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  1. Comment by FrogBoiler February 20, 2020 @ 1:45 pm | Link

    I've use this intersection several times a week for the past 15 years or so. It's a big improvement, but I wonder why didn't they just put a crossing light there? It's still an awkward intersection with poor sight lines, and I still see motorists whipping around the curve (north/south traffic) much too quickly.

    I always tell my kids to cross 21st a block or two north, since they'll have better views of oncoming traffic in all directions, and these changes at Tillamook don't change my mind on that strategy.

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  2. Comment by Hello, Kitty February 20, 2020 @ 1:44 pm | Link

    I don't mean to discount the harm (most of which comes from taller vehicles, which are in fact already prohibited from parking near corners by a largely unenforced Portland law), but I am hard pressed to think it's worse than, or even close to as bad as the harms I cited.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  3. Comment by Hello, Kitty February 20, 2020 @ 1:34 pm | Link

    Ooooh... a new type of marking! Exciting!

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  4. Comment by Cyclekrieg February 20, 2020 @ 1:24 pm | Link

    I liked more. Bring on equal objectification!

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  5. Comment by Cyclekrieg February 20, 2020 @ 1:22 pm | Link

    Shimran George
    Let’s go to these places and see what’s they’re doing right.

    I can answer that without you having to go anywhere.

    1) Other places are willing to learn from the people that are doing it already, regardless of politics, geography or commonality. There was no "smug bubble", no "but its from flyover country" excuses, no "we are a unique and beautiful snowflake". One of failures of the ORCMP is its unwillingness to discuss what works in other locations.
    2) Other places hire people that have done this before, not the locals or a big name. NW Arkansas has lots of Wal-Mart money, but they didn't pretend they knew how to do this. They hired people who cut their teeth making great urban trails in MI, MN, WI, GA, & TN. Look at the complete death trap the proposed RVNA trail layout is and ask yourself: "Would that look the same if someone with knowledge of urban hiker/biker trails had designed it?"
    3) Other cities said 'yes' to small projects and learned from them. Instead of having a big complicated and toothless process that gives voice to every anti in the city (or as in Portland, the same dozen antis) the cities said 'yes' at one small project and proved it could be done. They used that project to work out the bugs. Then they applied that success to the next place and so on and so forth.

    If you as Portland MTBers want to change things they are going to have to do the above 3 things and 1 other: willingness to get active in force. I can guarantee you that if Commissioners woke up Saturday morning with 300 MTBers laying siege to their house like a medieval castle and that became an every Saturday thing till the situation changed, mountain biking trails are coming way sooner. Squeaky wheel gets the grease.

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  6. Comment by John Lascurettes February 20, 2020 @ 1:19 pm | Link

    Driving it north-south, I like it better. it keeps the drivers in their lane position better throughout their traversal.

    Regarding the tilted green stripes, I had assumed it was to match the path of car tires going through the intersection at the point of overlap such that the grinding down of the pattern is minimized.
    ¯_(ツ)_/¯

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  7. Comment by Champs February 20, 2020 @ 1:13 pm | Link

    After Williams to NE 7th, it's pretty interesting how much the traffic calming changes once you cross into Irvington.

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  8. Comment by PDXCyclist February 20, 2020 @ 1:12 pm | Link

    I know I'm on a complaining roll, but I also wish PBOT would pick a single bike crossing signage/marking method (green bar with white edges) and stick with it uniformly.

    At first glance saw that and thought the construction installing the crossbikes was drunk or something--which isn't fair to the construction person. It was a deliberate PBOT design choice! Predictability is good

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  9. Comment by Michael Mann February 20, 2020 @ 1:10 pm | Link

    Absolutely the way to do it. The history of our republic is rich with examples of how to move unwieldy bureaucracies in the direction of justice by hitting them hard in the wallet. If the City of Portland didn't see this coming, shame on them. They had ample warning.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  10. Comment by John Lascurettes February 20, 2020 @ 1:09 pm | Link

    I know for sure that the police weren't there to witness it first hand. I didn't know if they had taken any statements from anyone that wasn't in the truck that hit the cyclist until Dan commented. Dan says his husband witnessed it firsthand at the time of the collision. I have no reason to not believe him on that. I do find it incredulous when police write it as fact when the only source is from the driver who has a vested interest in distorting facts (and no statement from the unconscious rider).

    In response to Man riding a bicycle dies after collision with a truck driver in Goose Hollow Array


  11. Comment by PDXCyclist February 20, 2020 @ 1:02 pm | Link

    I'll have to check it out in person but just based on the photos I'm confused why PBOT spent all this money on a refuge island, new curb cuts, etc and still designed them so that the geometry channelizes car drivers at high speed turning right. I'm referencing the last photo in Maus's article. It looks like a slip lane to me.

    If we spent all this money removing a tree, adding new concrete, refuge island, etc, why not square up the intersection as much as possible?

    Anyways, it may just be the angle of the photo. I'll have to check it out in person.

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  12. Comment by John February 20, 2020 @ 1:01 pm | Link

    JF is right, Johnno is way off and obviously never ridden in the Midwest. Midwest: Single track, way better then Oregon, always has been. Group road rides hell yeah, take the whole road with a sweet echelon, because there might be one car an hour that happens to be going the other way. There is typically a quiet paved road every square mile. The only thing Oregon might have going for it now, is that the mountain bike technology has caught up to Mountain style terrain and more trails are being built. But who likes to drive to ride?. But road riding has always been horrid in pdx area. Commuting's OK, but that's dying off too as millennials won't ride a bicycle and love their electric cars.

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  13. Comment by Sam February 20, 2020 @ 1:00 pm | Link

    OK hot-stuff...

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  14. Comment by Catie February 20, 2020 @ 1:00 pm | Link

    This is SUCH an improvement over PBOT's initial proposed design. I rode Tillamook on Monday and a car actually stopped for me. I hope PBOT does a speed study to show before/after changes. Portland has lots of offsets intersections like this.

    In response to First Look: Big changes to key crossing of NE Tillamook at 21st Array


  15. Comment by mh February 20, 2020 @ 12:45 pm | Link

    Believe what you want, but I believe Scott's main motivation IS an improved city for vulnerable road users. The time and money he spends on Oregon Walks suggests that some of his percentage of that settlement (assuming a win for the full amount) would go to advocacy organizations (and advertising in BikePortland). I don't begrudge a bit of it.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  16. Comment by Babygorilla February 20, 2020 @ 12:36 pm | Link

    Also, I agree with the yes. This should be a PBOT priority to improve intersection sightlines and I wonder if there is a huge unknown cost that's kept this issue unaddressed.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  17. Comment by JP February 20, 2020 @ 12:32 pm | Link

    Not a bro, and I've actually been to law school, so I think I'm good.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  18. Comment by Babygorilla February 20, 2020 @ 12:31 pm | Link

    Its been a bit since I looked at the details, but I was under the impression that to comply with the state law, a ton of parking signs and markings that allow for parking right up to the intersection would have to be removed (since the placement of those signs is what exempts the city from the state law).

    I think tele / power companys have databases to inventory their street poles. I would be curious if Portland has a similar database for its parking signage or whehter PBOT has put together any cost estimates for getting that sort of system in place or for getting citywide new signage and markings that respsect the state law.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  19. Comment by Gary B February 20, 2020 @ 12:25 pm | Link

    There's not really a way to formally "support the lawsuit." It couldn't make for a class action, and the separate facts of your case wouldn't bear on this one. But it sounds like you may have a case of your own. You should probably reach out to an attorney to discuss your case, and it seems like Mr. Kocher would be a good option. He'd be able to manage the two cases together to potentially acheive a better result (e..g, he'd have more leverage to force the City to change if he's settling 2 suits instead of one).

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  20. Comment by q February 20, 2020 @ 12:24 pm | Link

    Scott, I also referenced that PBOT map, but it shows SW Vista at the crash location as 25 mph. Are you saying the map is wrong?

    If it's wrong, that's bad on PBOT's part. Also, it adds a PBOT component to this fatality. So many times with Portland traffic fatalities, we find out (usually only on bikeportland) that a crash site has been identified or even scheduled for improvements that may have prevented the crash, but they weren't done yet.

    Also, the reporting (if the street really should be 20 mph) should state that the current speed limit is 20, but the signs haven't yet been changed. It also means the driver's estimated speed of 25-30 could have been 33% above the limit.

    In response to Man riding a bicycle dies after collision with a truck driver in Goose Hollow Array


  21. Comment by GlowBoy February 20, 2020 @ 12:23 pm | Link

    That would be true, if female objectification of men were a rampant problem, causing similar levels of harm to men.

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  22. Comment by Gary B February 20, 2020 @ 12:20 pm | Link

    @HK I wish they'd enforce those things, too. But this isn't even about enforcement, it's about not putting parking signs in the wrong place. The vast majority of people comply with parking signs. Setting them back from intersecitons would be a huge improvement, without a lick of extra enforcement.

    And, for the record, you seem to be really underrating the harm caused by the practice. There are the physical harms, like the victim in this case and the commenter above, and presumably others. Then, e.g., there are also the countless pedestrians who can't safely cross a street because drivers can't see them when they enter the crosswalk.

    In response to $5.9 million lawsuit says City of Portland is negligent for allowing parking at intersections Array


  23. Comment by GlowBoy February 20, 2020 @ 12:20 pm | Link

    That seems to be correct.

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  24. Comment by GlowBoy February 20, 2020 @ 12:18 pm | Link

    I got tired of Lucy yanking the football away, and moved elsewhere.

    In response to North Portland's Revolver Bikes has closed its doors for good Array


  25. Comment by q February 20, 2020 @ 12:00 pm | Link

    Great article--brings up many of the problems caused by inadequate reporting, starting with poor, biased police reports.

    In response to Man riding a bicycle dies after collision with a truck driver in Goose Hollow Array


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