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  1. Comment by qqq August 8, 2020 @ 10:39 pm | Link

    You're right the railings are important for how safe people feel. The renderings would be a lot more helpful if they were done from realistic eye levels (per my comment above) because then you could see how they would really look to a user.

    Also, the renderings aren't accurate. You can scale (proportionally) off the black line across the sidewalk/path on the fourth rendering from the top above. The text says the bike lane and sidewalk are each 8' wide, but the sidewalk and bike lane are drawn different widths. If the sidewalk is 8', then the bike lane is more than 9', but the guardrail on the bike lane side is crazily low at less than 2' high. So your comments about low railings are exactly right based on the renderings. Luckily I'm sure Chris below is right--the renderings are conceptual, so don't reflect the railing design except by chance.

    In response to New concept drawings show future bikeway on new Burnside Bridge Array


  2. Comment by Logan Moran August 8, 2020 @ 10:13 pm | Link

    Paintball is serious game man this is not a prank, Ricardo Medina may got deadly injury because of this, seriously dude they have to read some researched data about paintball , I am safety officer you know without proper safety you may even loss your life, there are some data about paintball deaths and injuries please read before doing these pranks.

    In response to Man shot at with paintball gun and assaulted by man driving a car while riding in North Portland Array


  3. Comment by Eawriste August 8, 2020 @ 7:22 pm | Link

    Thanks for your advocacy Lenny. I've been waiting for (and riding on) the npGreenway most of my life.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  4. Comment by Cory P August 8, 2020 @ 3:22 pm | Link

    I'm excited to see a new protected bike facility. Unfortunately, in-ground bicycle sensors will NEVER detect a person on a skateboard. I don't understand why PBOT insists on using sensor tech that doesn't work well with bikes, let alone other road users.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  5. Comment by Eawriste August 8, 2020 @ 2:35 pm | Link

    Remove a lane of traffic for a protected bike lane on Broadway/Weidler so we can use this.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  6. Comment by Lenny Anderson August 8, 2020 @ 2:29 pm | Link

    npGreenway (aka Friends of the North Portland Willamette Greenway Trail) continues to promote its vision of a water level and even River side paved multi-use trail from Kelley Point Park to the Esplanade. Learn more at npGreenway.org
    The Greeley cycle track/sidewalk, while useful as a safer bike/ped facility, is not the Willamette Greenway Trail! We continue to believe that the day will come when a second access road to Swan Island is secured in public ownership, and what is now called the Ash Grove Cement Road will be refitted with a 14' wide true multi-use trail. Meanwhile, its a lovely ride...but watch out for the track crossings and wave to the UPRR crews!
    We are now awaiting PBOT's estimate for the Swan Island segment from the exiting Trail at N. Lagoon Avenue and Ballast to the Waud Bluff Trail. Univ. of Portland is building a section of Trail on its River campus with a new RR crossing at Van Houten. Metro is committed to a full clean up of its Willamette Cove property with provision for the Trail and full public access to the River. And last, but not least, Metro is leading the Columbia Blvd. Bridge/St Johns Prairie project between Chimney Park and a viewpoint in the old landfill. So stuff is happening!
    How can we make faster progress? Join npGreenway! get on our email list and show up when trail funding decisions are on the agenda. Write to your electeds at City Council, Metro and Multnomah county; remind Rep. Blumenauer of our need for climate friendly capital investment. Just insist at every opportunity that this Trail get built!! Help create a wave...politicians will all jump on for the ride.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  7. Comment by mh August 8, 2020 @ 12:26 pm | Link

    Thank you, Peter Koonce.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  8. Comment by was carless August 8, 2020 @ 11:48 am | Link

    Proving time and time again that the United States has teh absolute worst bridge designers.
    These are are awful designs. Overly busy and confusing. Apparently someone wants a tall "iconic" bridge element without understanding what makes a bridge iconic. These designs are reminiscent of the damn London Wedding Cake Bridge.

    I would prefer a nice clean, flat wide lift bridge with well thought out and crafted details on the bridge.

    In response to New concept drawings show future bikeway on new Burnside Bridge Array


  9. Comment by Alan 1.0 August 8, 2020 @ 9:20 am | Link

    I have concerns about how ORS 814.420 would apply in that situation, and I'm quite sure I would not want to test such case as a bicyclist, especially in front of Judge Zusman.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  10. Comment by Pete S. August 8, 2020 @ 7:49 am | Link

    0/10 terrible take. Cops are dorks, even the unpaid ones posting on internet forums.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  11. Comment by Jimmy August 8, 2020 @ 2:41 am | Link

    Another clear effort that civic engineers do not commute by bike. These signals are such a headache for most people. You would be better off adopting a water like riding style and learn to weave thru traffic. Alas, keep trying better signal alignment and foresee lane building that does not require what seems like 6 lanes to make it across to the next lane.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  12. Comment by Hello, Kitty August 7, 2020 @ 9:52 pm | Link

    Oh crap! Now you tell me.

    In response to The 'Rainbow Road' on SE Ankeny is Portland's best distanced-dining street plaza Array


  13. Comment by Middle of the Road Guy August 7, 2020 @ 6:45 pm | Link

    I know...but when I read "most inept leader in history", Wheeler came to mind.

    In response to Woman assaulted while biking on Columbia Slough path Array


  14. Comment by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) August 7, 2020 @ 5:22 pm | Link

    I posted video on my Instagram story yesterday. Will upload and share here ASAP.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  15. Comment by was carless August 7, 2020 @ 4:07 pm | Link

    You must be new to Portland and bridge maintenance 101. Multnomah County continually does maintenance, inspections and repairs on ALL of the bridges across the river. This includes repainting - they have repainted all of the bridges across the Willamette twice over the past 20 years alone (they just finishes repainting the Ross Island). They are not going to stop doing maintenance even if they are planning on replacing the bridge as 1) you won't know for sure you can even replace the bridge until you get a funding package approved by the voters, 2) you don't want the bridge to fall in the water as construction for a bridge replacement will take well over 5 years to complete.

    2002 was 18 years ago, of course they had to continue doing maintenance on the bridge. Since they haven't replaced the bridge, they needed to continue to do maintenance, otherwise the lift mechanism would have failed somewhere around 2008.

    In response to New concept drawings show future bikeway on new Burnside Bridge Array


  16. Comment by PATRICK August 7, 2020 @ 4:05 pm | Link

    I'd like to see more photos of what the other two lights on the signal look like.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  17. Comment by Another Engineer August 7, 2020 @ 4:01 pm | Link

    Couldn't agree more, the blue bike detector indication lights on the west head of the Sellwood Bridge, ODOT owned, still aren't on because they're not FHWA approved.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  18. Comment by Mike August 7, 2020 @ 4:01 pm | Link

    The cyclists at this intersection aren't the problem! The No Turn on Red sign should be much larger and illuminated. I've had to yell at a number of cars from not turning on red. The turn lane closest to the bike lane is the worse! Not sure if larger or brighter signs will do the trick but it would help.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  19. Comment by todd/boulanger August 7, 2020 @ 3:55 pm | Link

    Thanks Portland (PBoT) for pushing ahead on these incremental innovations. I remember fondly our 2006 city study tour to the Netherlands (with Mayor Adams and BTA) to investigates these very common safety tools for bikes.

    But I am so 'pissed' that the FHA / FHWA is taking decades to move forward on these well used and documented (outside of US) tools and treatments. Sadly if it is an international best practice developed elsewhere then its is as if it cannot be easily transferred to the US. It seems FHA/ FHWA will move heaven and earth for new autonomous vehicle tools / practices and anything for motorized vehicles but ped and bike treatments have to 'go slow'.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  20. Comment by Thomas August 7, 2020 @ 3:35 pm | Link

    Hey Jonathan, very cool pics! But how about some video of it in action? Trigger it and then let it step through its process so we can see see the full show! Thanks.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  21. Comment by Anon August 7, 2020 @ 3:24 pm | Link

    I'm trying to understand how this excessively pedantic commentary is supposed to be helpful. Most people will call it a "sensor" or "sensor pad" or something to that effect (and it is a sensor). How it's implemented, however technically interesting, is really irrelevant, or at least it should be. The only thing that matters is that it's located in the right place, it's marked, and that it works.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  22. Comment by Anon August 7, 2020 @ 3:19 pm | Link

    And no matter what people do or don't say, you will generally have a negative comment about it.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  23. Comment by maxD August 7, 2020 @ 3:12 pm | Link

    I would give this 0/10 from a driving perspective. The median driving speeds before the project were over 55 mph in each direction. A woman and her daughter were killed in their van due to dangerous driving at high speeds. This occurred while there was plenty of time to revisit this design to consider lower speeds, few lanes, a traffic signal at the on-ramp, making the driving lanes more narrow, or basically any consideration of safety during the design. I asked tehm to consider this road from a Vision Zero perspective and was told they would not. In fact, the project removed bikes AND WIDENED lanes which will likely increase driving speeds. PBOT took a fast and deadly street, and redesigned it to be faster for the express purpose of satisfying freight, and in the face of community members asking for lower speeds. The bike infrastructure is really bad, but the driving infrastructure is totally crazy.

    In response to The North Greeley separated bike path is finally open! Array


  24. Comment by Momo August 7, 2020 @ 3:10 pm | Link

    It doesn't literally tell you how long, but it's still a huge help to have some sense of how long it will be in rough percentage terms, as opposed to just sitting there waiting and wondering and getting frustrated.

    Countdown timers are only possible with fixed-time signals like we have downtown. Any signal that is actuated with loop detectors has variable times depending on demand, so there's no way to generate a countdown with a specific number of seconds. These dots are showing a dynamic percentage of remaining cycle length.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


  25. Comment by Momo August 7, 2020 @ 3:07 pm | Link

    We've had one of these for years at the diagonal crossing in the Rose Quarter, though it's sometimes hard to see across the intersection. That one is an actual signal from the Netherlands which originally said "WACHT" (meaning wait) but with some handy black tape to cover up the C and part of the H, it now says WAIT. Because of the variability in cycle length there, the countdown dots sometimes count down in big chunks, so it's not the ideal location for it. Hopefully this new American take on the Dutch signal at Broadway & Williams will be more consistent of a countdown. It does seem like the cycle length is more predictable there.

    I personally love this style of signal. It really helps psychologically to have some sense of how long you might have to wait at a traffic signal.

    In response to Nifty new bike signal added to Broadway/Williams intersection Array


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