Comments

At BikePortland, we think your comments are just as important as our stories. This page lists all comments made on BikePortland.org, with recent comments at the top.

If you love great comments as much as we do, check out our Comment of the Week column. Please help us find more great ones by simply typing "comment of the week" in a comment.

Return to the Front Page.


  1. Comment by Steve Durrant January 13, 2022 @ 5:49 pm | Link

    Before the Swedes brought us Vision Zero, I asked the other board members of the League of American Bicyclists if anyone thought we should celebrate killing only half as many people as we did that year. Could we celebrate only 25%? How about setting a goal of zero?

    In response to Metro's new Vision Zero video is brilliant Array


  2. Comment by Philips January 13, 2022 @ 5:35 pm | Link

    Serious question; what are we paying PBoT for?
    Almost every new project somehow manages to be simultaneously too much and yet not enough. They do a horrible job maintaining and managing roads and bike lanes. Even glitzy new projects are forgotten and left to descend into negligent decay nearly as fast as they are completed.

    It seems like their core competency is holding meetings and pushing out cutesy advertising collateral. I would imagine the department is chock full of fresh faced masters-educated best and brightest who have pilgrimaged to hollowed land of Portlandia in the hopes of creating utopia when instead they are making a mess.

    I predict in ten years we are going to be tearing all this crap out and doing it right. A waste of time and resources.

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  3. Comment by ChadwickF January 13, 2022 @ 5:14 pm | Link

    I'm glad someone's talking about the amount of asphalt in cities.
    It wouldn't be much at first in the overall scheme of things, but I have been thinking how nice it would be if my street, a neighborhood street, weren't overall so wide. More trees, less speeding, more hell-strip planting, less (maybe a bit) of the heat island effect, etc., etc. It seems like something like narrowing neighborhood streets could at least help the total amount of asphalt a tiny bit, and perhaps add up to something significant over time, and have the added benefit of livability.

    In response to Podcast: Veteran advocate and new Portlander Cathy Tuttle Array


  4. Comment by David Hampsten January 13, 2022 @ 5:10 pm | Link

    I feel a certain irrational responsibility for the fixes at 108th & Everett. During the EPIM process (2010-2012) when we were designing the 100s bikeway, I made some vague suggestions to PBOT staff that they look into traffic circles there. I regularly passed through there between my townhouse at SE 105th & Pine and the EPCO offices at 117th & Pacific (on the HOP). It is a poorly designed and long neglected piece of broken infrastructure that needed a lot of love. Even in 2010 cars would go flying through there while kids would play on the street nearby, so I'm really glad they are now experimenting with various improvements there.

    The video is very helpful. Given the mess that is East Portland, IMO these pieces of infrastructure work really quite well by confusing all users equally, particularly fast drivers, as everyone slows way down to navigate the mess. The mountable curbs are only mountable at slow speeds - any vehicle going over 45 is going to get some damage. The potholes are a nice touch.

    NE Oregon & 108th is where two greenways meet - the 100s and the HOP - so I'm glad they maximized the traffic circle radius there.

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  5. Comment by Asher Atkinson January 13, 2022 @ 4:44 pm | Link

    Thanks for the reviews. It’s really nice to see BikePortland covering products as well as news.

    I make a distinction between riding and commuting gloves. For winter commuting in the rain I prioritize dry over warmth and fit, so I have some insulated rubber gloves I found on Amazon for < $15.

    https://www.amazon.com/Chemical-Resistant-Wells-Lamont-194/dp/B000BPUFFO

    For longer rides I have an assortment that have been collected over the years. I’ve had good luck with PearIIzumi 5 finger and lobster style gloves. For me on cold rides lobsters are essential.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  6. Comment by EP January 13, 2022 @ 4:36 pm | Link

    The bigger problem east of 205 are the wide roads with wide center turn lanes. They get used as passing lanes all the time. The problem near intersections is that traffic will stop in the two through lanes, and some cars will queue up in the center, left-turn only lane. Then, impatient drivers 30+ cars back (that want to also turn left) will speed down the center turning lane, passing all the stopped cars backed up at the intersection. The danger comes when other/oncoming cars are actually using the center turn lane to turn left across traffic and into roadside businesses, streets, etc. It's a weird east portland thing (i think?) where people just view that middle lane as their own personal express lane. It leads to sketchy situations, at best.

    So the poles are there to stop the idiots from being dangerous. But then they outdid themselves by just driving into oncoming traffic to get around the poles. The future solution is more concrete center dividers and islands, and then more robust ones around intersections and left-turn only lanes, and eventually the people will learn how things should work. But no budget, so yellow poles as a test, that people run over and complain about. I think they would've been more successful if there were several rows of yellow poles spaced out 20' apart or so.

    In response to ODOT installs plastic curbs and posts at deadly NE 82nd and Alberta crossing Array


  7. Comment by Benn Schonman January 13, 2022 @ 4:29 pm | Link

    I've been using a pair of Craft 'lobster' gloves with wool liners inside...toasty fingers!
    Longer glove which widens at the base so it covers your jacket cuff keeping in more heat plus velcro to close.
    Not completely waterproof and they do breath.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  8. Comment by PS January 13, 2022 @ 4:00 pm | Link

    I used to fret about this, but now if it is colder than 40 degrees and raining, I just head to the trainer and bang out a hard workout. No sense in dealing with the weather much less the road conditions and jeopardizing being able to ride when it is actually enjoyable.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  9. Comment by Josh Ross (Contributor) January 13, 2022 @ 3:05 pm | Link

    Just about every Sunday ride I did through December was right around 32 degrees and constant rain for about 7 hours. I've experienced frost bite in the past and I'd rather not revisit that experience.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  10. Comment by Josh Ross (Contributor) January 13, 2022 @ 3:00 pm | Link

    I specifically mention the showers pass knit gloves. Great gloves that a lot of people love but aren't warm enough for me when it's December/January. I love them in the spring and fall.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  11. Comment by squareman January 13, 2022 @ 2:49 pm | Link

    It's a sad state of affairs that American drivers need to be reminded to Keep Right at all. And even then, most know – they just don't give AF.

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  12. Comment by Granpa January 13, 2022 @ 2:41 pm | Link

    The necessity of the gloves to keep hands dry is overblown. (Especially at $160 a pair!). Wet but warm are happy hands. I am quite satisfied with Head “Runners Gloves “ that I bought at Costco for $12.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  13. Comment by SolarEclipse January 13, 2022 @ 2:38 pm | Link

    I went and checked out Nextdoor and finally found that someone posted an email from a PDOT employee that said the experiment was a failure and they'll be removing them.
    Also, they stated the intent was to show where the left turn lane began. News to me as I kept scratching my head trying to figure out their purpose.
    It's too bad they chose such a poor device to try and guide traffic. As you say concrete dividers of some sort instead would have been better. But of course, with ZERO enforcement people would drive around them (though I never saw that myself).
    You'd think after 100+ years of automobile use around the world that there would already be ways to do what they want without having to reinvent the wheel. No wonder folks don't trust them to do anything right.

    In response to ODOT installs plastic curbs and posts at deadly NE 82nd and Alberta crossing Array


  14. Comment by PS January 13, 2022 @ 2:34 pm | Link

    Do they make them so easy to drive over for emergency vehicles? I can imagine most vehicles are able to just drive over them like most people do to the round abouts in Bend.

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  15. Comment by squareman January 13, 2022 @ 2:30 pm | Link

    Mountable islands, what will PBOT think of next? /s

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  16. Comment by Zach R January 13, 2022 @ 2:28 pm | Link

    That's too bad that the two circles at Everett missed the mark. Good infrastructure should be intuitive for all users and now the confusion makes it hard for vulnerable road users to anticipate what a driver is going to do. I find myself wondering how a simple round concrete planter, like the ones recently added on the greenways, placed in the location of that center rectangular curb would perform in comparison. I feel like it would have slowed down the traffic, kept the logic of a roundabout (a center of the road obstruction), and not pushed vehicles as far into the pedestrian zone as this new treatment seems to.

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  17. Comment by squareman January 13, 2022 @ 2:25 pm | Link

    That's what I discovered with "seal skin" socks and the neoprene. First they are a bear to get on and off. Second, I think my feet sweat almost as much as any water that would have come into my shoes. I still have them but haven't used them again. Generally my plans for socks in the rain are in escalating order:

    1. wear no socks at all, your feet are gonna get wet anyway
    2. if it's chilly, but not down pouring, wear your wool socks
    3. If it's both cold and down pouring, consider those seal socks, but – ugh!

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  18. Comment by squareman January 13, 2022 @ 2:22 pm | Link

    I'm always amazed at gloves meant for riders in the winter that include absolutely zero retroreflective material on the gloves. It should be an automatic given.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  19. Comment by hamiramani January 13, 2022 @ 1:53 pm | Link

    I'm a bit surprised that PBOT would install these projects in concrete before piloting something less concrete to see how they work (especially the double roundabouts). Also surprised that there is no signage indicating the direction of traffic flow which seems standard for many of the roundabouts I've seen around town; perhaps signage is part of the finishing work to be done?

    In response to Video: A closer look at PBOT's three new roundabouts on NE 108th Array


  20. Comment by Todd/Boulanger January 13, 2022 @ 1:31 pm | Link

    Hi Ivan, thanks...yes, I can see that now...I usually catch that design type but the double curve threw me off.

    In response to A closer look at the reconfigured, painted, and calmed Lincoln-Harrison-30th intersection Array


  21. Comment by Andrew Kreps January 13, 2022 @ 1:27 pm | Link

    They started re-redoing it right after you took these photos, you should go back and have another look in a week or two.

    In response to A closer look at the reconfigured, painted, and calmed Lincoln-Harrison-30th intersection Array


  22. Comment by Andrew Kreps January 13, 2022 @ 1:25 pm | Link

    I was really surprised to find no discussion of Shower's Pass' 9 different glove options in the article. They're pretty great.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  23. Comment by EP January 13, 2022 @ 12:59 pm | Link

    Nextdoor is abuzz with the news that PBOT will be removing those posts and all the old angry people are happy. Apparently too many drivers were swerving into oncoming traffic to go around them… These continuous center turn lanes are such a hazard. More pedestrian islands and concrete dividers, PLEASE!

    In response to ODOT installs plastic curbs and posts at deadly NE 82nd and Alberta crossing Array


  24. Comment by Phil January 13, 2022 @ 12:55 pm | Link

    Bike Gallery put me onto the Endura Strike glove when my knit Showers Pass gloves (which are wonderful, waterproof, and warm down to about 40) are not warm enough for colder rides. Endura is a Scottish company, so these are designed for weather similar to ours (dreich). They have been great for rides in the 25-35 degree range, around 3 hrs, and in rain or dry cold.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


  25. Comment by Boyd January 13, 2022 @ 12:41 pm | Link

    I'm personally a fan of the showers pass crosspoint knit gloves. Only gripe is they don't have capacitive touch screen patches. But they are relatively cheap, and they work great in Portland's climate. I've lived and biked year round in places that get really cold. I would not use them there. But if temperatures rarely dip below freezing, the cross point is more than adequate.

    In response to Warm hands, happy rider: An overview of winter gloves Array


Comments