BikePortland.org

ODOT needs your input on Oregon Coast Bike Route Plan update


Riding in a narrow shoulder just south of Waldport.
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

What iconic Oregon bikeway is 370 miles long, connects 38 campgrounds, supports 670 full-time jobs and spurs $56.3 million in tourism spending? The Oregon Coast Bicycle Route (OCBR).

And it does all that despite a lack of strategic planning or updates since it was established in the early 1980s. Now that will finally change thanks to an effort by the Oregon Department of Transportation that has taken a significant step forward.

As we reported back in January, ODOT has been working on a major update to the OCBR. This morning they launched an online open house and they want your feedback on how to improve the route and to make sure the plan is headed in the right direction.

Here’s more from ODOT:

The public has a chance to provide input and share ideas about improving the OCBR by visiting an Online Open House through Jan. 31, 2019. The public input and ideas will help ODOT to better understand where the issues and gaps are along the route.

While ODOT does not currently have funding identified for improvements, the Oregon Coast Bike Route Plan will set the stage for future investments. The plan will identify needs and prioritize improvements to the route to increase safety, accessibility and enjoyment for residents, visitors and all users.

It has been over a decade since the OCBR was evaluated and no comprehensive planning work has ever been completed. With the changes in bicycle infrastructure standards, and the growth of bike tourism destinations and travel options both nationally and along U.S. 101, ODOT believes it’s the right time to do this work.

Advertisement

Screenshot from online open house.

Once complete, the new Oregon Coast Bike Route Plan will define the route, identify ways ODOT and local agencies can make it better, and create a list of high-priority projects.

The online open house features an interactive map of specific locations where ODOT is considering improvements. You can learn more about the background of this project, view potential changes, see what the critical needs are, and view next steps via the online open house.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

Never miss a story. Sign-up for the daily BP Headlines email.

BikePortland needs your support.

Exit mobile version