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  #11  
Old 07-12-2007, 09:29 PM
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Nelson, do you happen to know if the Stub features hiker/biker campsites like many of the coastal state parks? the website says there are "walk-in" and "primitive" camp sites, but the great thing about the hiker/biker sites is you CAN'T drive up & walk in - thus there's always room for a cyclist, even on a Saturday nite in August.

I guess i could as State Parks, but you sound like you might know..?

sign me,

wanting to be sure i have a campsite after a lomg ride.
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  #12  
Old 07-13-2007, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpeedRacer View Post
Well let's pick one and see if at least a dozen or so bikeportland readers show up!
Random thought: The weekend of August 12th would be an excellent camping weekend, with the meteor shower....
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  #13  
Old 07-13-2007, 10:14 PM
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Okay, more info:

The Perseids meteor shower: http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2...atperseids.htm

The show will peak the night of Sunday, August 12th. This year, the new moon falls on August 12th, perfect timing! So the only major light in the sky competing with the meteors will be the light pollution from the city. Which sounds like a great reason to ride a bike a long way away from the city where it'll be good and dark and stay up late staring at the sky.

I'm definitely planning on heading out for this one! Not sure where yet, but... A long ride in practically any direction would do the trick as far as reducing light pollution. Anyone interested in some sort of a group ride?
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  #14  
Old 07-14-2007, 01:52 AM
pdxtex pdxtex is offline
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so how do you guys transport your gear then? panniers? a trailer? on your back?!!! i could get away with a few cliff bars, bed roll and blanket, but have yet to consider the logistics of toting lots of gear. suggestions? on the lighter side, my recent trip down the springwater revealed more then 3 groups of resourceful bike transients that apparently had their own "campsites" along johnson creek.

Last edited by pdxtex; 07-14-2007 at 02:04 AM.
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  #15  
Old 07-16-2007, 01:35 AM
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panniers and a bungee for a couple things on top of your rack.
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  #16  
Old 08-12-2007, 09:02 PM
JessicaRoberts JessicaRoberts is offline
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Default McIver Park bike camping ride report

This weekend 4 of us went out to McIver state park. It was only a 25 - 30 mile ride from southeast Portland. I just tried to draw a google map but it was driving me nuts, so I'll have to just describe the route. We took the 40's bikeway south, did a dogleg on Steele to continue south on 46th, left on Ogden, and then south on 52nd until SE Flavel Drive (just south of Flavel, goes southeast at a wonky angle). Took Flavel Drive until it turns south and becomes Linwood, and took that south a ways. Right on Harmony, which becomes Sunnyside (and has some sketchy bits by the mall and the I-205 onramps). R on SE 132nd until the intersection with Clackamas Hwy/212/224. East on that for a bit, then south on 224 when they split. Take this until the Carver boat ramp, where you cross the Clackamas River, then left on S Springwater Rd. This road has no shoulder, and cars go really fast, but it seemed fairly low-volume, and very scenic. Now just take this for another 10-ish miles until you reach Milo McIver State Park on your left.

There's one hiker/biker campsite that's pretty nice, and set apart from the shrieking children and RVs. It has a firepit and you can buy firewood there. You can't reserve it, but the camp host told me that hikers/bikers have only come 3 times over the last year, so I think it's a pretty good bet.

If you did get there and all the campsites were taken, I would recommend biking to Estacada (4 miles away, not sure of the route) and then taking TriMet back (Line 31).

There's a sweet cafe at Sunnyside and 132nd called The Old Mill Cafe and Bakery. It's in a converted historical mill building, and they have good bike parking in the back. Standard brunch/sandwich stuff, prepared pretty well. Great tater tots too!

Last edited by JessicaRoberts; 08-12-2007 at 09:14 PM.
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  #17  
Old 03-19-2009, 10:24 PM
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Default Maybe it's time to resurrect this again.

I've got spring break coming up, (March 28th through April 5th—don't worry, I'll be back for the CRC rally) and I would love to get out on the road and try my hand at a bit of touring and camping by bike.

At the moment, I'm looking at three possible routes in general:
  1. Willamette Valley to Eugene and back [Too many routes to name]
  2. Columbia River Gorge (to Biggs/Maryhill and back) [~210 mi]
  3. Lower Columbia/Northern Pacific Coast (Longview–Astoria–Tillamook) [~195 mi min. (w/ bus to/from Longview and Sherwood)]

At the moment, I would put them in that order of preference and I'm leaning towards the trip to Eugene, as I've got family down there.

Does anyone have good experience riding and camping along these routes that would like to share their experiences? The last two are kind of specific enough to lend themselves to specific campgrounds, but I'm not so sure about ones in the Willamette Valley.

Now there's the camping itself. I've got a single-person tent, sleeping bag (20° C) with mat, along with a camp stove. I wouldn't leave home without bike repair tools too. As a first-time bike camper, are there any more seasoned riders with a bit of advice as to what I need to bring on my ride?
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  #18  
Old 03-19-2009, 10:32 PM
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Lightbulb Protection from the elements...

Both good weather and bad weather...

Sunscreen, sunglasses, a SPF chapstick

Lightweight Poncho (or large plastic bag), clothing to keep you warm after you stop riding. Fire starting tech, not just matches.

Have fun!
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  #19  
Old 03-20-2009, 04:23 PM
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Default willamette valley campgrounds

JR, good plan! There's a dearth of WV campgrounds, at least in the central valley. One idea (not saying it's a good 'un) is to discretely bivouac at the Willamette Mission State Park by the Wheatland Ferry, north of Salem about 15 miles or so. It's a sprawling park, so who would be the wiser? you may want to check to make sure it's open for the season, so the restrooms are operable.

From there, its about 90 miles (depending on route) to Eugene - very nice ride, through Salem & the Ankeny wildlife refuge , over the Buena Vista ferry & rolling down the east side of the river (Peoria Rd) to Junction City. --- consult the bike maps for Salem/Linn co., and the one for Albany/mid-Willamette Valley (if you can lay your hands on one) - both good maps.

& report back!
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  #20  
Old 03-22-2009, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jr98664 View Post
Now there's the camping itself. I've got a single-person tent, sleeping bag (20° C) with mat, along with a camp stove. I wouldn't leave home without bike repair tools too. As a first-time bike camper, are there any more seasoned riders with a bit of advice as to what I need to bring on my ride?
The cyclewild checklist is a good start:
http://www.cyclewild.org/articles/bi...gear-list.html
Any checklist at all is good for packing. For me personally: One or two changes of clothes is plenty: I'll do a little laundry in the shower if I'm on the road long enough to need it. I tend to pack simple foods. Cous-cous is super easy, just boil water, throw some cous-cous in with some salt or whatever else, and you've got a hot meal. (find it cheap in Winco's bulk section) A couple of things to snack on to get going, there's plenty of snacks available on the road. A few more straps or bungees than you think you need.

But mostly, plenty of time! That's been one of my biggest mistakes; not giving myself more time than necessary. I learned my lesson riding around the coast last year. I would have enjoyed the trip more if I'd been able to have a little touristy time. The worst that'll happen is that you'll get where you're going early.
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