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  1. Comment by Mike September 25, 2018 @ 7:57 pm | Link

    Paikiala has perhaps not traveled much, but when in Amsterdam traffic was restricted on many streets, neighborhood streets. "Legal" means there is a law. Laws get changed. By bold leaders.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  2. Comment by BradWagon September 25, 2018 @ 7:56 pm | Link

    If I'm just trying to efficiently get into town then yes, go Multhnomah > Barber. Coming from Beaverton I usually go Vista or Zoo or even Cornell to get into west side of town.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  3. Comment by rick September 25, 2018 @ 7:55 pm | Link

    What is a north / south project that the city / county should build next? I'm asking about one that isn't on the table yet.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  4. Comment by rick September 25, 2018 @ 7:52 pm | Link

    but do you prefer riding towards Burlingame and downtown on Barbur versus riding away from the city center ?

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  5. Comment by rick September 25, 2018 @ 7:48 pm | Link

    I think commuter rates could rise. There are two very important road reorganizations set to take place next year between east Beaverton and SW Portland. Lake Oswego will also start on the expensive Boones Ferry Road project in Lake Grove.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  6. Comment by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) September 25, 2018 @ 7:25 pm | Link

    Emerson,

    I’m not seeing that comment. Happy to post it.

    In response to Comment of the Week: E-assist boosterism will be Biketown's demise Array


  7. Comment by resopmok September 25, 2018 @ 7:05 pm | Link

    It's not clear to me whether we are talking about visitor bike parking (outside the building, like staples on the sidewalk) or some sort of resident parking. Given the sorts of new development I see, which include commercial on the lower level with residences above, I think both are in order, and should be required. After all, if we are no longer mandating that new buildings necessarily include car parking, the money saved on this is still quite substantial compared to the cost of building bike parking. Providing adequate parking everywhere is certainly a prerequisite for increasing mode share.

    In response to Wonk Night zeroes in on bike parking code update Array


  8. Comment by sikoler September 25, 2018 @ 6:50 pm | Link

    Part of my comment was deleted. My bad. I'm not sure what I said that was an insult, can someone help me out as to what triggers this?

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Fast women, Vision Zero progress, Trump's tariffs, and more Array


  9. Comment by Michael Andersen (Contributor) September 25, 2018 @ 6:48 pm | Link

    Here are the one-year estimates for Davis from 2012-2017, in order:
    19%
    25%
    23%
    19%
    17%
    16%

    So not just a one-year glitch, anyway. But it's a small town so super variable, and you certainly know Davis better than I do!

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  10. Comment by John Liu September 25, 2018 @ 5:58 pm | Link

    The difficulty with a mandate for existing buildings is that in some cases good bike parking can reasonably be installed, and in other cases it isn't feasible (maybe there simply isn't a place for it) or the cost would be prohibitive. The city would probably need some way to figure out which category each building is in.

    In response to Wonk Night zeroes in on bike parking code update Array


  11. Comment by Bikeninja September 25, 2018 @ 5:15 pm | Link

    You forgot Brexit, The subprime auto loan bubble, the giant teetering student loan mountain, and the coming crash of the highly leveraged and overvalued stock market..

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Fast women, Vision Zero progress, Trump's tariffs, and more Array


  12. Comment by Dan A September 25, 2018 @ 5:15 pm | Link

    It's extremely difficult to close roads to cars, even temporarily. We have a 1/4 mile section of road in my neighborhood that is covered with hundreds of kids crossing back & forth during Halloween. I'm not kidding, this particular section of the neighborhood is SWARMING, so much so that it has drawn a lot of traffic from outside of our neighborhood. It has all of the hyper-decorated houses and the best candy. But, rather than park a few blocks away and walk to this area, most people choose to drive right down the center of it to look for parking in the middle of the crowd, and some parents even drive alongside their kids as they walk from house to house! It's insanity.

    We've been trying to get permission to shut down this 1/4 mile segment of road in our neighborhood for 3 hours during Halloween before some kid in a costume gets killed. The County has a block party permit system in place, but is denying a permit in this instance because their arbitrary guidelines only allow block parties during daylight hours, which is "about safety of block party participants, as well as drivers", per the coordinator. Um, right, somehow closing this street down with a couple of barricades and a police car is going to make this road more dangerous to the crowds people on foot and to the people in cars who won't be able to plow through those crowds. As a bureaucrat you have to be very careful to keep common sense from interfering with your red tape.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  13. Comment by Bikeninja September 25, 2018 @ 4:57 pm | Link

    You are correct in many ways, cats are alert, have quick reflexes and don’t use smart phones perhaps they would be better drivers than some humans

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Fast women, Vision Zero progress, Trump's tariffs, and more Array


  14. Comment by Hello, Kitty September 25, 2018 @ 4:57 pm | Link

    You assert that zoning is currently designed to exclude people on the basis of race. To which I say "bullshit".

    In response to Planning Commission finds 'missing middle,' votes for more housing citywide Array


  15. Comment by John Lascurettes September 25, 2018 @ 4:38 pm | Link

    Under federal consumer safety law, the ELF is deemed a bicycle, and it complies with applicable federal safety regulations. We do not claim to comply with local, regional, and state usage regulations because every state and municipality can require anything they wish in regards to vehicles using their public roads.
    Generally-speaking, the ELF is legal to ride wherever a traditional bicycle is legal, but this may not be absolutely true in a particular jurisdiction. Electric bicycles are a very new thing and the laws are constantly changing as new products emerge.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Fast women, Vision Zero progress, Trump's tariffs, and more Array


  16. Comment by emerson September 25, 2018 @ 4:35 pm | Link

    Hey Jonathan - As you saw I put together a polite, but pointed, critique of the ideas surrounding the topic of this post. Why not post the comment? What gives?

    In response to Comment of the Week: E-assist boosterism will be Biketown's demise Array


  17. Comment by John Lascurettes September 25, 2018 @ 4:34 pm | Link

    Where and how would you park that? If you went to the movies or shopping, would you park it in an auto spot? Would that invoke the rage of a carhead to abuse it?

    I love it for its all-year practicality. And it would certainly give you a really great travel range — provided you don't have any motor-vehicle only barriers.

    In response to The Monday Roundup: Fast women, Vision Zero progress, Trump's tariffs, and more Array


  18. Comment by soren September 25, 2018 @ 4:33 pm | Link

    Because people of color have disproportionately lower-income, exclusionary zoning was
    and is designed to have “much of the same results as explicit racial zoning”.

    In response to Planning Commission finds 'missing middle,' votes for more housing citywide Array


  19. Comment by soren September 25, 2018 @ 4:32 pm | Link

    Because people of color have disproportionately lower-income, exclusionary zoning was designed to have "much of the same results as explicit racial zoning".

    In response to Planning Commission finds 'missing middle,' votes for more housing citywide Array


  20. Comment by Matt September 25, 2018 @ 4:24 pm | Link

    It doesn't help that a significant portion of the bike town bikes are unusable because of the keypads. Even when they do work, it is a frustrating game of push push push and then hitting back back back when it finally registers. Glad to hear they are fixing this and I hope it doesn't go away because it is so much more usable now that they have gotten rid of the hub system.

    In response to Comment of the Week: E-assist boosterism will be Biketown's demise Array


  21. Comment by paikiala September 25, 2018 @ 4:19 pm | Link

    Because, you know, signs solve everything...
    'Local traffic only' is not a legal everyday thing, and certainly not enforceable on public streets. It's a warning for construction.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  22. Comment by J_R September 25, 2018 @ 4:12 pm | Link

    Today's Oregonian features a story about deer hunter killing a friend with a bow and arrow in a hunting accident and how he's going to prison for a year. I wonder why the famous motorist explanation "but it was just an accident" didn't work for him.

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  23. Comment by Mike Owens September 25, 2018 @ 4:03 pm | Link

    I have so many thoughts, hopefully I can make this short and clear.

    I had hoped that EVs would move us away from fossil fuels. But my calculations and news about how much the climate is heating faster than previously thought have changed my mind. There isn't time for EVs to replace ICE. (Yes, cars also have many other issues when used for transportation). Instead, my only hope is that cities like Portland can do something bold, along with the e-transportation revolutions of e-bikes and e-scooters.

    The summer experiments and use of low-traffic steets for greenways has been important as a proof of concept, and to ease folks into the idea of cars being restricted.

    Now it is TIME TO CLOSE STREETS TO CARS. There are too many examples in other cities showing how the move increases the desirability, economy and livability along such areas.

    1. Greenways need many more diverters and "local traffic only signs". Keep cars out unless someone lives there.
    2. Make the Sunday Parkways happen without cones/volunteers every day. Critical mass and 1. above are needed to solidify these routes as safest of all for kids. The greenways are already park to park. Allow some food/coffee trucks at the parks. Greenways are how neighborhoods get to the central loop. Neighborhoods get lots of say on what works best for their greenway.
    3. Connect the 40-mi loop with protected bike lanes. The PBOT 18 project bundles are not enough. It would take bold leadership, but remove parking along the most desired routes to make protected lanes for bike and scooter travel along this central asset. Double or triple the current budget with a carbon tax. Win-win.
    4. Build car drop-off/pickup spots at key access areas to car free shopping/entertainment streets that are also along the 40 mi loop. Encourage ride-sharing to downtown to these spots. Give tax incentives to builders to change surface lots into parking garages at key locations.
    5. Put the squeeze on the large employers to cut down on the thousands of Intel/Nike/Etc. folk driving solo out to these areas. Tie their tax benefits to % of employees using other methods. Their workforce is a major reason for the costs we all incur from gridlock on roads.

    We have studied enough. There is no impediment to the above except the will to do it. (which is a huge obstacle, but can be overcome with vision and bold leaders. )

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  24. Comment by BrianC September 25, 2018 @ 3:52 pm | Link

    I kind of like open floor plans. (I'm paid by the hour though, so the less productive the client environment is, the more gross revenue for my contracting company...)

    In response to Bike commute numbers ebb nationwide; in Portland, they're flat Array


  25. Comment by Carrie September 25, 2018 @ 3:51 pm | Link

    Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor)
    My advice was to use the new code (once it’s passed, with all the good stuff hopefully still in it) as an advocacy tool. Even if a building owner isn’t legally obligated to abide by it, you can still use it as leverage by emailing applicable sections of it and pointing out that the building is way outdated and “Here’s the new code just passed by City Council that shows what bike parking is supposed to be like,” etc etc..

    That's reasonable advice Jonathan, but my limited experience of doing exactly what you recommended, being told that level of parking wasn't needed (!), and then having a joke of bike 'parking' installed despite a cadre of people with cycling experience IN THE BUILDING and, when we've tried to negotiate on the topic 2 years later being told 'but we installed bike parking', is that sometimes we really need the regulatory stick. (The installed parking are hooks screwed into vertical wooden pillars with nothing to lock your bike to. And requires lifting your bike overhead to hang from hook.) And it's unfortunate we don't have a regulatory stick for old buildings. We can advocate and suggest all we want, but in a car-centric culture and reward system, sometimes sticks can be very helpful. Look at City Hall, for a very public example.

    And for those who say 'just move', you know it's not that simple. Especially in a city with rising rents and little leverage for the renter. And an employee of a business has even less options. Again, I know the City is trying to remove stupid low-hanging barriers to cycling and updating the code is so very welcome in that regard. But there are many buildings and resulting businesses that will still have these barriers.

    In response to Wonk Night zeroes in on bike parking code update Array


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