A backwards incentive in Portland, where bus rides cost more than parking spaces

by on November 17th, 2015 at 10:07 am

Bike-Bus leapfrog -1
We’ve made driving both cheap and convenient even though it causes a whole lot of problems.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Though lovers of bikes, transit and walking hate to admit it, driving a car is often the most convenient way to get around Portland. Until we start reconfiguring our roads to give more space to bicycling and dedicated transit lines, that will likely remain the case years into the future.

An odd thing about driving is that not only is it usually convenient; it’s also usually pretty cheap.

The question is, why are we also going out of our way to make driving so cheap?

At least, that’s the question asked Sunday by Tony Jordan, a member of the committee that’s currently advising the city on whether it should raise its downtown parking rates from $1.60 to $2 per hour.


Nike building paved path to connect headquarters to MAX station

by on November 11th, 2015 at 10:00 am

Map from internal Nike employee email showing location of Nike Woods Connector Trail. The MAX station is on the bottom and the Nike campus is on top.

Nike is building a new paved path that will make it easier to bike, walk, and take transit to their World Headquarters in Beaverton.

TriMet will hand out free lights and safety gear at ‘Be Seen Be Safe’ event

by on November 10th, 2015 at 2:46 pm

Be Seen Be Safe event-17
Showing off a pair of high-viz gloves at a TriMet safety event in 2010.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

In what has become something of an annual event to encourage walkers and bikers to be more visible, TriMet is hosting a “Be Seen Be Safe” event tomorrow (11/11).


TriMet survey finds no clear answers for cutting bikes-on-MAX crowding

by on November 4th, 2015 at 10:19 am

bikes on max-1
Bikes and people squeeze
onto a MAX train.
(Photos © J.Maus/BikePortland)

Many people who take their bikes on MAX have had to skip a train at least a few times because it’s too full of people.

But park a bike at the station because all the hooks are full? Not so common. Most riders will wheel it on anyway if they can, even if it’ll block other people from boarding down the line.

Those are two findings from an online survey, conducted as part of TriMet’s bike plan, that explored the problem of people trying to take their bikes on MAX and bus but running out of space.

Here’s the question about skipping trains that can’t fit a bike. 21 percent of respondents said this happens to them “often,” and another 38 percent said they’ve done so once or twice:


Portland Timbers clarify: No season tickets required for bike parking

by on September 28th, 2015 at 3:34 pm

timbers bike parking
Yes, anyone coming to the game
can use the Timbers bike parking.
(Photo: Providence Park)

A Portland Timbers spokesman straightened out misconceptions about the soccer team’s rules for bike parking in an interview Friday.

Last week, a Timbers fan wrote us to report that he and his wife had biked to a game but been told by Providence Park staff that the big temporary bike racks were for Timbers season ticket holders only. He’d then asked several other attendees, who said they had the same impression.

That’s not the case, Timbers Vice President for Communications Chris Metz said Friday.


First Look: Lafayette Street pedestrian bridge crosses inner SE railroad tracks

by on September 15th, 2015 at 3:07 pm

ped bridge wide
The new bridge replaces a wooden one from approximately 1943.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

One of the big obstacles to biking in south-southeast Portland has once again been bridged.

Along with the opening this weekend of the new Orange MAX Line and the Tilikum Crossing, TriMet opened a new Lafayette Street pedestrian bridge across the Union Pacific Railroad tracks in the Brooklyn neighborhood.


TriMet police stake out new train-track crossings east of Tilikum Crossing

by on September 1st, 2015 at 3:33 pm

Portland’s regional transit agency is trying to educate people about navigating the new expanse of pavement near the corner of SE 8th and Division.

With the new Orange Line due to begin service on Saturday, Sept. 12, transit police have been stationed in the area issuing formal warnings to people who break traffic laws such as crossing the tracks after a train has passed but before the warning signals have stopped ringing.

Here’s the statement TriMet put out about this effort last week:


First Look: Southwest Moody is now probably Portland’s best street to bike on

by on August 14th, 2015 at 5:09 pm

moody lead
The new coloring and lane sorting makes things much more intuitive and comfortable for people biking and walking.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Just in time for Tilikum Crossing’s public preview last weekend, TriMet and the City of Portland unveiled a new design for the main street leading to the South Waterfront.

In two words: It’s fantastic.


By the tens of thousands, Portlanders preview their new car-free bridge (photos)

by on August 9th, 2015 at 6:21 pm

An estimated 40,000 people crossed Tilikum Crossing Sunday on foot, bike, skateboard, scooter or wheelchair.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

With walkers and in strollers, on hopalongs and (in the case of quite a few happily panting dogs) on leashes, Portlanders packed a series of previews Sunday of Tilikum Crossing, the first bridge in the United States to carry buses, bikes, trains, streetcars and people walking but no private cars.


It’s time: Bridge Pedal will open Tilikum Crossing Sunday, followed by ‘The People’s Preview’

by on August 3rd, 2015 at 3:30 pm

Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People
Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People.
(Photo: TriMet)

If you, like us, have spent the last five years dreaming of the day you’ll be pedaling across Portland’s lovely new car-free bridge, this weekend is your first chance.

The Tilikum Crossing will temporarily open to bike traffic this Sunday, Aug. 9, for two events: first, the Providence Bridge Pedal, the paid ride that loops across Portland’s Willamette River bridges; and second, a three-hour open window that TriMet is calling “The People’s Preview.”