Comments

At BikePortland, we think your comments are just as important as our stories. This page lists all comments made on BikePortland.org, with recent comments at the top.

If you love great comments, check out our Comment of the Week column, where we highlight the best ones (and even pay $5 to its author!).

Return to the Front Page.


  1. Comment by soren April 23, 2017 @ 7:54 pm | Link

    "I don’t think the 98% necessarily prefer to ride through crowds of pedestrians, they just don’t"

    there are no crowds of pedestrians on better naito during work day commute hours. methinks that experienced year-round commuters doth protest too much.

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  2. Comment by Kyle Banerjee April 23, 2017 @ 5:08 pm | Link

    That would (or at least should) look totally different. The problem with Better Naito is that it converts a reasonably decent bike and auto lane into a free for all MUP.

    One lane in each direction would provide plenty of space for one way bike traffic separated from two way ped traffic.

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  3. Comment by Kyle Banerjee April 23, 2017 @ 5:04 pm | Link

    Confused people. Fortunately, very few of them drive cars.

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  4. Comment by 9watts April 23, 2017 @ 5:02 pm | Link

    An excellent piece. Thanks for sharing.

    In response to Beyond vandalism, Biketown faces ridership test ahead of summer season Array


  5. Comment by Eric Leifsdad April 23, 2017 @ 4:55 pm | Link

    BSNYC on the first year of citi bike share: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/24/opinion/bike-shares-rough-ride.html

    In response to Beyond vandalism, Biketown faces ridership test ahead of summer season Array


  6. Comment by dwk April 23, 2017 @ 4:52 pm | Link

    Personally, I think cycling needs to be focused on transportation rather than recreation...
    Almost everyone at some point in their lives in America has recreated on bicycles.
    The Waterfront in Portland has about 5 or 6 miles of MUP.
    People who commute pretty much use just Naito.
    Can't we just have that and not the share our little lane with waterfront tourist crowd?

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  7. Comment by Eli Spevak April 23, 2017 @ 3:05 pm | Link

    Any paved streets are eligible? Or just those lacking curbs/sidewalks but that are paved down the middle?

    In response to How I worked with PBOT to build a 'play street' in my neighborhood Array


  8. Comment by John Liu April 23, 2017 @ 2:49 pm | Link

    More streets should be like this (the winding, play aspect). It naturally slows drivers down.

    In response to How I worked with PBOT to build a 'play street' in my neighborhood Array


  9. Comment by 9watts April 23, 2017 @ 12:03 pm | Link

    "What would constitute a properly qualified statement in this case?"
    To answer this I think we need to first come to terms with why we're interested in this subject, what about it seems usefully highlighted. For me, I'm (always) interested in the outliers and what we might learn from them.

    Stab at qualified statement: While the level of inflation-adjusted income the poor receive may have increased on average, the spread within that portion of the population has increased to the extent that there are today more people who we may think of as destitute (homeless, hungry, kicked to the curb) than at any other time since WWII.

    In response to Mayor Wheeler on autonomous vehicles: Portland is "open for business" Array


  10. Comment by Doug April 23, 2017 @ 9:13 am | Link

    Evening auto traffic out of downtown is significantly slowed by the current closure of several Morrison Bridge lanes, resulting in slowed traffic on the Hawthorne Bridge, which I have ridden past, and probably the Burnside as well.

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  11. Comment by Esther April 23, 2017 @ 8:41 am | Link

    Awesome!! Just a note getting a notarization can be free... Just go to your bank and there's usually a notary on shift.

    In response to How I worked with PBOT to build a 'play street' in my neighborhood Array


  12. Comment by core:aggregator:record-not-finalized April 23, 2017 @ 12:00 am | Link

    Import records must be finalized before posts can be inserted.

    In response to Record: schedule facebook daily 195647 Array


  13. Comment by wsbob April 22, 2017 @ 11:01 pm | Link

    "...The trail guidelines contained in the FPNRMP do not allow a bicycle on anything narrower than an 8-foot trail bed of gravel or hard-packed dirt.

    Putting aside the fact that the word “singletrack” does not even appear in the FPNRMP, it’s clear that the Plan authors were very much anticipating and trying to account for off-road cycling. ..." greenstadt

    daniel...you were clear enough, which is why I wrote what I did in the comment via this link:

    https://bikeportland.org/2017/04/10/guest-post-hopes-and-concerns-for-forest-park-loom-over-off-road-cycling-plan-224391#comment-6796492

    There's no mandate in the plan that the city use Forest Park for 'mountain biking', other than the off-road biking type of mountain biking the park already has provided. I guess that has something to do with why you keep coming back trying to persuade me that the city is somehow required by law, or something, to use this park for mountain biking. So everyone knows exactly what you're talking about, maybe come up with some clear definitions of other types of mountain biking you believe the park should be used for, and submit that to city hall or portland parks, as a proposed mandate.

    If you really feel the city is depriving you of some right to use the park for mountain biking, maybe you have grounds for a suit, a class action suit.

    You don't have to persuade me on what seem to me to be questionable merits of using Forest Park for mountain biking, and that's a good thing. I'm an independent on that question. I don't live in the city, don't know anyone on the FP Conservancy, or city council. To get what you're seeking, you and other mountain bike enthusiasts in favor of this use, probably have got to persuade a majority of the people residing in Portland, that your idea is a good one.

    In response to Guest post: Hopes and concerns for Forest Park loom over off-road cycling plan Array


  14. Comment by soren April 22, 2017 @ 9:27 pm | Link

    the southbound bike lane on naito is unaffected.

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  15. Comment by bjorn April 22, 2017 @ 7:53 pm | Link

    Really explains the thinking behind how we ended up with a bunch of people living on culdesacs who want to drive 50 on division as they head into the city.

    In response to Metro's new Vision Zero video is brilliant Array


  16. Comment by Dave April 22, 2017 @ 5:50 pm | Link

    It's crazy how even a small project like this can become intensely political. I love that you stuck with it and pulled it off.

    In response to How I worked with PBOT to build a 'play street' in my neighborhood Array


  17. Comment by OrganicBrian April 22, 2017 @ 5:32 pm | Link

    I noticed today she's radically changed her appearance (and wouldn't you?). I can't attach an image to a BP comment, but here's the link to her current FB profile pic:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1751976301780715&

    In response to Portland Police arrest woman after she bragged about road rage assault online Array


  18. Comment by Mossby Pomegranate April 22, 2017 @ 1:59 pm | Link

    As is a vast majority of east Portland.

    In response to 'Green Loop' takes center stage at Design Week Portland Array


  19. Comment by Wells April 22, 2017 @ 1:52 pm | Link

    Perhaps the most important use for electric cars is their compatibility with regional utility grids. They offer households the choice to use their stored electricity either for driving or household electric appliances and electronic devices. Matching rooftop solar to an EV battery pack leads to how such household power supply systems may complement the grid, especially in an emergency grid failure.

    In response to First look: The Willamette riverfront path that Tesla built Array


  20. Comment by Randy April 22, 2017 @ 1:36 pm | Link

    With few safe routes to get to the Loyd district from the south, it remains an island.
    The intersections 12th/Burnside and 12th/NE Loyd remain unsafe for cyclists.

    In response to 'Green Loop' takes center stage at Design Week Portland Array


  21. Comment by Hello, Kitty April 22, 2017 @ 1:00 pm | Link

    "Poor Americans" is an aggregate group. The fact that it is a general statement, rather than a statement intended to encompass every qualifying individual should be obvious. You would accept the statement "smoking causes cancer" without qualification, even though, in the majority of cases, it does not.

    What would constitute a properly qualified statement in this case?

    In response to Mayor Wheeler on autonomous vehicles: Portland is "open for business" Array


  22. Comment by 9watts April 22, 2017 @ 12:11 pm | Link

    "it is necessary to make some generalizations and use some aggregate measures"

    Perhaps but there is no requirement that one omit qualifications. It is important when relying on these averages to be wary of what they may obscure.

    "I am not making the claim that every individual is better off than they were 20 years ago."

    Well you actually did just say: "materially, poor Americans are better off today than they were in the past." and "the absolute value of material wealth of the poor has also increased."

    In response to Mayor Wheeler on autonomous vehicles: Portland is "open for business" Array


  23. Comment by Hello, Kitty April 22, 2017 @ 12:03 pm | Link

    I am not making the claim that every individual is better off than they were 20 years ago. When talking about a population of 300M, it is necessary to make some generalizations and use some aggregate measures. Measures of inequality, too, require on averages and general statements, that may well not apply to individual cases.

    In response to Mayor Wheeler on autonomous vehicles: Portland is "open for business" Array


  24. Comment by El Biciclero April 22, 2017 @ 11:36 am | Link

    Well, this is a preference between two arguably bad choices. It really comes down to one thing: speed.

    Until we rearrange everything to create affordable and tolerable living space within 20 minutes' walking distance of everything people need, there will be a desire to travel faster than walking speed. How can we possibly do that safely? Drivers, when not limited by other traffic, can travel at least 20 mph, and have most "obstructions" signalized and legalized out of their way most of the time. Do we assume that if people have places to go, they will just drive a car, and if they are on a bike, they must not have anywhere to really be, and won't mind traveling at walking speed? Why, as a bicyclist, should I only have a choice between going 20 mph or going 4 mph?

    I don't think the 98% necessarily prefer to ride through crowds of pedestrians, they just don't, under any circumstances, want to be anywhere near "cars"---and wobbling around pedestrians is the only alternative ever provided. Why do we outlaw riding on sidewalks, but then expect bicyclists to share essentially a sidewalk with pedestrians in spaces like this? Why is it only "semi-legal" for me to use an alternate route to go faster than 4 mph? If we gave bicyclists the same treatment we afford drivers---a relatively clear path, with only traffic of a similar nature (i.e., other bicycles), moving at speeds of 10-15 mph that was wide enough to overtake safely at more than 4 mph---then we'd have a better choice. I mean, if we're doing segregated, why only go halfway?

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


  25. Comment by Kyle Banerjee April 22, 2017 @ 11:17 am | Link

    Probably because they're a total waste of money, reduce the ability to adapt to specific circumstances, take loads of space, and are ugly.

    If we really need concrete barriers for protection from cars moving at parking lot speeds in an area with no cross streets or hook potential and alternative routes nearby, there is truly no hope for cycling.

    For the same money that they make an area temporarily more comfortable for people that don't ride, they could permanently make another area safer and more rideable.

    Given how crowded it gets, it's better if fair attendees walk that area rather than bike. It's not like walking the entire length (presuming they even want to go that far) takes significantly longer than riding it.

    In response to A protected bike lane is born: 'Better Naito' is being installed right now Array


Comments