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Street art celebrating ‘Black Williams’ to be unveiled Saturday

Posted by on May 30th, 2017 at 12:31 pm

Two of the signs that will be erected as part of the project.
(Project art samples: City of Portland)

Hank’s Dairy, Les Femmes, House of Sound, Fred Hampton’s Health Clinic — these are all important parts of the history of North Williams Avenue that have been all but erased today.

The ‘Black Williams Project‘ — which will be unveiled this Saturday June 3rd — aims to re-insert these places and the people who made them, back into our consciousness.

The project is one of the many tangible outcomes of the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s North Williams Traffic Safety Project. This project began in January 2011 as an attempt to improve the busy bikeway on Williams Avenue; but after concerns of racism from some people in the community and a lack of black voices involved in the planning process, it morphed into a citywide debate about the role bicycles play in gentrification and systemic discrimination. 18 months later a PBOT stakeholder committee decided on a major redesign of the street. In addition, stakeholders felt that users of the street should have a permanent reminder about the vibrant black culture that existed there long before the new high-rise apartments, breweries, and thousands of daily bicycle commuters.

PBOT committed $100,000 of the project’s $1.5 million budget to the Black Williams Project in July 2013. As we reported last year, the project will include interpretations of the neighborhood’s cultural past through a series of sidewalk tiles, signs, sculptures and kiosks created by local artists Cleo Davis and Kayon Talton Davis. There are 40 art pieces in total.

Now the work is ready and PBOT is hosting a “community celebration” for its unveiling. Here’s a snip from the invitation:

Williams Ave. was once the vibrant heart of Portland’s Black community. Formerly known as the “Black Broadway,” the corridor included a concentration of Black churches, businesses, social service organizations and nightclubs that were thriving and active community institutions.

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This series of tiles related to the Black Panther Party will be embedded into the sidewalk.

Although the landscape has changed, there is much to remember, celebrate and build upon. In 2012, the Williams Ave. Safety Project Stakeholder Advisory Committee recommended to the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) that these stories be honored through an art history project that would have a prominent place on the corridor. Thus, the community-led Honoring History of Williams Ave. Committee and the Historic Black Williams Project were born.

Since then, local artists Cleo Davis and Kayin Talton Davis have been collecting stories, memories and histories from Black community members… We hope that this project will serve as both a visual archive and an inspiration for future community efforts.

At Saturday’s event you can expect to hear from the artists and neighborhood leaders and there will be group and self-guided walks.

For more on the art, the artists, and the important context around this project, read this story from The Skanner.

Saturday’s event begins at 12:00 pm at Dawson Park. Check out the event listing for more details.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

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NOTE: We love your comments and work hard to ensure they are productive, considerate, and welcoming of all perspectives. Disagreements are encouraged, but only if done with tact and respect. If you see a mean or inappropriate comment, please contact us and we'll take a look at it right away. Also, if you comment frequently, please consider holding your thoughts so that others can step forward. Thank you — Jonathan

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daisyMonkeyseeHello, KittyJonathan GordonAlan 1.0 Recent comment authors
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Racer X
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Racer X

Another interesting visual tool for education would be to add a “red line” in thermo across roadways* (or sidewalks or ringing utility poles, etc.) as to where banking and federal/city housing policies limited african american property ownership / bank loans post war. [And a corresponding Google Map layer to pull up while walking about.]

*Not related to traffic control.

Hebo
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Hebo

“Although the landscape has changed” is pretty impressive use of the passive voice.

OnTheRoad
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OnTheRoad

And this story is about bicycling exactly how?

mran1984
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What he wrote…

Jonathan Gordon
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Jonathan Gordon

If you’re curious to learn more about why this is relevant to bicycling in Portland, I encourage you to look through the back history on BikePortland, which has seven pages worth of summaries alone:

https://bikeportland.org/tag/williams-avenue-bikeway-project/

This project gained national media attention and has (hopefully) shaped how PBOT approaches all bike projects in the future. It really opened my eyes to how the issues of racial discrimination and cycling infrastructure are far from orthogonal.

Thanks again Jonathan for your reporting on this project. It’s been a fascinating learning experience.

Alan 1.0
Subscriber

Amen to both Jonathans, and also see yesterday’s Monday Roundup (emphasis mine):

“While we move on with covering bicycling and related news, my thoughts remain heavy with the many issues surrounding the hate-fueled attacks on innocent people that happened Friday on a light rail train in northeast Portland. I’m not sure what form the incident and its aftermath will take here on BikePortland, but it will have an impact — both on the stories we cover and how we cover them, as well as the content and tone of the daily discussions we have in the comments.” –Jonathan Maus

Monkeysee
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Monkeysee

… crickets.

Velograph
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Velograph

I’m looking forward to seeing this on Williams!

MaxD
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MaxD

I am really glad you wrote this story! I may not have heard about it otherwise, and now I am looking forward to taking my family to the opening. Bikes are a visible symbol of gentrification and riding through a place does subtly change it. Building significant bike infrastructure changes it more. Neglecting to install any safety improvements for decades also changes a place. Condemning and destroying cultural centers to install a freeway completely alters a place. People riding bikes have a relatively small effect, but it is cumulative. PBOT has played a large role and ODOT a larger role still in changing this place. The histoy of North Portland is an important and partly tragic part of Portland’s history and it is critically important to on-going race relations that this history is told (and told honestly, not like the glossed over Civil War memorials in New Orleans). I applaud BikePortland for drawing attention to this and acknowledging the role that people riding bikes has played in changing this place and how Portland and Oregon’s transportation planning can have dire consequences with clear winners and losers. This is one of the most promising pieces of interpretation/art I have seen in long time and I am very excited to experience it.

Hello, Kitty
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Hello, Kitty

My hope is that everyone can ride bikes on the same streets, and that a low cost, healthy, and sustainable form of transport will not take on an undeserved symbolic meaning.

Monkeysee
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Monkeysee

Hear hear.

Monkeysee
Guest
Monkeysee

In fact, I think this comment wins, Kitty! Tell them to just shut it down.

Monkeysee
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Monkeysee

Hear, hear.
Kitty’s comment is reasonable, and so is my response.

daisy
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daisy

Thanks so much for posting this news!

I also want to encourage folks to support the talented artists behind this project, Cleo and Kayin, by patronizing their businesses Soapbox Theory and Screw Loose Studio, one of the few black-owned businesses still on North Williams:
http://shop.soapboxtheory.com/
http://screwloosestudio.com/

Soapbox Theory has cards, prints, t-shirts, and more, and Screw Loose Studio does custom screenprinting and graphic design.

They’re on N Williams across from Hopworks Bike Bar.