clackamas county

ODOT says $3 million project to raise overpass 18 inches has no budget to add a sidewalk

by on May 15th, 2015 at 9:51 am

strawberry lane overpass
The overpass is being raised so that large-load trucks can drive under it rather than detouring onto Strawberry Lane.
(Images: Google Street View)

Despite receiving a dozen public requests to add sidewalks to an overpass it’s planning to raise by 18 inches, the Oregon Department of Transportation says there’s no room for them in the $3 million project.

Instead, ODOT will add a five-foot-wide striped walking and biking lane on the bridge’s eastbound side. The road-level lane will be marked with a pedestrian symbol.

The Strawberry Lane bridge south of Clackamas is the only crossing of Interstate 205 for one mile in each direction.

As reported Wednesday by the Clackamas Review, the purpose of the project is to raise the overpass enough to prevent most large-load trucks from having to detour onto Strawberry Lane in order to avoid the relatively low bridge.


Clackamas County launches survey to guide their new bike map

by on March 5th, 2015 at 4:24 pm

(Image: Clackamas County)

Even if you carry a smartphone, there are still a few times when paper does some jobs best. One of those times is the middle of a bike trip.

Clackamas County is updating their Bike It! map and has launched a web survey this month to get advice on what the new version should offer.

Last year, we wrote about the county’s virtual open house to gather information about the best routes through the county to bike in. In this related effort, the county is working to figure out how best to convey route and destination information.


Multnomah County car registration is down 8% since 2007, and isn’t rebounding

by on March 3rd, 2015 at 10:20 am

Sunday Parkways Northeast 2011-31-40
Why look back?
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

The Great Recession has left plenty of marks on the Portland area. Here’s one of the happier ones: so far, at least, a lot of the cars aren’t coming back.

The number of registered passenger vehicles in Multnomah County peaked in 2007, a review of 16 years of state records shows. After the economy began shrinking in early 2008, passenger vehicles per resident started a rapid slide, landing 9 percent lower by 2012. Finally, in 2013 and 2014, the local economy began a relatively rapid rebound out of one of the sharpest local downturns in the country.

But in those two years, the number of vehicles the average Multnomah County resident registers has edged back up just 1 percent.


Two miles south of Portland, residents see a fresh canvas for car-lite development

by on January 8th, 2015 at 4:58 pm

trio bike
Oak Grove residents Chips Janger, Joseph Edge and Eleanore Hunter say TriMet’s new MAX line has made their inner-ring suburb ripe for dense bike- and transit-oriented development, and that neighbors are eager to help it happen.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

While Portland prepares to block increased development along parts of TriMet’s newest MAX line, a group of residents further down the Orange Line say they’re welcoming more density with open arms.

Their dream, they say, would be to use three-to-five-story apartment buildings and clusters of new small houses to turn their corner of unincorporated Clackamas County — the last stop on the new MAX line — into a bustling but more nature-rich alternative to Southeast Division Street.


Metro weighs anti-climate-change efforts against Clackamas County complaints

by on November 13th, 2014 at 12:10 pm

Clackamas County Commissioner
John Ludlow.
(Photos: Clackamas County)

As Chinese and U.S. leaders have been negotiating the first-ever bilateral deal to cut carbon pollution in both countries, some local government leaders have been calling for Americans to give up on carbon-reduction efforts.

Their argument: because they think China and other countries are unlikely to reduce their carbon emissions, Americans shouldn’t try to reduce theirs.

The fight matters to transportation because it’s playing out in the Metro regional government’s Climate Smart Communities Scenarios Project, which will influence the amount of money available to spend on new roads, freeways, transit lines and off-street paths over the next 25 years.

John Ludlow, chair of the Clackamas County Commissioners, has been one of the loudest voices for more roadway spending.

“When they continue to pour in money to bike paths they take it away from roadways,” he told the Portland Tribune for an article this week. “Freight can’t use a bike path.”


Clackamas County wants Metro to fight climate change by widening roads

by on October 30th, 2014 at 8:32 am

traffic on i-5 -1
Climate change in action — or inaction, depending on your point-of-view.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

This morning, Clackamas County’s commissioners are considering whether to urge the Portland region to attempt to fight climate change by adding more lanes to its freeways. (more…)

Sandy Ridge trail users report confrontations with mace-toting couple – UPDATED

by on March 11th, 2014 at 9:57 am

Sandy Ridge sign
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Users of the popular Sandy Ridge MTB Trail System are speaking out about an unidentified couple they say has repeatedly threatened and assaulted people during and after their bike rides.

According to allegations, an “older couple” has hiked up the mountain bike trails from the parking lot and “accosted” riders.

Members of the Sandy Ridge Trailhead Mountain Bikers Facebook group have been discussing the incidents since last month. One member of the group, Brian F., described an incident he claims took place on February 26th: (more…)

Clackamas County wants your input on biking and walking connections

by on February 11th, 2014 at 8:58 am

A map of possible routes along the Clackamas River.
“Principal” proposed routes are in red and “alternative”
routes in green. See below for more maps.

A two-week virtual open house launched Monday to give people who bike and walk in Clackamas County a chance to share their expertise and opinions on the best routes for the county to improve.

It’s part of the county’s year-long Active Transportation Plan, an effort to improve healthy mobility, access, safety, and tourism in the county on the south side of the metro area.

For the new virtual open house, much of the focus is on a series of possible walking and biking routes that have been selected from many submitted earlier in the process.


Mount Hood leaders map their course to become a bike-recreation Mecca

by on January 25th, 2014 at 4:08 pm

Sandy Ridge loop-6
The Sandy Ridge MTB Trail System is one of the Mount Hood area’s many bright spots.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

WELCHES – The slopes south and west of Mount Hood could become Oregon’s next great bike tourism destination, Clackamas County leaders said Saturday at a half-day conference here in the old volcano’s foothills.

“We are tourism-driven,” said George Wilson, a director of the Villages at Mount Hood and the organizer of the event. “It’s our only industry.”

It’s also an industry that currently booms each summer and winter and slackens during the “shoulder seasons,” as fall and spring are sometimes called in the Mount Hood area.


Bike projects win big with Clackamas County tourism grants

by on December 20th, 2013 at 11:19 am

Biking on and around Mt. Hood will get even better.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

The Clackamas County Tourism & Cultural Affairs office has announced 10 projects that will split $200,000 in grant funding and seven of the projects support bicycle-related tourism. This news will surely continue the strong momentum for bike tourism in “Mt. Hood Territory” that we reported on back in July.

These tourism development grants are funded through Clackamas County’s 6% lodging tax which was passed by voters in 1992. It applies to all lodging receipts over $15 per day from county hotels, campgrounds, events, vacation home rentals, and other types of lodgings.