Portland Plan public workshops begin tonight

Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

Show up to a workshop and let the
City know what you think is important.
If you don’t, they’ll listen to someone else.
  • 65% of Portlanders drive alone to work.
  • We travel an average of 16 miles per day by car.
  • On average, we spend about 49% of our family income on housing and transportation, while families with lower incomes can spend as much as 79%.
  • 41% of us live within a half mile of a neighborhood business district.
  • 53% of Multnomah County adults are overweight or obese.
  • Only 31% of us feel safe walking alone downtown at night.
  • If these stats shock or surprise you, you should pay attention to the Portland Plan. Last adopted in 1980 (I was five!), the plan is a state-mandated update to our comprehensive plan that will define priorities and guide how to invest public funds for the next 25 years.

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    Outgoing planning director says bikes should be “primary mode of transportation”

    Buffered Bike Lane with a bike symbol and arrow pointing forward

    “Retrofitting the cityscape for bicycles as a primary mode of transportation needs to be a priority.”
    — Gill Kelley, outgoing director of the Planning Bureau

    Whether you follow city politics or not, you’ve got to recognize that Portland is at an exciting point in its history.

    Yes, we face major challenges, but we’ve got a fresh jolt of energy in City Hall, a new Mayor who will (hopefully) not shy away from big challenges, and we’re knee-deep into the Portland Plan; which, when complete, will “guide the physical, economic, social, cultural and environmental development of Portland over the next 30 years.”

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