and SF want to talk about you (among other awesome things).

Post-grief activism: Aaron Naparstek is sort of over ghost bikes, the Streetsblog founder tells The Bicycle Story’s in Part 2 of a first-rate Q&A.

Stop sign stings: Happy spring! Time for the police in Urbana, Ill., to start ticketing students who run stop signs on bikes.

Profitable bike sharing: The New Balance Hubway system in Boston is operating in the black and planning to expand, thanks in part to a deep cut to the fees Alta Bicycle Share collects for each docking.

And finally: it took 18 bikers and a 50-foot-long custom trailer to haul a 1/2 ton grand piano (with pianists, performing an original work to cheer everyone along) up the longest continuous ascent in England. It’s your video of the week:

If you come across a noteworthy bicycle story, send it in via email, Tweet @bikeportland, or whatever else and we’ll consider adding it to next Monday’s roundup.

NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. BikePortland is an inclusive company with no tolerance for discrimination or harassment including expressions of racism, sexism, homophobia, or xenophobia. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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davemess
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davemess

Sloppy reporting from KATU on the Springwater hit and run story (not surprising). If the collision happened where they shot the video, that is clearly in Gresham and not in Portland. Also, while I don’t doubt she was hit, and this is a bad situation (cyclist clearly should have slowed down and not hit her), but I’m curious how it is her right arm/wrist injured? Was she walking/running on the left side of the path?

Dan
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Dan

Gah! Why do I always look at the comments in the KATU/KGW/Oregoonian stories?! Too much ignorance for a Monday morning.

TOM
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TOM

1. KATU is ….KATU. ’nuff said.
2. comments after their story are revealing
3. many, many, many walkers/joggers use the wrong side
4. often when I call “on your left” ,,they move left
5. YES, there are a lot of jerks on bikes.

Dave
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Dave

Drones are the first thing that have ever made want to be a gun owner.

Oliver
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Oliver

More than once I’ve heard “share the road” shouted at me from a motor vehicle, which taken in context could only be interpreted as “stay out of my way”

matheas michaels
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matheas michaels

Those cyclists look like they’re not even breaking sweats. Moving my piano from SE to NE without 17 other people, now that’s impressive.

are
Guest

next up in missouri, a bill to ban recreational cycling on state funded roads
http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/dailyrft/2013/02/bicycle_ban_bill_will_missouri.php

are
Guest

naparstek limits his ghost bike critique to new york city, acknowledging they “still really have their place” elsewhere. even so, i disagree with his rationale, i.e., the image makes older folks who have never ridden afraid to try. certainly that rationale would apply equally to places other than NYC.

Tim
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Tim

Has anyone else had the displeasure of driving one of the new vehicals.

Instead of turning a nob for heat and radio controls, you have buttons and touch screens for everything from telephone and navigation to radio and heating. I don’t know about you, but I can turn a nob without looking at it, but a touch screen I need to look at.

Modern cars are built for distraction. Driving has become such a chore, cars come with all kinds of things to distract you from driving. Funny, I never seem to need a distraction when I am riding. The spring blosoms and mountain veiws were plenty of distration yesterday.

Zimmerman
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Zimmerman

Sad to say I’m not surprised at the victim blaming here as it pertains to the Springwater hit & run article.

Let’s break it down to simplest terms: if you hit a person while riding a bicycle or ANY vehicle and fail to stop, you are lowlife scum.

It doesn’t matter if it was reported as happening in Portland but was actually in Gresham, or if the person walking was on the “wrong” side of the pavement. Hit & run should cause outrage regardless of the vehicle involved.

Mike Healey
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matheas michaels
Those cyclists look like they’re not even breaking sweats. Moving my piano from SE to NE without 17 other people, now that’s impressive.

Recommended 0

It was up Cragg Vale, Mytholmroyd, West Yorkshire, the longest (6 miles) gradient in England

Joe
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Joe

on your left, wait headphones up

TOM
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TOM

While slowing to be able to pass walkers safely, I’ve been buzzed by “Lance Wannabes” who must see it as sport if they can get through a gap in the traffic ….they act as if they are on a timed run.

Have yelled “Nice move A$$hole” more than once.

All I can do tho, is to be responsible for my own actions.

kevinvc
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kevinvc

I don’t think there’s much blaming the victim going on, but I do think there is hypocrisy by some folks urging against any judgement since we’ve only heard one side of the story, which runs counter to the reaction when a cyclist is the victim of a hit and run. There definitely is some merit to this, but the person on the bike is the one who has so far chosen not to step forward and counter a single one of her points. It was incumbent on him to stop or, if he left in a panic or fear, come forward now. There’s no way he hit her hard enough to cause that kind of damage without realizing there was a collision.

Psyfalcon
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Psyfalcon

Why are people against walking on the left? Its the proper way to walk on a road, facing traffic. If people walking in each direction (east/west) are equal, you’re not going to have to pass any additional people. No change except now they can see us and wont make as many sudden moves to the center.

Means I wont have to ding my bell every 30 seconds. Its hard to tell when people have heard it, and yelling on your left leaves a bunch to be desired too.

Dan
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Dan

MUPs in San Diego have an 8mph speed limit near pedestrians. That’s an option.

El Biciclero
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El Biciclero

I know this is old now, but incidents like this one bolster my opinion that like almost all MUPs in existence, this path is not wide enough. Looking at the comparative width of the bicycles and the painted lanes in the photo above, there is not nearly enough room for cyclists and pedestrians to share this path safely. A MUP should be wide enough for two pedestrians to walk side-by-side, while allowing a cyclist to pass with at least 2′ of clearance. Using armchair eyeball phototelemetry, I’d say each lane should be at least one foot wider.