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  1. Comment by matchupancakes June 22, 2018 @ 11:35 pm | Link

    Here are two articles compiled after extensive outreach to the Woodstock and Brentwood-Darlington neighborhoods of Portland. Additional details and community requests can be found within.

    Woodstock Unimproved Roads: https://9e4c15fd-a-62cb3a1a-s-sites.googlegroups.com/site/larkeplanning/al-s-experiment/RNI_Toolkit.pdf?attachauth=ANoY7cqZFoRCKuLT8MWyJhMlRGIlKAv77wqf00S6CUC9FXZTOWc9dPsZN8aHcrb8tbnkJud35_PVSP7yf4QYZZNw9C9lMUE7m6jhCPlyPnFf_C5S-ailhKU9bm17XscmsO081UyywMGNrdBPeYpcWRAKMbyJXg1gvBNBASXep_0f8bOS5rTbTgXkkBfxBJ9UpdPKmXOYKarTYZ4WlPSiIWE_YRYDi-tmi_6zhvCE87J8xqI3135r3Ow%3D&attredirects=0

    Brentwood-Darlington: Assessment and Action Plan: ftp://ftp02.portlandoregon.gov/BPS/district_planning/BDAssessmentActionPlan_Combined_optimized.pdf

    In response to Guest Post: It's time to make southeast Portland's infrastructure gaps "SEAMless" Array


  2. Comment by Swan Island Runner June 22, 2018 @ 11:34 pm | Link

    I love this path. There is also a STEEP hill about 100 yds long in the middle of the path that I love to hate. 🙂

    In response to How to find the Highway 26 bike path from the Sunset Transit Center Array


  3. Comment by Steve June 22, 2018 @ 11:33 pm | Link

    Yeah, what happened with that? I was on an official PBOT ride a few years ago and we paused where Whitaker ends with some steps leading up to Pacific Hwy. The PBOT ride leader indicated there would soon be a flashing beacon crossing there to continue up Whitaker on the West side of Pacific Hwy.

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  4. Comment by Swan Island Runner June 22, 2018 @ 11:21 pm | Link

    The Jefferson repave is fine as long as you just commit to taking the lane before the curve -- they did a huge disservice by actually marking the shoulder as bike lane, where before it was ambiguous. It's not even close to safe with those drainage dips, the first one comes before the curve is complete and a first time rider could easily find themselves making an emergency swerve or losing control into the car lane. Heed Jered's advice -- if you come into Goose Hollow on Jefferson from 26, take the lane!

    In response to How to find the Highway 26 bike path from the Sunset Transit Center Array


  5. Comment by Kyle Banerjee June 22, 2018 @ 10:15 pm | Link

    As someone who's been riding this section every workday for years, I'd say most of the things people seem worried about are not the real problems. Compared to other stuff you have to deal with, the bike lane on Terwilleger is the easy part even with blackberries and a few rocks scattered in the lane.

    Of the concerns brought up, the thing I'd expect people would like the least is that when traffic is heavy but still moving along Sam Jackson, less confident riders might find difficulty pushing their way across the lane in much faster but tightly spaced traffic so they can transition from Sam Jackson to Terwilleger.

    People keep saying Terwilleger is steep but it's not even close to the steepest thing you'll hit. Campus Drive over Terwilleger is much steeper as are Condor and Hamilton. Going down, there is no bike lane whatsoever on Campus Drive and the traffic really gets backed up. Going down Sam Jackson, there is also no bike lane and traffic gets backed up there too. There is no route going down where you won't have to get close to traffic.

    When you get to the top, OHSU bike facilities suck despite the fact they want them to be good. There are very few places to lock up and the bike room I'm allowed to use is pretty hopeless. The only reason things work as well as they do is that few people take their bikes up, and hardly any of them actually pedal up.

    Most people who can pedal up without being a mess is going to be fine with the traffic. Most people who'd have difficulty with the traffic would also have trouble with the hill. I have never had a negative interaction with any kind of vehicle on the hill -- the traffic here is easier than what you'll have to deal with once you get to Barbur or Sheridan.

    Walking is an underrated way to get around. Relatively efficient, scenic, and low stress. I would recommend anyone with concerns to give that a shot.

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  6. Comment by Eric Porter June 22, 2018 @ 9:53 pm | Link

    EricIvy
    Keep up the awesome work Eric! -EricRecommended 0

    Yeah! Cool pics, & what that Eric said ^^

    -Eric

    In response to Pedalpalooza through the lens of photographer Eric Thornburg Array


  7. Comment by El Biciclero June 22, 2018 @ 9:20 pm | Link

    They've re-paved Jefferson from about the bridge down to the circle, and re-allocated the right lane so it is now right-only onto 20th for cars, and beyond that it's bus/bike only. They striped the bike lane all the way to 20th, and trimmed the brush that used to encroach on the shoulder of the curve. It's still a little sketchy in that curve (although it feels much wider than it used to), and the drain grates and other access holes in the street make the newly-striped bike lane a bit of an obstacle course, but other than that it's a fairly nice re-pave.

    In response to How to find the Highway 26 bike path from the Sunset Transit Center Array


  8. Comment by Todd Boulanger June 22, 2018 @ 6:22 pm | Link

    The Biketown $20 credit works! Thanks TRAM!!

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  9. Comment by Todd Boulanger June 22, 2018 @ 6:06 pm | Link

    Bravo to OHSU for installing special pavement markings with arrows [aka way finding for bicyclists). But has PBoT done any emergency climbing bike lanes or downhill [orange] sharrows?

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  10. Comment by Emily Johnson June 22, 2018 @ 5:29 pm | Link

    Seriously, don't be a jerk if you use the sidepath! Back when I lived over there and walked my dog, most cyclists were fine, but I dealt with close calls a few times per month. If you're going uphill, gravity will usually keep you in check. Just be aware that there are a ton of elderly residents from Terwilliger Plaza who are out and about on the sidepath, particularly between OHSU and Duniway Park. I watched a cyclist take out an old lady back in November and it was upsetting to say the least.

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  11. Comment by Racer X June 22, 2018 @ 5:13 pm | Link

    Yeah, I saw the email too...I guess serving customers with bikes is just an afterthought since they ditched the smart cars. (Car2Go was much more cutting edge and progressive back then I guess.) And the rear rack on the old smart cars was much more accessible for ALL users vs. the roof mounted racks.

    In response to Car2go and ReachNow announce bike racks on Portland fleet vehicles Array


  12. Comment by soren June 22, 2018 @ 4:19 pm | Link

    If the "car free" person did not previously use a car then there is increased use of fossil fuels. Moreover, car share is convenient so it's my guess that some "car-free" have increased their driving. (Multiple studies of uber and lyft, which serve a similar function, show that these services have decreased reliance on mass transit and increased reliance on automobility.)

    In response to Car2go and ReachNow announce bike racks on Portland fleet vehicles Array


  13. Comment by jered June 22, 2018 @ 4:08 pm | Link

    I always rode the path to the zoo and then the shoulder on 26 from the zoo exit down into Goose Hollow. When traffic is moving it feels super safe and easy. In stopped traffic I would slow down as I approached the exit to avoid awkward interactions with cars moving into the shoulder to get to the exit (to be fair a bike moving at 30+mph in the shoulder is not expected...) on the Goose Hollow exit, after you pop out from under 26 I always take the lane as I approach the corner into Goose Hollow. There are some shrubs that block the shoulder and there are a couple rough patches and dips + cars are usually going really fast and tend to fade towards you if you don't take the lane, take it early and stay centered in the lane all the way to the traffic circle! Doing this cut a minimum of 15 minutes off my commute home from Beaverton.

    In response to How to find the Highway 26 bike path from the Sunset Transit Center Array


  14. Comment by q June 22, 2018 @ 4:08 pm | Link

    And I don't think the irony is lost on people here that, when I describe a bad experience I had with PBOT, you respond with the same type of attitude that in large part created the problem I was describing.

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  15. Comment by q June 22, 2018 @ 3:56 pm | Link

    No, you're wrong. I did not presume anything. YOU presumed that I presumed. I said we were promised over 200' of paving and ended up with 40'. I did not presume why it was stopped. I asked the project manager, who forwarded my email to someone else at PBOT, who did not answer why it the scope was changed, but confirmed there will be no more paving.

    If something was "discovered after work began" he did not tell me.

    The project was "designed". It has been planned for over a year. It was not "ad hoc".

    Yes, it is a street without curbs, but why on earth do you then accuse me of "lump(ing) all of PBOT together"? I never said anything about my example being true of all of PBOT. The onsite crew on this project was excellent. I have praised PBOT in other comments, regularly.

    The street is SW Miles St. east of Macadam.

    The berms extend several feet into the travel lanes. The paving is not even two lanes wide for much of the road, and there are no sidewalks, so the berms are in the path of people walking and biking. There are no marked bike lanes. There are some ancient "sharrow" markings. The street is designated as a pedestrian route and bike route that connects SW to the Willamette Greenway Trail. It is well used by people walking and biking.

    In regard to the sand, there was no seal coat applied to the existing road. I assume the sand was placed on the new asphalt to reduce its tackiness. I did not question the use of the sand. I pointed out it makes the new berms--which being new will surprise people using the street--almost invisible because the sand is exactly the same color as the existing paving on which the berms were built. At least cones were placed on the berms the first day, but those were removed, leaving the new berms and the thick, loose sand spread all over.

    I also reported the berms to PBOT through the general phone line, asking to talk to someone who deals with biking and pedestrian issues, and was directed to a message box. I haven't heard back yet, but that was only yesterday. The manager who responded incompletely to my first email has never answered most of my questions in that email, and hasn't responded at all to my subsequent ones.

    Do you have a phone or email contact I should use to contact someone at PBOT who deals with bike and pedestrian issues?

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  16. Comment by Eric Leifsdad June 22, 2018 @ 3:38 pm | Link

    Coming down Terwilliger, you should ride in the bike lane if you're going fast but beware the lost bike lane at the bottom as it meets Sam Jackson and tight spots where it curves around to become 6th. I can't imagine trying to thread through the left from Sheridan to 4th across two lanes at a standstill headed for Ross Island bridge and one speeding through to Barbur. It might be nicer to peel off into the crosswalk to Lincoln where the bike lane peters-out on 6th. If you're in a hurry and feeling vehicular, maybe follow 26 to Hood Ave, Kelly and the Gibbs bridge.

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  17. Comment by Eric Leifsdad June 22, 2018 @ 3:27 pm | Link

    The route between Lincoln and Terwilliger / the turn at Sam Jackson is sketchy in both directions. Note the differences from google's directions at Harbor Dr. + Water Ave vs the viaduct -- worth exploring if you want to ride left-side sidewalk up Harrison rather than use the crosswalk at the top (Naito bikeway is also left-side there.) Also, via the sidewalk bikeway to the bike signal crossing at 5th off the end of Lincoln. If you're going to pull off to the left of 5th and not ride in the bus lane through that signal, don't go around the block at 4th and Lincoln.

    In any case, how many people want to merge across Sam Jackson traffic into a left-turn pocket to wait for a green arrow and then suck on car exhaust while climbing the steepest part of the hill on the right-hand bike lane overgrown with thorny blackberry canes? There is a curb-cut on 5th that will take you across Broadway to the sidewalk on the left side of 6th/Terwilliger. One could also ride out Broadway/6th/Terwilliger bike lane and cross left to the park sidepath. You need to be super careful at intersections when riding on the left-side sidewalk, but the most dangerous thing riding slowly up the hill on the left are the dirty looks from people walking their dogs (don't be a jerk.)

    PBOT + Portland Parks could do everyone a favor and make a car-free Condor for a month.

    In response to Five-week Aerial Tram closure starts tomorrow: Here's what you need to know Array


  18. Comment by q June 22, 2018 @ 3:22 pm | Link

    Probably why he wrote, "ideally".

    Plus, landscaped medians help manage stormwater, and can include trees (providing shade and cooling, improving appearance). Including landscaping on a bike lane project might increase support for it...

    I'm sure they're not cheap, and it may make sense to use money to create more miles of unlandscaped bike lanes, but in some instances (especially the "ideal" ones) the extra expense could be worth it.

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  19. Comment by Chris I June 22, 2018 @ 3:12 pm | Link

    What year is this? People call things on phones?

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  20. Comment by maxD June 22, 2018 @ 3:06 pm | Link

    The speed limit is 40 mph. Observed speeds (median) are 53 in one direction and 56 the other. PBOT wants this to be free-flowing, but they have also adopted Vision Zero. The speeds on Greeley are not for people driving. This project is the sole opportunity PBOT will have to introduce design changes that can encourage drivers to obey the speed limit. Design tools like speed bumps or chicanes will not work here because it is a freight route. Increased signalization and narrower driving lanes are 2 design changes that have been shown to decrease driving speeds, could work on Greeley and are not being considered.

    From my perspective, PBOT has ONLY designed this project through the lens of moving freight. The have ignored the implications to the traffic systems outisdie of this stretch that will be adversely impacted by hte higher speeds induced by these wider lanes. They have also not addressed the safety implications caused by creating a bike route on an existing concrete walkway. PBOT could address these issues if they acknowledged the problem, but unless they hear from people, they will treat this project as providing a single solution to a single problem: freight wants to move more quickly and freely. Ask them to do more and they will be able to do more- this project can accomplish multiple goals with some creativity and careful design.

    Once this project is built, PBOT will not touch Greeley for another 15-20 years.

    In response to Greeley bike path project delayed again, not expected until spring 2019 Array


  21. Comment by paikiala June 22, 2018 @ 3:06 pm | Link

    And you've called it in, yes?

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  22. Comment by paikiala June 22, 2018 @ 3:05 pm | Link

    Without any information, you've presumed motive, intent, or some other malfeasance. The most likely explanation is something was discovered after work began that needs to be addressed first. And not all 'projects' are designed. Some are ad-hoc by maintenance.
    You describe an unimproved road, where berms were built and no curb directs storm water, and then lump all of PBOT together. Sort of like saying some drivers are bad, so all drivers are bad. What road?
    Berms built in bike lanes, or on roadsides of center strip roadways?
    Sand is used to reduce the tackiness of the uncovered edges of seal coat placed on old roads after new asphalt is applied.

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  23. Comment by paikiala June 22, 2018 @ 2:56 pm | Link

    What's your expertise in road maintenance, please.

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  24. Comment by paikiala June 22, 2018 @ 2:55 pm | Link

    Do you know how much it costs (your tax dollars) to maintain narrow medians with landscaping? protected bike lane islands are usually all concrete.

    In response to What's going on with the North Rosa Parks Way project? Array


  25. Comment by Ted G June 22, 2018 @ 2:38 pm | Link

    On their project website PBOT describes Greely as a high-speed corridor with heavy freight vehicle traffic. I did not read anywhere that PBOT is interested in changing that. It sounds like you think slowing traffic down should be the purpose…but it’s not. The design is intended to allow traffic to move freely along Greely while making things safer for cyclists, which I think it does. I think your suggestions for the connector path to Interstate are good ones, but without knowing the constraints along that area, we cannot know if they are possible. So while I understand your desire to slow everyone down and make the experience of riding down Greely better for cyclists, that is not the purpose of the project and the design reflects that.

    In response to Greeley bike path project delayed again, not expected until spring 2019 Array


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