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  1. Comment by Zach Katz November 30, 2021 @ 3:03 pm | Link

    I did move, but I still have the money in safekeeping and it will be used for its intended purpose (or refunded). Update forthcoming!

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  2. Comment by Watts November 30, 2021 @ 3:01 pm | Link

    So what, exactly, is the cost of free parking? Could you give me an estimate of how much you think the city will spend over the next year, or decade, if you prefer, for the parking on Hawthorne, compared to the cost of doing something different with the space?

    My bet is that free parking is in fact the cheapest option, by far.

    (And, to answer your question, most parking was preserved.)

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  3. Comment by hamiramani November 30, 2021 @ 2:43 pm | Link

    I live a block from Hawthorne so I interface with the streetscape regularly.

    Is it better? Yes. But is that what we're going for? Why not choose to make this area excellent?

    Sadly, Hawthorne remains a car sewer. The car fumes literally stink up the place and the noise pollution can be quite revolting. The parked cars add to the hostile environment. The sidewalks are cramped and clearly do not serve the relatively large number of people walking (especially at holiday time). The few intersections that now have crosswalks with a pedestrian island feel safer. Yet, this is a very small number of intersections. If PBOT is interested in providing safe crossings then EVERY intersection should have crosswalks and pedestrian islands on BOTH sides of the intersection (ie, east and west).

    We can have a people-centered Hawthorne if our leaders chose human-scale design over cars.

    Do PBOT staff ever go to intersections and observe for a few minutes (hours?). It doesn't take very long before one starts to see a person trying to cross have to meekly wait for a parade of drivers before one decides to stop or until there's a gap; it doesn't take long to witness someone trying to bike on Hawthorne (how dare they?) get hunted from behind by a driver that just can't wait to get to the next red light; it doesn't take long to witness the all-so-important center turn-lane get abused by drivers trying to pass a bus or even another driver who may actually have some sense of humanity.

    Let's get rid of the center turn lane; it's not needed most of the the time anyway.
    Let's get rid of ANY turning off Hawthorne except at arterials like Cesar Chavez.
    Let's narrow the travel lanes to reduce the possibility of speeding.
    Let's give people walking some freakin' breathing room.

    We can make Hawthorne a more hospitable place for people, but that means there will have to be fewer cars; it will mean lower speeds.

    When will we have people streets?

    In response to The contentious 'Hawthorne Pave and Paint' project is complete Array


  4. Comment by soren November 30, 2021 @ 2:38 pm | Link

    I believe our only path forward is a systemic approach based on the climate science consensus (e.g. the mitigation pathways in the SR1.5 and forthcoming AR6). Limiting our focus to "fossil fuel production" or transportation (e.g. a "transition") is nowhere near enough to prevent ever more grotesque ecocide:

    Cutting emissions to zero by 2030 to meet the 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) target will be exceptionally difficult, said lead author Jonathan Lamontagne of Tufts University. And there is no path to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit given the constraints used in the paper, he said.

    That finding echoes the IPCC Special Report, which found the only way to keep global warming to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit was the use of large-scale carbon removal, either from engineered technologies like direct air capture or biomass energy with carbon capture and sequestration, or from natural climate solutions such as afforestation, said Glen Peters, research director at Norway’s Center for International Climate Research. That was also the case for nearly all 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit scenarios, Peters said via email

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/climate-change-model-warns-of-difficult-future

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  5. Comment by Zach Katz November 30, 2021 @ 2:33 pm | Link

    The Grid. The most important enabler of mass cycling, but a cycling concept which is often misunderstood: http://www.aviewfromthecyclepath.com/2015/05/the-grid-most-important-enabler-of-mass.html

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  6. Comment by cmh89 November 30, 2021 @ 2:30 pm | Link

    You expect the project to be built without light rail or improved bike facilities?

    I'd say there's maybe a 25% it gets built with light rail. The most likely outcome is buses get lanes on the bridge and then sit in the traffic crunch like everyone else.

    I'd say there is 0% chance of improvement for bicycle/pedestrian access between Portland and Vancouver. I'd guess the same thing, some dedicated lanes on the bridge that connect to infrastructure ranging from bad to outright dangerous on either side. Unless I'm missing something I haven't seen any plans that indicate how the bike infra on the bridge will connect with the rest of our "bike network". Just another waste of money to build an island of safety no one can use.

    In response to Metro opens comment period, will delay vote on $35 million in I-5 project planning Array


  7. Comment by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 30, 2021 @ 2:29 pm | Link

    We're working on a story about that Sigma. Stay tuned.

    In response to The contentious 'Hawthorne Pave and Paint' project is complete Array


  8. Comment by nic.cota November 30, 2021 @ 2:28 pm | Link

    We really missed the chance to fundamentally change an inner Portland commercial corridor with direct access for bike users.

    Albeit the crossings do feel MUCH safer. But that being said, they would have felt safer with parking-protected bike lanes, too...

    It took the world to bend PBOT into considering it, and then when they seceded, they managed to pick what was going to happen from the get-go and justified it with a very misleading survey.

    I see why Zach left.

    In response to The contentious 'Hawthorne Pave and Paint' project is complete Array


  9. Comment by dirk November 30, 2021 @ 2:26 pm | Link

    didn't zach katz skip town with everyones money?

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  10. Comment by soren November 30, 2021 @ 2:22 pm | Link

    Portland's only inventory of consumption-based emissions was conducted prior to the 2015 climate action plan release (data up to 2013). Prior to its CAP release, Portland made a committment, as a member of the C40 coalition, to track and reduce its consumption emissions. Unfortunately Portland has failed to conduct additional inventories in two subsequent updates and has stonewalled/ignored requests by activists (including me) to explain this failure*. The 2013 dated CAP inventory showed that Portland's consumption-based emissions dwarfed sector/production-based emissions# and that most of these emissions came from consumption by Portland metro residents.

    https://i.ibb.co/GQkNQsJ/image.png

    https://www.c40knowledgehub.org/s/article/Data-story-what-Portland-learnt-from-their-consumption-based-emissions-inventory?language=en_US

    *The State of OR has continued to conduct consumption-based inventories (see above) so Portland's refusal to address this issue indicates intentionality.

    #There are methodological limitations to Portland's pre 2015 consumption inventory and its likely that a scientifically rigorous analysis would find higher emissions.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: 'From gridlock to greatness', Apple iBike, cycling through grief, and more Array


  11. Comment by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) November 30, 2021 @ 1:51 pm | Link

    That's because Oregon already had a program like that... The Oregon Scenic Bikeways https://traveloregon.com/things-to-do/outdoor-recreation/bicycling/road-biking/ride-oregon-scenic-bikeways/

    Still though, I think ODOT should do more with Adventure Cycling on that program to make sure we are in the official national network.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: 'From gridlock to greatness', Apple iBike, cycling through grief, and more Array


  12. Comment by soren November 30, 2021 @ 1:48 pm | Link

    In my experience, crossing Hawthorne at 25th no longer feels stressful or dangerous and drivers are far more considerate all along Hawthorne. (I noticed the same phenomenon when Division's 4 lanes* were shrunk to 2 lanes.) In contrast to the claims of "Healthier Hawthorne" supporters, traffic speeds have plummeted during periods of congestion and, anecdotally, have decreased during other periods. My primary concern about this road diet is that line 14 will experience delays due to the dramatic increase in congestion during peak hours. It's maddening that PBOT favored private SUV/truck/(sedan) parking over installation of dedicated bus lanes on one of Portland's most important transit routes.

    *two of the lanes were temporary lanes but they were filled with speeding cars during periods of high use.

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  13. Comment by Sigma November 30, 2021 @ 1:41 pm | Link

    Just about $13K raised on gofundme for the lawsuit that was supposed to compel bike lanes. What happens to that money?

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  14. Comment by ivan November 30, 2021 @ 1:37 pm | Link

    Apart from whether or not Hawthorne has PBLs, I still find it bizarre that they didn't continue this project on down to 12th Avenue, since the stretch from 12th to 20th is particularly ludicrous and dangerous to have as two lanes in each direction, and they had a parallel project going from 12th to Grand.

    (I also don't get why this project went to 23rd instead of to 20th, but maybe it's something about the curve at the light.)

    Does anyone know if PBOT has decided whether/when to complete this safety gap?

    Anyway, as several folks have said, it's a lot better than it was but so much less better than it could have been.

    In response to The contentious 'Hawthorne Pave and Paint' project is complete Array


  15. Comment by eawriste November 30, 2021 @ 1:36 pm | Link

    PBOT's MO is a sort of plans-with-no-teeth, scattered incrementalism. There is no intention for building a network of protected bike lanes. There is no real effort to build the 2030 bike plan ("What is that?"). And there is just enough support for putting sharrows on residential streets from people who bike and the general public to make practical, direct, and safe infrastructure seem like a radical idea. The best hope for building a safe network is through an organized, and well-funded group (such as TA in NYC), which I hope Bikeloud may some day become.

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  16. Comment by rick November 30, 2021 @ 1:34 pm | Link

    How many car parking spots were removed? Is it one partial victory? There's a high cost for free and maybe very cheap car parking.

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  17. Comment by ivan November 30, 2021 @ 1:31 pm | Link

    On the US Bicycle Route System, I wasn't that familiar with it, but it's interesting that Oregon has zero such routes:

    https://www.adventurecycling.org/routes-and-maps/us-bicycle-route-system/maps-and-route-resources/

    In response to The Monday Roundup: 'From gridlock to greatness', Apple iBike, cycling through grief, and more Array


  18. Comment by Watts November 30, 2021 @ 1:26 pm | Link

    The project also isn’t slated to improve public transit nor bicycle access between Portland and Vancouver.

    You expect the project to be built without light rail or improved bike facilities? I can't even imagine that happening (though we can debate whether a much higher climb is a worthwhile tradeoff for not feeling like you're going to pitch head-first off the bridge and into the Columbia).

    In response to Metro opens comment period, will delay vote on $35 million in I-5 project planning Array


  19. Comment by David Hampsten November 30, 2021 @ 1:21 pm | Link

    I can see both the OTC and Metro having "emergency" votes in favor of the CRC2 by or before Christmas, but really it's up to your very conservative Democratic legislature to make the final decisions on what stroads and highways will get funded. I shouldn't expect much for alternative transportation funding, not from the OTC nor the Oregon Legislature.

    If bike/walk advocates want something funded beyond the usual pittance, they need to work together (I know, that is already an impossibility) to develop a package that has "transformative" projects in as many legislative districts statewide as possible, including "rural" towns and counties. Remember that even Republicans and conservative right-wing Democrats will support bike and walk infrastructure projects if they are serving the right purposes - tourism, economic development, recreation routes for hunters, safe riding to the house of faith of their choice, and so on.

    In response to Time to tell ODOT how they should spend $1.2 billion Array


  20. Comment by Watts November 30, 2021 @ 1:16 pm | Link

    The crosswalks on "lower Hawthorne" that the surrounding neighborhood associations fought for so long to get are installed and are a FANTASTIC improvement over the situation before. I crossed at one yesterday, and it felt so much safer than the old configuration. Originally I was hoping for flashing beacons, but they really don't seem necessary.

    I haven't yet tried riding further up yet; the 4-lane configuration let me take the lane and vehicles could pass so it felt ok. I hope things are still chill with the new configuration.

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  21. Comment by ROH November 30, 2021 @ 1:11 pm | Link

    I think the point is that our roads do not set us up for success. They rely heavily on all drivers “doing the right thing” in complex situations. If we rely on everyone to drive 25 on streets that easily accommodate 35, or to fully stop at every stop sign then we are fooling ourselves. Yes, many, maybe even most follow rules, but that’s not the point ; Enough people drive too fast, or are confused by poorly designed intersections or drive not expecting bikers or pedestrians in the street because there are no sidewalks or poor bike facilities. If streets with a 25 mph speed limit were narrower we wouldn’t need as much enforcement because most people would feel uncomfortable going faster. And sure, there will always be people who just ignore rules and drive too fast, run red lights, text and drive, drink and drive, which is why there will never be 0 crashes. But if you change the geometry of the streets, people will slow down because they won’t feel safe driving faster.

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  22. Comment by cmh89 November 30, 2021 @ 1:03 pm | Link

    most routes with sufficient demand are already being served

    What? LOL. There are tens of thousands of underserved people on the peninsula that aren't connected in any meaningful to the rest of the city.

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  23. Comment by cmh89 November 30, 2021 @ 12:57 pm | Link

    I will continue to avoid shopping on Hawthorne. I basically avoid that area because of how bad the bike infrastructure is there.

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  24. Comment by nuovorecord November 30, 2021 @ 12:56 pm | Link

    Metro isn't spending a dime here. This is ODOT's money. But Metro controls the regional spending plan (MTIP). If funding for any major project isn't included in the MTIP project list, then the funding can't be spent that project until it is.

    That's the issue. Metro Council can deny ODOT's project's funding being added to the MTIP.

    And many of the bicycle projects in the region have been paid for through the money Metro does control, just so that's clear. Trails, Greenways...lots of local bicycle improvements are funded through Metro's Regional Flexible Funds.

    In response to Metro opens comment period, will delay vote on $35 million in I-5 project planning Array


  25. Comment by ivan November 30, 2021 @ 12:54 pm | Link

    Awesome!

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