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First Look: Portland’s new protected bike lane on 2nd Avenue

by on August 11th, 2016 at 9:50 pm

New bikeway on SW 2nd Avenue-11.jpg
Northeast Portlander resident Gregg Lavender is overjoyed to have a protected lane.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

The City of Portland is slowly but surely adding dedicated bicycle access to downtown streets. The latest new bikeway is 2nd Avenue where the Bureau of Transportation has installed a half-mile of protected bike lane from SW Washington to Everett.
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Long-term plan for central-city bikeways moves toward council approval

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on July 15th, 2016 at 10:43 am

downtown portland bikeway map
Future central-city bikeways in the city’s proposed Central City 2035 plan. Dark green lines are “major” city bikeways, light green are other city bikeways. Green shading indicates a “bicycle district.”
(source)

Some recent updates to a map of future bikeways in Portland’s central city have advocates talking.

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Separation anxiety: Here’s why Portland isn’t building protected bikeways (yet)

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 31st, 2016 at 11:15 am

Screenshot 2016-05-27 at 6.18.19 PM
Cross-section of one approach to protected bike
lanes on NE 47th Avenue.
(Image: City of Portland)

After almost 10 years of talking about building networks of physically separated bike lanes on busy streets, Portland seems more or less ready to move.

Theoretically, that is.

Various small projects are already in motion. A downtown network is funded and ready to start public planning. The next mayor won election making protected lanes part of his platform, especially for east Portland. Voters just ponied up enough money to start the work. This week, city staff were in Seattle talking nuts and bolts with peers there.

All of which means that a city memo about the various obstacles to protected bike lanes is revealing reading.

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City debuts new ‘Tuff Curb’ to create physical separation for bikeways

by on May 12th, 2016 at 3:15 pm

City crews installed a new plastic curb at SW 13th and Clay today.(Photos: City of Portland)

City crews installed a new plastic curb at SW 13th and Clay today.
(Photos: City of Portland)

Hallelujah! At long last the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation is using an actual curb to separate bike-only lanes from standard vehicle lanes.

For years PBOT has struggled to figure out how to cheaply and quickly add physical separation. They’ve tried using plastic wands but those rarely last more than a few days before they’re hit and ripped out by people who can’t control their cars. PBOT’s most recent attempt to help separate the bike lane from encroachment by motor vehicle operators came in the form of “rumble bars.” Those failed too.
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Protected bike lane boom: Nine city projects will have physical separation

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 11th, 2016 at 1:28 pm

Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat’s decision last year to make physical separation the default design for bike lane projects is starting to pay off.

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New plan would make East Portland’s Gateway district the bike-friendliest in the city

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 10th, 2016 at 5:16 pm

halsey bus stop
NE Halsey with a very nice bike lane and bus stop.
(Image: Portland Development Commission via Nick Falbo)

It looks as if the commercial district just east of Gateway Transit Center will have parking-protected bike lanes and bus stops by this time next year.

No other business district in the city has fully protected bike lanes; the closest is on Northeast Multnomah Street in the Lloyd District, but buses, bikes and cars there must still merge into “mixing zones” at intersections.

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Vancouver BC doubles biking rates in four years, likely passing Portland

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on May 6th, 2016 at 10:10 am

planters downtown
Hornby Street in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 2013.
(Photos: M.Andersen)

Three years ago, I got back from a trip to ride Vancouver BC’s new downtown protected bike lane network and promised every BikePortland reader a Japadog if our northern neighbor didn’t see a “substantial increase” in biking over the following three years.

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Green Loop brainstorm: Five ideas for a park to ring central Portland

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on March 21st, 2016 at 2:38 pm

alta green loop
Alta Planning/Greenworks envisions a green zigzag marking the path of a protected bike lane on N. Ramsay Way, just north of the Moda Center.

As Portland’s planning bureau talks about a future “Green Loop” biking and walking route around the central city, it’s just scored a burst of ideas from urban designers around the world.

A couple of the ideas even feature bikes.

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City proposes shifting future downtown bikeway from Alder to Taylor/Salmon

Michael Andersen (Contributor) by on February 16th, 2016 at 9:56 am

nw to se change with yamhill
The city has proposed to change the future bikeway that would be the fastest dedicated biking route from the Northwest District to the Central Eastside. (People would be able to choose between a longer jog south to Salmon or a shorter one to a lane of Yamhill shared with cars, presumably with diverters to hold down traffic.)

The city says there’s no room for future bike lanes on the most direct street between Northwest Portland’s fast-growing residential area and the Central Eastside’s fast-growing job district.

Instead, inner Southwest Alder Street is slated to become a “trafficway” offering automobile and truck connections to the Morrison Bridge and interstate highways.

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On bikeways, paint matters when it’s all we’ve got

by on February 12th, 2016 at 3:30 pm

NE Multnomah Bikeway
The bikeway on NE Multnomah is only as strong as the paint that protects it. In this photo, notice how people park in the bikeway buffer in the foreground where it lacks paint versus how people park in the background where the paint is more visible.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

There are a lot of reasons why using only paint to separate bicycle operators from motor vehicle operators is problematic. Today I’ll share an example that speaks to the importance of maintenance.
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