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  1. Comment by anusri February 19, 2017 @ 10:57 pm | Link

    Nice Article and Well written by you. And the article is too good and nice to read ald also everyone can easily understand. Thanks for Sharing!!!!!!

    Kanjivaram Silk Sarees

    In response to Two years in, bike bag business blooms for 'North St.' Array


  2. Comment by core:aggregator:record-not-finalized February 19, 2017 @ 7:30 pm | Link

    Import records must be finalized before posts can be inserted.

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  3. Comment by Aaron February 19, 2017 @ 7:05 pm | Link

    Michael: re: the connection of 57th and 58th, I'm looking to buy a house around there and would love to be able to get from 57th directly to Multnomah without having to ride back to Old Market Pub , but I don't see the paved road that you mention (walked the road today), it looks instead like the road goes straight into a garage:

    https://www.google.com/maps/@45.4667227,-122.7360357,3a,75y,269.45h,59.54t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sktwDVO27bDw47piT1G-axA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    Am I looking in the right spot?

    Thanks!

    AJ

    In response to Man dies after being struck while bicycling on SW Multnomah Array


  4. Comment by John Liu February 19, 2017 @ 6:37 pm | Link

    Good point, thanks.

    In response to PBOT will use little-known "emergency" law to rein in speeding drivers Array


  5. Comment by core:aggregator:record-not-finalized February 19, 2017 @ 5:45 pm | Link

    Import records must be finalized before posts can be inserted.

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  6. Comment by Mossby Pomegranate February 19, 2017 @ 5:07 pm | Link

    Sounds like Wheeler is already falling down on the job with the camps. To his credit, who has the answers?

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  7. Comment by soren February 19, 2017 @ 5:06 pm | Link

    "you simply can’t analyze financial issues if you’re not going to crunch numbers."

    so i guess points, lending fees, property taxes, maintenance, PMI (for most people), insurance, discretionary spending to furnish a home, and the fact that the average loan-owner moves in 7-9 years (well before they transition from paying down interest to accumulating equity occurs) are fake numbers. for many, purchasing a home is one of the dumbest financial decisions they will every make.

    In response to PBOT will use little-known "emergency" law to rein in speeding drivers Array


  8. Comment by Justin M February 19, 2017 @ 4:31 pm | Link

    No, it's true. I had a friend read it who agreed. Just an off-topic inquiry here, but by any chance do you think Adele deserved to win album of the year over Beyoncé?

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  9. Comment by Kyle Banerjee February 19, 2017 @ 4:09 pm | Link

    While everyone is worried all these petty distractions, there's no law against driving while juggling chain saws. Unbelievable...

    In response to Here are the Oregon Senate bills we're following this session (Part 1 of 2) Array


  10. Comment by Pete February 19, 2017 @ 4:01 pm | Link

    Ridiculous.

    In response to Here are the Oregon Senate bills we're following this session (Part 1 of 2) Array


  11. Comment by Justin M February 19, 2017 @ 3:58 pm | Link

    Pretty sure your quip at the end there verged on racism instead of the ¿joke? you intended it to be

    In response to Here are the Oregon Senate bills we're following this session (Part 1 of 2) Array


  12. Comment by John Miller February 19, 2017 @ 3:25 pm | Link

    Ted - I don't speak for Cycle Oregon nor am I a rider, but I know there have been several gravel options in the past. For example, 2 years ago going from Farewell Bend to Cambridge ID (or maybe from Baker City to Farewell Bend), there was a dirt road that paralleled a river.. (Others that year may have been disrupted by a fire in Halfway, Oregon.) Other years there have been Mountain road options. I also know CO knows folks want dirt road options and will try to program them when feasible (as long as there is a demand I assume). Generally, as you know, options are usually to make a longer ride. On layover day, there may be short, long and medium options (as they have on the Weekender.)

    In response to In Brief: Cycle Oregon 2017 is at Bend/Crater Lake Array


  13. Comment by Hello, Kitty February 19, 2017 @ 3:21 pm | Link

    OK, one tiny quibble with your numbers... the mortgage tax deduction only applies after you've satisfied the standard deduction; that is, the first $11K isn't really as tax free as it sounds because you'd get that anyway if you didn't itemize. At a marginal rate of 30%, that reduces your comparative benefit by about $3500.

    In response to PBOT will use little-known "emergency" law to rein in speeding drivers Array


  14. Comment by wsbob February 19, 2017 @ 2:37 pm | Link

    "multi lane roads enable speeding. Speeding is still the choice of the vehicle operator. Encourage implies intent on the part of the road authority that cannot be proven. multi lane roads move more traffic because they have more space. Higher speed is a consequence, but not an explicit intent of the road authority. Hence, multi lane roads enable speeding, but it cannot be proven they encourage speeding." paikiala

    Multiple lane roads do not encourage speeding, though as I've written in earlier comments, I think multiple lane roads may enable the small percentage of people driving that choose to excessively exceed speed limit...to do exactly that.

    If you're implying that road authorities, in any way, are 'encouraging' road users to exceed the speed limit on roads, I'd have to say, I think it's very unlikely that road users are doing this: not intentionally, or unintentionally. My understanding, is that it's the job of road authorities, be that city, state, county, and road dept personnel, to design, construct and maintain roads and streets for the safe and efficient travel of everyone that has need or occasion to use that travel infrastructure.

    That means the posted speed limits the road authorities and road personnel assign to various roads throughout their jurisdiction, are so assigned because it's those speeds, and not unofficial higher mph speeds that a small percent of individual road users decide to drive at...that can be relied upon for safe, efficient travel by everyone.

    The people driving excessively fast, that small percentage of all road users, are the road users that are gumming up the potential for smooth flow of traffic on the roads. It's they that are often responsible for the stop and go traffic. Everyone else using the road, basically has to put up with what they do, because the roads are open to everyone's use. That toleration costs society a lot of money and inconvenience. And injuries and death to people, too.

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  15. Comment by John Liu February 19, 2017 @ 2:11 pm | Link

    Hello, Kitty
    Even with “stacking” all we’re seeing is expensive studio apartments because, as you say, that’s where the profit is. At some point, people who are currently content with a studio are going to start having families, at which point the pressure on single-family housing is going to grow immensely. Given what those people are willing and able to pay for rent, I suspect there will be a growing demand for top-end houses, which make the housing affordability crisis even worse.
    Even if you believe that affordability could be solved through increased supply alone, it is not clear to me where all these new families will end up. Americans, for the most part, want to raise their families in houses (you know, with yards). It strikes me that all the housing we’re building today might just be setting us up for a different housing crisis in the future.
    What is affordable? I feel crazy for saying so, but perhaps, for a family, $350K? (That’s actually not affordable for many families). That number seems resonant because a house just sold for that near the one I wrote about above, bought by a developer, able to offer cash and waive the inspection.
    Recommended 0

    At current 30 year rate of a bit under 4%, a $400,000 mortgage requires a payment of less than $2,000 per month. Less the income tax deduction that's less than $1,500 after tax per month, or less than the rent on many two bedroom apartments. If you use the increasingly old fashioned rule of thumb that your mortgage payment should be no more than 35% of gross income, that implies about $50,000 annual income which is about the median household income in Portland. The rub is, of course, coming up with the down payment and credit history to qualify. For most people, that will require several years of diligent saving, or help from family, or ?

    This translates to a house in the $450,000-500,000 range, and smaller, mildly fixer-upper houses can still be bought for that in much of close in East Portland. Even in my neighborhood, where new McMansions are selling for $1.2 million, there are smaller, fixer-upper houses selling for $400,000 to $500,000. Often selling to developers ready to file demolition permits and build the next McMansion, but not always.

    Is that " affordable"? Not according to the conventional definition which refers to a family making 60% of median income. But probably yes to many families who no-one would consider rich or even affluent. Maybe we should call this sort of price level "approximately attainable".

    There's room to think outside the box as well. Live in not-so-close-in Portland, have a roommate, use basement or attic as an unpermitted rental, rent backyard to a tiny house dweller. A friend of mine is buying his house out by NE 87th from his (super cool) landlady for $270,000 and we figured that with a couple of the above maneuvers, he'll be able to just about live there for free.

    Sorry for using all these numbers, Adam. You simply can't analyze financial issues if you're not going to crunch numbers. Otherwise you're just hand-waving.

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  16. Comment by Pete February 19, 2017 @ 1:17 pm | Link

    Thanks for pointing out SB 454. As the gorge grows it's indeed necessary to fund improvements, and in addition to Bridge of the Gods, the Hood River bridge is nearing end of life and I suspect that's Chuck's true motivation here (see https://www.billtrack50.com/BillDetail/806874).

    From Hood River News, 2/6/2015: "Sen. Thomsen said he had planned to introduce a bill that would reduce the amount of emissions testing required for cars, which he said should be every ten years instead of four years."

    Some here may not agree with Chuck on that one, but Thomsen and Johnson are very sensible and proactive leaders in the gorge, and their support of this bill should take it a long way. I encourage others who don't reside in but use the gorge to reach out to your representatives and urge them to support this bill and to emphasize safety and access for pedestrians and bicyclists.

    More of Chuck's good work - inserting "bicycles" into this amendment on bridges:
    https://www.billtrack50.com/BillDetail/806776

    In response to Here are the Oregon Senate bills we're following this session (Part 1 of 2) Array


  17. Comment by q February 19, 2017 @ 1:10 pm | Link

    Yes, there are even large intersections where I've tried to find the street sign while driving through and never seen one, although that's not saying one may be there somewhere. They're also often covered up by trees on smaller streets. And there are lots of large intersections where by the time you can see the street sign, it's far to late to change lanes that you need to get into to make a turn.

    Street signs are on my mind because I live on a dead end off a major road, and have been noticing lots of cars entering the dead end and making illegal u-turns to get out. Just noticed there's no "dead end" sign until you're a block into the dead end. Poor signage creates danger and wasted time and fuel, and adds to driver distraction and anger.

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  18. Comment by rachel b February 19, 2017 @ 1:08 pm | Link

    Just saw your last comment to HK. It's that speed data to which you refer that I'm questioning, because of the observable slowing down of vehicles as they approach those cables. If the cables are used only for counting, let me know.

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  19. Comment by rachel b February 19, 2017 @ 1:06 pm | Link

    Clarification: I wasn't questioning the counts, paikiala, but the speeds, which were also posted on the link HK provided. I was assuming the cables played a role in recording traffic speed too...? Hence, my observation.

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  20. Comment by rachel b February 19, 2017 @ 1:02 pm | Link

    Hi wsbob--don't know where this comment is going to nest.... re: your helpful observation that "streets differ" (where traffic is concerned) made me smile. I do get off my street every now and then. Have for decades now, in fact. I have even driven in (gasp!) Beaverton. 🙂 🙂 I think I have a pretty comprehensive view of the traffic situation in greater Portland, from, you know, driving places, and the history to contextualize it. Our experience of it is simply flabbergastingly different. 🙂

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  21. Comment by Pete February 19, 2017 @ 12:27 pm | Link

    Polly likes to sit on me right shoulder, but doesn't affect my vision so much as my eye patch. Braking with me peg leg is as painful as scurvy tho.

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  22. Comment by Pete February 19, 2017 @ 12:17 pm | Link

    My car is older but has intuitive steering wheel buttons for phone, radio, and cruise control, as well as menu movement through a knob. The newer cars we've looked at seem to use soft buttons now, which make you stare at them - especially with 'older' eyes that's a distraction. I can also hold my phone button and the voice asks me which number to call, and uses trained words to either lookup or dial, citing the individual numbers back to me as they're understood. (Yes, I know that's a cognitive distraction, so I avoid initiating calls while driving anyway).

    Ironically in reviews of my car, common complaints were "too many buttons"...

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  23. Comment by Pete February 19, 2017 @ 12:06 pm | Link

    I can switch radio stations without taking my eyes off the road. Maybe you need a safer car? Or turn down the radio to hear Waze's voice guidance? I've never been distracted by nav guidance (which admittedly doesn't always choose the best route), but I have had too many close calls from drivers juggling smartphones, and a Mexican woman doing lunch deliveries that right-hooked me and then kept pointing to her phone's map saying "See? See?". "Si, I see that you don't know how to use a turn signal."

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  24. Comment by Kyle Banerjee February 19, 2017 @ 11:50 am | Link

    Which brings up another navigation devices do that is particularly useful in PDX. Street signs here are tiny and virtually invisible at night, particularly in inclement conditions.

    Even if you know the order of the streets and your full route by memory, figuring out where you are is can be tricky. If you want to talk about distractions, how about staring into darkness for signs with miserable legibility (when neighborhood yahoos haven't pulled them down to try to keep "outsiders" away) -- I sometimes have to stop my bike to figure out what street I'm crossing.

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  25. Comment by Pete February 19, 2017 @ 11:46 am | Link

    Top of my list is moms focusing on their kids in the back of the minivan while leaving school grounds after picking them up (I used to have a daily commute at that time). My wife's friends are just as distracted by dogs in the passenger seat as they are in the lap, so I too feel this is too focused on circumstance and not root cause and outcome.

    In response to Here are the Oregon Senate bills we're following this session (Part 1 of 2) Array


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