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  1. Comment by Kyle Banerjee June 18, 2018 @ 4:09 pm | Link

    It's an interesting issue, but I'd rather much rather have the vehicles on the bridges.

    In calculating the air pollution, you need to factor in getting on/off the ferry plus that many people will just idle vehicles for short rides and those that don't will burn more fuel and generate more pollution when restarting.

    Even downtown, the river is very nice during rush. I sometimes paddle it at night -- there is no one out on the river at all. And there's something fun about having nothing but space around you while everyone else is crammed together going nowhere fast. It's very pretty in the dark.

    Despite being an industrial river, the Willamette has some wildlife in it. Near downtown, I've encountered sea lions, beaver, an occasional otter, and of course the bird life (eagles, ospreys, wood ducks, etc). Even small motorboats that seem quiet on the surface make a heck of a lot of racket underwater that you can hear from far away. The big boats make an insane amount of noise. What's puzzling to me is why there's any wildlife at all. Moving thousands of cars using boats with massive smoke belching diesel engines that generate so much low frequency racket you can feel the sound waves does not sound fun.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  2. Comment by q June 18, 2018 @ 3:50 pm | Link

    That's quite an insightful comment. It makes me think of people driving, for example, towards a wreck blocking the freeway. Some people have seen it ahead, and slow way down. Others have not seen it yet, and continue forward at 60 or 70 mph.

    The 85th percentile speed of drivers 500 yards before the wreck might be 60 mph. But drivers who've noticed the wreck might have an 85th percentile number of 45 mph, and 65 mph for those who haven't noticed. 45 mph might be a safe speed for driving at that point, but 60 certainly wouldn't be. But 60 would be the 85th percentile speed.

    You could have a similar example of people driving in icy conditions. The people who've already hit a patch of ice might be driving half the speed of those who haven't. The 85th percentile speed of all drivers might be double the speed that a highway patrol officer might say is safe.

    The 85th percentile speed only removes the speed of the fastest 15% of drivers from consideration, when in reality maybe half or even more might be driving without accurate knowledge of what a safe speed is. "85th percentile speed of drivers who know what they're doing" would make a lot more sense as a basis for establishing limits.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


  3. Comment by Pete June 18, 2018 @ 3:48 pm | Link

    Years ago I'd never have imagined gearing our tandem with a 52-42-30 and 40-11 cassette. Now, my stoker gets to synchro-shift to what she's comfortable with - talk about a 'back seat driver'! Tell me the RD-M9000 isn't a work of art...

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  4. Comment by John Lascurettes June 18, 2018 @ 3:38 pm | Link

    They're pretty inefficient fuel-wise, slow, and cause a lot of pollution in bodies of water (both fossil fuel and noise pollution for the marine life). Granted, I'd rather have 40 people crossing a body of water on a ferry than each driving their car around it or across it on a bridge in individual cars. But in general, if a bridge is up, busses or trains are more eco-friendly than ferries.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  5. Comment by soren June 18, 2018 @ 3:33 pm | Link

    it's not a "design trend". expensive retail floor-space is a zoning requirement for many lots.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  6. Comment by Hello, Kitty June 18, 2018 @ 3:26 pm | Link

    Of course a bridge would be far more expensive. Speed bumps are cheap.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


  7. Comment by Hello, Kitty June 18, 2018 @ 3:24 pm | Link

    I'm not sure what you mean, but there are no signals or other non-static elements. There might be a sign. Compliance is excellent there.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


  8. Comment by Hello, Kitty June 18, 2018 @ 3:21 pm | Link

    Maybe we could take steps to lower the freeflow speed before applying for a speed limit change. Narrow the roadway, install speed bumps... that sort of thing.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


  9. Comment by Anthony Buczek (Metro) June 18, 2018 @ 3:21 pm | Link

    Jonathan -
    Yes, that's correct that there are no guarantees (about anything, really). The project certainly intends to close this gap. Thanks for the reporting!
    Anthony

    In response to The SW Corridor project DEIS is out: Here's what the bikeways look like Array


  10. Comment by Harald June 18, 2018 @ 3:17 pm | Link

    In New York City they're having ever more public money pumped into them (https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2018/05/03/de-blasios-ignorance-of-nycs-bus-crisis-shines-through-at-his-umpteenth-ferry-announcement/), while the rest of public transportation system crumbles.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  11. Comment by Hello, Kitty June 18, 2018 @ 3:16 pm | Link

    I don't center the homeless situation on any single cause; there are many different interlocking and overlapping problems that need to be solved. And yes -- of course -- people with health problems need housing. Who could possibly think otherwise?

    In response to Guest post: Portland's regional path network inspired other cities, now let's heed their progress Array


  12. Comment by todd boulanger June 18, 2018 @ 3:05 pm | Link

    PS. Though few building developers can or will set up Dutch style basement bike parking served with bike ramps...I have tried to suggest such recently on a few high density PDX buildings but the design trend is to not build high-rises with any sort of traditional basement, as I have ben told. So then these large bike rooms either take up all too valuable ground floor retail (thus squeezing their size down) or get pushed up onto residential floors (thus making it almost impossible to push a bak through elevator to hallways that often have 90 degree angles to reach the narrow <42 inch bike room doorway).

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  13. Comment by todd boulanger June 18, 2018 @ 3:04 pm | Link

    Yes secure inside bike parking is highly desirable. Though most Dutch baks are built for locking to a street rack and uncovered storage (marine plywood and metal chroming). [I did the same with my bak in Vancouver for years when I lived at an apartment.]

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  14. Comment by rachel b June 18, 2018 @ 3:02 pm | Link

    I love the boat idea. Or ferries. Whatever happened to ferries?

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  15. Comment by stephan June 18, 2018 @ 2:56 pm | Link

    I'd love to see a map like that for Portland, separately in the morning and evening. As the Copenhagenize page demonstrates, most people bike because it is quick. In Portland, it is still way to easy and quick to drive from A to B than to bike.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  16. Comment by todd boulanger June 18, 2018 @ 2:31 pm | Link

    PDX bakfiets-wijken...or commercial bike freight streets... when will PBoT have a standards engineering detail for such? [To accommodate the widths and grades needed for SoupCycles, BLine, and UPS trishaws?]

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  17. Comment by Chris Anderson June 18, 2018 @ 2:31 pm | Link

    The reddit comments (translated from Dutch) about the Cargo Bike Mom article are a fun glimpse into a different world. Instead of SUVs killing people left and right, they complain about how the cargo bikes are aggressive and large and take too much parking space. Those would be nice problems to have! http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=nl&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.reddit.com%2Fr%2Fthenetherlands%2Fcomments%2F8qg2uj%2Fcargobike_moms_are_gentrifying_the_netherlands%2F%3Fst%3Djikrrtw4%26sh%3D98250e10&sandbox=1

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  18. Comment by soren June 18, 2018 @ 2:17 pm | Link

    "Or only that it is demeaning to acknowledge one exists (in many cases)?"

    People with health issues also deserve access to affordable housing. Centering our chronic housing crisis on mental health or addiction smacks of prejudice..

    In response to Guest post: Portland's regional path network inspired other cities, now let's heed their progress Array


  19. Comment by JaredO June 18, 2018 @ 2:13 pm | Link

    "This panel meets quarterly and is made up of representatives from the Oregon Transportation Safety Committee, the Oregon State Police, the Association of Oregon Counties, the League of Oregon Cities and ODOT."

    I'd encourage people to count the votes.

    TSC has a voting member, who is safety-focused.

    The Portland Police brought a representative, convincing the OSP member to come along on this vote.

    The ODOT rep will likely back ODOT's findings, so that's one vote against.

    The problem is the League of Oregon Cities and Association of Oregon Counties have appointed traffic engineers to the panel, rather than elected officials, public health experts, safety advocates, etc. Get LOC and AOC to change who represents them, and I'd bet the Speed Zone Review panel would vote differently in the future.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


  20. Comment by bikeninja June 18, 2018 @ 2:03 pm | Link

    Just wait till they close down the "L" train between Brooklyn and Manhattan for repair next year. This guy will be a rock star and will have many imitators as NYC has no other conceivable way to carry in excess of 100,000 that now ride the "L" Train. Plus the east river is a lot narrower than the Hudson this guy is crossing. People think the future will be personal helicopters and robot cars but this is probably it.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  21. Comment by N June 18, 2018 @ 1:55 pm | Link

    We already have this, Westbound on the Hawthorne viaduct. Bicycles mount the curb on a ramp, then swing right between the loading zone and sidewalk waiting area for the 4, 10, and 14 lines. The pale section of concrete was added about 2 years ago. I've been riding through here for 8 years at various times during the morning commute.

    https://goo.gl/maps/ugkXfmVEEMK2

    The old setup created a lot of conflict. Since they made the loading zone wider, it's pretty ok. The wider loading zone means that if cyclists choose not to yield, the deboarding passengers have a refuge until they can cross the lane, rather than stepping off the bus and right into the bike lane. The problems I still observe are twofold:

    1. Despite signage and good sense, many cyclists chose not to yield. That's dangerous for bus passengers trying to board or deboard.

    2. Passengers don't understand that they have the right of way, or think they are being polite when they wave me through. I don't always come to a complete stop here, but I slow down to a crawl and wait for folks to cross. I've often been gestured through by someone who presumably didn't want to "inconvenience" me - if you deal with that enough, it becomes easier to just go than fight about it.

    These two problems reinforce each other, of course, because people who are accustomed to bikes going through their right of way will wave cyclists through, and cyclists who are tired of fighting over ROW will start just going.

    Based on that stop, I'd say wider boarding zones are better, but I also don't want to get squeezed into a 3' bike lane (and hat tip to the person upthread who mentioned accessible Biketown rides are 4' wide). The signage also needs to be "yield" rather than "stop" because that's what we actually want to happen.

    In response to TriMet seeks bike user feedback for new Division Transit Project station design Array


  22. Comment by bikeninja June 18, 2018 @ 1:47 pm | Link

    Thats True, If we are going to have real ,bakfietswijken, ( cargo bike neighborhoods) then we will need an ordinance requiring landlords to provide secure cargo bike parking as part of any apartment, no-parking or not. Many of these places have these big swanky common rooms that are only really used for pictures on the apartments website to trick prospective renters in to thinking the lavish common rooms are actually the postage stamp living rooms in the apartments they actually rent. Put these rooms to better use as cargo bike storage.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  23. Comment by Kyle Banerjee June 18, 2018 @ 1:38 pm | Link

    I can believe this is a regular thing though it would take a dedicated person to use his setup.

    He appears to be wearing immersion protection and an inflatable life vest which he'll need if his boat gets swamped -- that thing is going straight to the bottom since it lacks float bags but is hauling some heavy stuff. But he'd burn up wearing that gear anytime except on cold winter days even at an easy pace.

    I've been tracking bike/boat commute scenarios for years and think it could be the best option for individuals with spectacularly bad or nonexistent bridge options since transitions are inherently problematic.

    If there's any way to secure a cheap kayak and bikes near the ends of the water segments, this would be a lot easier to do with two bikes and a boat (or bike share + boat)

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Derailleur history, a biking/boating commute, reckless driving crackdown, and more Array


  24. Comment by paikiala June 18, 2018 @ 1:25 pm | Link

    Actually, the Nilsson power model was only developed in 2004, relatively recently as road design goes.
    Feel free to provide some citations.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


  25. Comment by paikiala June 18, 2018 @ 1:23 pm | Link

    So, 'ideal' conditions.
    Except that most drivers haven't been in a crash, and don't know how fast things can go wrong, so that 'ideal' 85th percentile is a result from users with a large gap in a basic knowledge based for determining what is, or is not, 'safe'.

    In response to ODOT cites high speeds in rejection of lower speed limit request on West Burnside Array


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