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Sneak peek at new carfree section of Historic Columbia River Highway

Posted by on July 24th, 2019 at 10:41 am

We cannot wait to ride this.
(Photos: ODOT)


In just 10 days, the Oregon Department of Transportation will tear the wrapping off a very impressive new section of the Historic Columbia River Highway. At 3.3 miles long, the $19 million project will leave us just five miles away from reconnecting this historic road that broke ground in 1916.

The new section begins just east of Cascade Locks and will provide walkers and rollers a carfree path around Shellrock Mountain. This has historically been the most unpleasant and dangerous gap in the entire Historic Highway where riders would have to pedal on a shoulder of Interstate 84 with people driving big trucks and RVs by at high speeds. The new path from Wyeth to Lindsey Creek will offer a much different experience.

A trail dedication event is scheduled for next Saturday August 3rd with a group bike ride led by Portland Bicycling Club leaving from Cascade Locks at 9:00 am. Unfortunately I’ll be out of town and can’t make it; but ODOT was kind enough to offer a few new photos for a sneak peek…

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Construction on the next piece of the puzzle — the Mitchell Point Crossing — is funded and set to begin next summer. After that, ODOT says there’s only 1.6 miles left to finally reconnect the entire 73-mile route between Troutdale and The Dalles. Learn more about the project here.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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VansGlowBoyCharles RossMiddle of The Road GuyJohnny Bye Carter Recent comment authors
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MTW
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MTW

” After that, ODOT says there’s only 1.6 miles left to finally reconnect the entire 73-mile route between Troutdale and The Dalles.”

This car-free segment seems pretty cool, but I followed the link to the ODOT site and it looks like most of that 73 miles is shared with autos. I’ve never ridden out that way, how is the experience when sharing the road with autos?

Shimran George
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Shimran George

In general, I found most of the shared areas to be relatively low traffic, the segments to and from Vista Point being the exception (both from Corbett and to Multnomah Falls). It would be nice if the entire stretch was bike path like this new section, but I will take what I can get! This new section looks amazing and love the detail work!

I am really looking forward to the Mitchell Point construction as it will provide a more dignified way of riding into Hood River. Currently the last 5 miles from Starvation Creek into Hood River are just riding the I-84 shoulder, a little anticlimactic for me, but better than nothing!

I also have heard from a commenter here the staircases will be eliminated in future iterations! It is not fun/slightly dangerous to go down stairs with a heavy touring bike. And the wheel wells are a nice feature, but don’t account for panniers!

Caleb
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Caleb

Is the new section rideable now or is it closed until the official opening? We were considering going out this Friday.

Tim
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Tim

Mitchell Point is going to be the “wow” section, but it will take some time to complete.

Johnny Bye Carter
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Johnny Bye Carter

That looks as unpleasant as the I-205 path: right next to a freeway with no sound barrier. Doesn’t look like they left a lot of room to plant trees to absorb the sound.

And that bridge is hilariously steep. They really couldn’t have spent a few more bucks on it to make it longer and decrease the grade?

I want to ride on it just to experience it. I don’t think I’ll want to ride on it twice.

Middle of The Road Guy
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Middle of The Road Guy

Bose Headphones and an e-bike.

Charles Ross
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Charles Ross

Have all sections closed as a result of the fire two years ago been reopened? I’ve pedaled out as far as Maryhill Museum and had the impression that much of the burn area along the Old Columbia River Highway is still no-go. Thanks for any info you can provide. C

GlowBoy
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GlowBoy

This new trail section is wonderful, and will open up a lot more great riding options in the Gorge. I’m absolutely excited to go out there and ride it first chance I get. But I’m still going to get to the gorge by car, or possibly by Gorge Express if the scheduling works out.

For me, as much as I enjoy riding *in* the gorge, biking out *to* the gorge through Corbett is a No Way, No How. I’ve heard of too many incidents on that part of the route.

Vans
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Vans

The whole trail is open, has been for quite some time.

No part of it is that hard to do, the constraints of this new section were nothing short of monumental, we are very lucky this got done, no way this is bad in any way. Challenging in some parts, probably, worth the effort, absolutely.

Many of us take the Gorge for granted, nobody will have something this epic but us when its done.

None of the share the road sections are untenable with normal where with all, proper vigilance and patience as should be at all times anyway.

That being said it can be “fun” when its backed up bumper to bumper near the falls, then its just like city riding at rush hour with tourists instead.

I’ve never had a problem no matter where, when or what direction I’m going.

I love the whole thing, period.