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  1. Comment by Slabtownie August 14, 2020 @ 3:55 pm | Link

    I hope they raise the gaurdrails a bit vs the current bridge, my fear of heights always kicks in on this bridge. I'd hate to crash over a guardrail and down, down, down.

    In response to New concept drawings show future bikeway on new Burnside Bridge Array


  2. Comment by PS August 14, 2020 @ 3:49 pm | Link

    Most new construction is not 4,000 SF in any close in neighborhood, the vast majority is already around 2,500 SF or just over. This will not materially change the landscape for developers, though they may just build the same size house on a split lot. This plan seems to think there is just a ton of people with $100k downpayment burning a hole in their pocket to buy a new 1600 SF quadplex for $500,000 and all the current housing inventory at that price point doesn't fit their needs even though it is in the same neighborhoods.

    People want to act like developers are idiots and driven solely by profit. Some might be idiots, but they also look at certainty of sale and therefore profits. The market might be shallower, but the certainty of selling a $750k single family home is FAR greater than selling a less expensive attached home. Just look around at days on market data for attached homes vs. single family and this story is written for you.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  3. Comment by X August 14, 2020 @ 2:47 pm | Link

    What's wrong with chalk? Most of our economy is composed of promises to pay, polite fictions, fancy wagers, pieces of paper and drifts of charged subatomic particles. Lots of what we call work actually produces nothing (my job for instance). Nevertheless, we eat.

    I think we can find ways to support each other while we figure out what's next.

    In response to 'Traffic gardens' bloom in Portland Array


  4. Comment by Hello, Kitty August 14, 2020 @ 2:26 pm | Link

    Sorry if I misunderstood. I was responding to "You might want to study up on this small and innovative company who are 75% POC themselves." I would expect a Taiwanese company to be majority Chinese. Referring to them POCs in that context would be using an American-centric viewpoint to analyze another culture. Perhaps that's not what you meant?

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Truck bloat, Rad story, Black voices, and more Array


  5. Comment by Johnny Bye Carter August 14, 2020 @ 2:09 pm | Link

    I saw them doing the one at Lent's Park and didn't realize it was part of a larger project.

    In response to 'Traffic gardens' bloom in Portland Array


  6. Comment by soren August 14, 2020 @ 1:24 pm | Link

    "you called me a liar for saying that sixplexes are allowed; now you seem to be walking that back by saying you just don’t think many will be built."

    It cracks me up that you think this is a contradiction. As I explained above, I believe that RIP will result in negligible housing production in twee inner PDX AND will target naturally affordable "buildable lots" (largely rental housing) in outlying areas. And it's not as if I'm the only person to come with these crazy ideas given that the city of Portland's own displacement analyses came to a similar conclusion:

  7. https://www.portland.gov/sites/default/files/2019-12/vol_3_appendix_b_displacement_risk_and_mitigation.pdf
  8. "As I explained,"

    RIP legalized flag lot subdivision for the construction of single-family homes (e.g. $700,000 "skinny" homes for the rich). The R1 lot I mentioned above was subdivided for the construction of this same type of housing. As someone who supports far higher levels of density than the typical "YIMBY", it's my experience that YIMBY's will show up in force to support $700,000 skinny housing and $550,000 ADUs but are largely disinterested in zoning reform that would fill their twee inner PDX neighborhoods with rent-controlled non-market housing.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  9. Comment by Hello, Kitty August 14, 2020 @ 1:20 pm | Link

    The question might be what do they have to teach us?

    One lesson might be that high-rise buildings filled with tiny apartments which few Americans would accept can be rented cheaply (or not... Hong Kong presents a compelling counter-example).

    Another might be that a declining population can impact prices.

    What are the lessons you would draw?

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  10. Comment by Hello, Kitty August 14, 2020 @ 1:09 pm | Link

    I too look forward to the days when teleportation is a reality! (Or we've built new cities designed in a fundamentally different way than any existing city... either would be great.)

    In response to 'Traffic gardens' bloom in Portland Array


  11. Comment by dan August 14, 2020 @ 12:59 pm | Link

    My comment was about cost per square foot, not your feelings about wet bathrooms or (heavens to Betsy!) sitting on tatami. There are apartments of comparable size to that Seattle pod in Tokyo for less than half the rent: https://tokyoapartment.com/en/rent/view/737307

    The point is that Japan may have something to teach us about policies that keep housing affordable...though the way they approach zoning sucks in my opinion.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  12. Comment by Middle of the Road Guy August 14, 2020 @ 12:32 pm | Link

    People will bring up the climate crisis when they think it will validate their views, and ignore it when convenient.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  13. Comment by dwk August 14, 2020 @ 12:16 pm | Link

    Classic comeback from the aggrieved conservative class when facts are pointed out....

    In response to Ask BikePortland: How can I connect with other riders in the time of COVID-19? Array


  14. Comment by Tony Rebensdorf August 14, 2020 @ 11:48 am | Link

    What I wouldn't give for one of these. Shaft drives are practically maintenance free. this is a true bike for the people. But they should go to those who NEED a bike. not me.

    In response to What should PBOT do with old Biketown bikes? Array


  15. Comment by Richard Herbin August 14, 2020 @ 11:12 am | Link

    "Let them eat chalk".
    For those who are already, and will soon be, lining up at food banks as a result of the controlled demolition of the economy..

    In response to 'Traffic gardens' bloom in Portland Array


  16. Comment by Bikeninja August 14, 2020 @ 11:08 am | Link

    My dream is that one day kids will visit museums with traffic gardens like this along with other interactive displays to learn about what life was like in the transportation dark, ages when people raced up and down the streets right in front of where people lived in giant multi-ton steel boxes spewing pollution and bits of rubber and brake dust. They will be aghast at how people of all ages were run down and killed on these streets by these primitive mechanical beasts. They will marvel at how people were only able to walk in moderate safety in little painted lanes and much of the land was too dangerous for children to play on. I imagine it to be much like us today visiting a museum with displays of medieval torture, or the Salem witch trials.

    In response to 'Traffic gardens' bloom in Portland Array


  17. Comment by Paul H August 14, 2020 @ 9:34 am | Link

    This is a bad tactic

    In response to Dan Ryan wins seat on Portland City Council Array


  18. Comment by BikeATX August 14, 2020 @ 8:46 am | Link

    Nope, I'm saying the video has people of various nationalities and ethnicities... what are you trying to say?

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Truck bloat, Rad story, Black voices, and more Array


  19. Comment by Hello, Kitty August 14, 2020 @ 1:28 am | Link

    It's not surprising that a 2BR would be bigger than a studio. In my friend's Tokyo studio, she had to fold up her bed to eat breakfast
    (sitting on the floor -- no room for chairs), and the shower was right over the toilet. Compared that that, these Seattle apartments are gargantuan (and are much nicer in terms of materials and finishes than most Tokyo apartments I've seen).

    That's mostly to say that the Japanese have a very different standard of living than we do (not necessarily better or worse, just different). The Tokyo strategy for keeping rents low would probably work less well in most American cities. A falling population probably also helps.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  20. Comment by dan August 14, 2020 @ 12:49 am | Link

    But Seattle micro-apartments start at $950 for 225 square feet: https://cubixapartments.com/floor-plans/. The Tokyo 2 bedroom is both bigger and cheaper.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  21. Comment by Matt S. August 13, 2020 @ 9:35 pm | Link

    $100 sq foot when the property is free. Not going to find a parcel of land west of 82nd for less than $300k. So your $230k home now goes for $530.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  22. Comment by qqq August 13, 2020 @ 9:27 pm | Link

    The connection between the building and the company was a lot stronger than just "bearing the moniker". The building was built and owned by Walter Chrysler, and built to be the company's headquarters, which it was for over two decades. It was totally "Look at me!" architecture--the world's tallest, extremely flamboyant building in a city with the world's largest collection of those. It even has auto-inspired detailing--giant cast aluminum hubcaps and radiator caps, for example.

    So anyone who wants to tie the Chrysler building to the Chrysler company (and its "environmental mayhem" or whatever) not only has a good case, they have a better case than would be true with almost any other building and company on earth.

    In response to Ross Island Sand & Gravel site up for sale, raising possibility of Springwater path connection Array


  23. Comment by Toby Keith August 13, 2020 @ 6:23 pm | Link

    It is interesting. Two months of looking the other way when we're supposedly "all in this together". But lobbing molotov cocktails at the police are an exemption apparently.

    In response to Ask BikePortland: How can I connect with other riders in the time of COVID-19? Array


  24. Comment by maccoinnich August 13, 2020 @ 6:20 pm | Link

    This morning you called me a liar for saying that sixplexes are allowed; now you seem to be walking that back by saying you just don't think many will be built.

    In any case, where we got started with this was the claim that "RIP specifically incentivizes" the kind of development that Renaissance Homes did at 28th & Belmont. As I explained, it doesn't. Under the regulations there's a range outcomes for a similar site, but none of them result in four ~2,200 sq ft houses.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  25. Comment by soren August 13, 2020 @ 6:18 pm | Link

    "making that a much less profitable endeavor "

    Smaller homes sell at higher price per square foot than larger homes so this is very dubious.

    RIP also enabled developers to subdivide lots (without review) in order to develop an additional detached single family home. If RIP were intended to encourage multi-family housing it would not have incentivized expensive detached housing (e.g. SFH and ADUs).

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  26. Comment by Hello, Kitty August 13, 2020 @ 5:49 pm | Link

    If you think that, you haven't been listening.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


  27. Comment by Stephen Keller August 13, 2020 @ 5:41 pm | Link

    2500 sf was a mc-mansion in all of human history bar the last 60 years or so. The problem with new development is that it is built according modern sensebilities of constant growth and improvement. None of which is typically affordable. What we need is a new and reduced sense of what is necessary.

    In response to Portland passes historic housing and parking reform policy Array


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