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  1. Comment by Eddy April 12, 2021 @ 9:50 pm | Link

    I hope the course goes around the MLB stadium.

    In response to Analysis: Cycling World Championship event would lead to $80 million in direct spending Array


  2. Comment by David Hampsten April 12, 2021 @ 9:27 pm | Link

    Most states have found work-arounds for the 85th percentile rules and 10 mph over, which as you say is nearly universal policy. My favorite is in West Virginia, one of three states in which the state DOT owns and maintains all county public roads. It's so far the only state that I'm aware of that rates highway curves to exactly the posted speed limit - if you go 10 mph over, you will drive off the road into trees or a cliff and likely die - which is a quick and effective way of using the roadway design to remove scofflaws from the gene pool. Clearly not Vision Zero.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  3. Comment by roger noehren April 12, 2021 @ 9:13 pm | Link

    That was a link to an earlier article. The more recent one shows how lower Hawthorne and Madison are being reconfigured with "floating" bus stops outboard of the bike lanes, which passengers will need to cross to access the buses or reach the sidewalk:
    https://bikeportland.org/2021/04/02/new-protected-bike-lanes-coming-to-key-stretch-of-hawthorne-blvd-329605

    In response to New Division Street bus stations raise questions about traffic laws and expectations Array


  4. Comment by David Hampsten April 12, 2021 @ 9:11 pm | Link

    I agree. Once a freeway gets built, the land that is along the freeway but away from an interchange loses much of its value, as it gets all the noise and air pollution but loses all access to the highway. Naturally such cheap land then becomes a target for low-value uses such as schools, subsidized housing, low-rent woody walkups, low-status businesses, and public parks - in other words, places where we allow the poor to live.

    On the other hand I agree with MOTRG that ODOT doesn't deserve the level of blame they are getting. The decision of running a highway through a poor Slavic neighborhood (afterwards a poor Black neighborhood) and the ensuing land use decisions were made chiefly by the City of Portland. The highway was located next to schools, parks, and low-density ethnic residential neighborhoods partly because the land was so cheap (at that time, 1940s and 50s), but also because the local opposition on the part of nimby land owners was so relatively weak compared to other parts of town.

    In response to Opposition to ODOT I-5 freeway project gains steam at Tubman School rally Array


  5. Comment by robw April 12, 2021 @ 8:42 pm | Link

    To Southwest, Barbur, downtown to Barbur World Foods, had separated bike and pedestrian facilities in the SW Corridor light rail plan which was voted down. Downtown to the Sellwood bridge on the West side is fairly bikeable. Terwilliger is far from level, but has decent bicycling. Capitol Highway between Multnomah Village and Barbur World Foods is going to have new bike and ped facilities.

    In response to North Portland is latest section of city to be put "in motion" Array


  6. Comment by Racer X April 12, 2021 @ 7:47 pm | Link

    Regarding "Eff you-Vs": perhaps the new punch line is "How many cyclists does it take to offset SUV drivers?" or

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  7. Comment by Ted Buehler April 12, 2021 @ 7:45 pm | Link

    The MUTCD dictates street signs and lane markings.

    The AASHTO Green Book (another federal-ish engineering been) dictates “design speed” of roads. Typically they are required to be safe for travel at 10 mph faster than the planned posted speed limit.

    State legislation in many states (Oregon and California included, I think) dictates that it is illegal to post a speed limit lower the the [?]th percentile speed of people on the road. Something like “is 50% of the people are going 35mph or faster, the road can’t be posted at less than 35 mph.”

    Which makes, of course, it difficult to design a road for XX speed limit, and not have pressure to raise the speed limit 10 mph after the road is built.

    Just a minor clarification, and a vexing conundrum that is the result of two different well-intended legislative bodies’ codes’ interaction with each other.

    Ted Buehler

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  8. Comment by Racer X April 12, 2021 @ 7:45 pm | Link

    Fred, and do not forget the "mom taxi" domestic rideshare daily tasks...in addition to your points...though the monster pick up trucks have recently taken over the SUV on the pantheon of excess vehicle per task / VRU safety impact

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  9. Comment by anonymous April 12, 2021 @ 7:21 pm | Link

    Well on my street they put a reduced speed sign behind a tree, and then a few hours later a police car was parked nearby. It seems the speed signs are not designed for safety by the city, but for money. If it was truly reduced for safety reasons, make it visible.
    BTW, I went out and cut limbs of the tree and made if visible, and waved hi to the officer.

    In response to PBOT releases new Vision Zero data dashboard Array


  10. Comment by eawriste April 12, 2021 @ 6:00 pm | Link

    The assumption here is that any area with poor air quality should not allow a school. The problem with that idea is that highways and interstates affect a wide swathe of areas including but not limited to the higher income Lincoln HS to the lower income Kelly and Oliver Lent schools in E Portland. Are all of these schools then choosing to put their kids in harms way? Is it reasonable to simply accept the affects of emissions when other cities have made this problem virtually nonexistent by not having freeways pass through the city?

    In response to Opposition to ODOT I-5 freeway project gains steam at Tubman School rally Array


  11. Comment by Anne Elizabeth Hawley April 12, 2021 @ 5:17 pm | Link

    Terrific video. I'm inspired by these young activists!

    In response to Opposition to ODOT I-5 freeway project gains steam at Tubman School rally Array


  12. Comment by eawriste April 12, 2021 @ 4:55 pm | Link

    As with the Kindermoord movement in the Netherlands in the 70s, the Sunrise movement, and kids protesting in general are really hard to ignore for a lot of people in political positions. So proud of the kids at Tubman and the No More Freeways coalition.

    In response to Opposition to ODOT I-5 freeway project gains steam at Tubman School rally Array


  13. Comment by Middle of the Road Guy April 12, 2021 @ 4:49 pm | Link

    "[Portland Public Schools] has been forced to spend $12 million [on a ventilation system] to reduce the health impacts of students and teachers,” said NCA’s Tori Heroux.

    It was Portland Public Schools who reopened Tubman knowing full well about the air quality issues. The protestors can point all the fingers they want at ODOT but PPS should not get off Scot-free.

    In response to Opposition to ODOT I-5 freeway project gains steam at Tubman School rally Array


  14. Comment by roger noehren April 12, 2021 @ 4:24 pm | Link

    This is the same set up as is being implemented on Hawthorne & Madison, except instead of just one bus line, there are three,so all cyclists will either have to stop for passengers disembarking and boarding (some of whom will be in wheelchairs) or ride around the buses in the through traffic lane.
    https://bikeportland.org/2021/02/09/a-closer-look-at-how-pbot-will-reconfigure-hawthorne-blvd-325875

    In response to New Division Street bus stations raise questions about traffic laws and expectations Array


  15. Comment by roger noehren April 12, 2021 @ 4:20 pm | Link

    This is the same set up as on Division, except instead of just one bus line, there are three,so all cyclists will either have to stop for passengers disembarking and boarding (some of whom will be in wheelchairs) or ride around the buses in the through traffic lane.
    https://bikeportland.org/2021/04/07/new-division-street-bus-stations-raise-questions-about-traffic-laws-and-expectations-329802

    In response to New protected bike lanes coming to key stretch of Hawthorne Blvd Array


  16. Comment by Owl April 12, 2021 @ 4:17 pm | Link

    I am empathetic to the concerns of Maywood Park residents and the people who park there to access Gateway Green from the north. It's safer and more scenic. But what I see as the big picture "take away" here is the 205 multipath is unpleasant and downright dangerous in most of it's stretch. If it was safer and more attractive (at least from the Gateway Transit Center to GG) the small neighborhood of Maywood Park would not have to bear the burden of being the primary parking lot for this amazing park. I think that if the the 205 multipath was safe, it would encourage more biking and less driving all over the city - with it's many access points- and serve as an outdoor recreational/alt transportation backbone for East Portland.

    In response to Self-governed City of Maywood Park at center of Gateway Green parking issue Array


  17. Comment by Jon April 12, 2021 @ 3:22 pm | Link

    I've been to professional cycling world championship events in person. This has as close to 0% chance of happening in Portland as can be calculated. We are too many time zones away from the primary live tv audience (the races would be ending at between 10pm and midnight in the Paris time zone), we are too far from large population centers to draw folks for a day trip, and there are not enough large corporate headquarters located in Oregon. If you don't have some big $$$ sponsor willing to kick in 10's of millions of dollars it is not going to happen. None of outdoor clothing/gear companies in Oregon are involved in cycling or if they are it is a tiny part of their company business. Best of luck to the folks making this attempt.

    In response to Analysis: Cycling World Championship event would lead to $80 million in direct spending Array


  18. Comment by Fred April 12, 2021 @ 2:41 pm | Link

    Thanks for linking to the excellent story about the MUTCD. Everyone should comment (by following the NATCO link).

    I love how the guy liked criticism of the MUTCD to "cancel culture," which is the new "Get out of jail free" card for the right wing.

    Also loved the comment about using the 85%-percentile speed to set speed limits: "It's like setting kids' bedtimes based on when 85% of them say they want to go to bed."

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  19. Comment by soren April 12, 2021 @ 2:39 pm | Link

    The MUTCD fight is probably the most important effort to reform SUV/truck-centric transportation policy in many decades.

    Is there a local group that is supporting this fight (e.g. a letter/comment campaign or direct action)?

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  20. Comment by maxD April 12, 2021 @ 2:28 pm | Link

    Lenny, thanks for all of your amazing work by you and the NP Greenway board. Did you guys consider a trail at the base of the bluff from Waud Bluff to under the Going Street Overpass? That is a beautiful natural bluff that would be very beautiful and totally non-stressful to walk of bike on, plus you could make connections up to the Dog Bowl and Adidas. The path would need to rise up to travel over the tunnel (which would be cool) and that would provide a nice view and Swan Island and the City/West Hills beyond. I love the path along the river, but connecting to it along surface streets will never be low stress, the intersections are truly scary on Swan Island!

    In response to North Portland is latest section of city to be put "in motion" Array


  21. Comment by soren April 12, 2021 @ 2:28 pm | Link

    "You get people who don’t drive these roads often (out of town, live in a different part of town, etc)."

    Even so, one would expect that locals would get fewer tickets but the rate of ticketing overall has not changed much and has even gone up in some locations. (It should be noted that Portland only started ticketing recently -- cameras issued warnings for over a year, as I recall.)

    Regardless, the idea of using speed cameras as a substitute for proven infrastructure is another example of "experimental" 'merkin exceptionalism. Why is our society and its government so resistant to evidence-based approaches?

    In response to PBOT releases new Vision Zero data dashboard Array


  22. Comment by Steve C April 12, 2021 @ 2:25 pm | Link

    Think of all the lost KOMs

    In response to Analysis: Cycling World Championship event would lead to $80 million in direct spending Array


  23. Comment by maxD April 12, 2021 @ 2:20 pm | Link

    I have long hoped that the NP Greenway wold go under the Steel Bridge on an elevated walk over the RR service road. It would connect to the landing on the east of the bridge over the RR tacks to the esplanade so people on bikes could either head west to the esplanade/downtown or east to the Blumenauer Bridge but avoid the cluster of MAX/bus and car lanes. I also second Earwriste's notion of closing that one section of Interstate to people driving. The southbound lane between the Signal at Tillamook and the signal at Larrabee would be for non-motorized travel, people driving would take the flyover.

    In response to North Portland is latest section of city to be put "in motion" Array


  24. Comment by Fred April 12, 2021 @ 2:19 pm | Link

    About SUVs: Ever look up from your handlebars to see who is driving SUVs? I see women driving them 70-80% of the time. Why? I venture to say that it's because women are more safety-conscious than men are, and they have made a *logical* decision to drive what they deem to be the heaviest and therefore safest vehicles (what was the title of that book about "the SUV arms race"?).

    If Vision Zero were an actual thing and people didn't have to worry so much about being killed and maimed on our streets, would women, in particular, buy fewer SUVs? Or should they just be legislated out of existence? (the SUVs, not the women).

    In response to The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more Array


  25. Comment by Fred April 12, 2021 @ 2:12 pm | Link

    "Two-lane roads encourage aggressive lane changing and speeding." Well said, ROH! This sentence should be tattooed onto the forehead of every ODOT and PBOT employee.

    The cardinal rule of cars is: If drivers CAN go faster, they WILL go faster.

    In response to PBOT releases new Vision Zero data dashboard Array


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