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  #1  
Old 09-13-2008, 07:49 PM
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K'Tesh K'Tesh is offline
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Exclamation Personal encounter with Heat Stroke today...

I was in Portland today (9/13/08 ) checking on the status on the storm drains I called in last week, decided to Zoobomb back to Beaverton... Got off the MAX (bout 6:30 p.m.), took the West elevator, and while I was on it, a young lady sat down as we rode it to the surface.

When we got to the top, she stood up and was breathing oddly, so I asked her if she was Ok. She said that she thought that she was heat stroking, and she had heat stroked before.

Another lady and I helped her to the flat rocks and got her laying down, my camelback provided some water to get ther wet. She was able to call her parents to come and get her. She seemed pretty scared, but she had said that she didn't want EMS to be called. I didn't let on that I felt that was a bad idea. So, I left them to go down to the Zoo office, then went ahead and had Zoo security called. I returned with some water, and waited for the Zoo's security to arrive.

Fortunatly, she was awake, and aware of her situation, so we asked her questions, and she was able to answer them. We got some water into her, and while she was drinking it, Zoo security showed up and summoned EMS (despite her request not to). She was pretty shakey, and dizzy.

Her parents arrived minutes later. I gave my info, and was cleared to leave...

Heat Stroke people is serious... know the symptoms, learn what it takes to prevent it, and learn how to treat it.

The following is from Medicinnet.com:

Quote:
Heat stroke is a form of hyperthermia. Heat stroke is a true medical emergency that can be fatal if not promptly and properly treated. Symptoms of heat stroke include: high body temperature, absence of sweating, with hot red or flushed dry skin, rapid pulse, difficulty breathing, strange behavior, hallucinations, confusion, agitation, disorientation, seizure, and coma. A victim of heat stroke must receive immediate treatment to avoid permanent organ damage.

Heat Stroke symptoms:

Symptoms of heat stroke can sometimes mimic those of heart attack or other conditions. Sometimes a person experiences symptoms of heat exhaustion before progressing to heat strokes.

Some individuals can develop symptoms of heat stroke suddenly and rapidly without warning.

Different people may have different symptoms and signs of heat stroke. But common symptoms and signs of heat stroke include:
  • high body temperature
  • the absence of sweating, with hot red or flushed dry skin
  • rapid pulse
  • difficulty breathing
  • strange behavior
  • hallucinations
  • confusion
  • agitation
  • disorientation
  • seizure
  • coma

How do you treat a heat stroke victim?

Victims of heat stroke must receive immediate treatment to avoid permanent organ damage. First and foremost, cool the victim.
  • Get the victim to a shady area, remove clothing, apply cool or tepid water to the skin (for example you may spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose), fan the victim to promote sweating and evaporation, and place ice packs under armpits and groins.
  • Monitor body temperature with a thermometer and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102F (38.3-38.8C).
  • Always notify emergency services (911) immediately. If their arrival is delayed, they can give you further instructions for treatment of the victim.

How can heat stroke be prevented?
  • The most important measures to prevent heat strokes are to avoid becoming dehydrated and to avoid vigorous physical activities in hot and humid weather.
  • If you have to perform physical activities in hot weather, drink plenty of fluids (such as water and sports drinks), but avoid alcohol, caffeine, and tea which may lead to dehydration.
  • Your body will need replenishment of electrolytes (such as sodium) as well as fluids if you sweat excessively or perform vigorous activity in the sunlight for prolonged periods.
  • Take frequent breaks to hydrate yourself. Wear hats and light-colored, lightweight, loose clothes.
For what it's worth, she was wearing tight clothes, jeans, and a dark shirt... Wrong combination for a day like today...

Take care people, don't exert yourselves to hard this weekend, it's supposed to be hotter tomorrow...
K'Tesh
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Last edited by K'Tesh; 09-18-2008 at 12:49 PM.
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2008, 08:02 PM
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Exclamation Heat Exhaustion

Here's the http://www.medicinenet.com article on Heat exhastion:

Quote:
Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids. Those most prone to heat exhaustion are elderly people, people with high blood pressure, and people working or exercising in a hot environment.


Heat exhaustion symptoms

Warning signs of heat exhaustion include:
  • heavy sweating
  • paleness
  • muscle cramps
  • tiredness
  • weakness
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • nausea or vomiting
  • fainting

The skin may be cool and moist. The victim's pulse rate will be fast and weak, and breathing will be fast and shallow. If heat exhaustion is untreated, it may progress to heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. Seek medical attention and call 911 immediately if:

symptoms are severe, or

the victim has heart problems or high blood pressure.
Otherwise, help the victim to cool off, and seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last longer than 1 hour.

Heat exhaustion treatment

Cooling measures that may be effective include:
  • cool, non-alcoholic beverages, as directed by your physician
  • rest
  • cool shower, bath, or sponge bath
  • an air-conditioned environment
  • Lightweight clothing
Take Care People!
K'Tesh
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Last edited by K'Tesh; 09-13-2008 at 08:09 PM.
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  #3  
Old 09-14-2008, 07:37 AM
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wyeast wyeast is offline
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Excellent advice. I could tell you how fast a person can slug down gatorade after working in 100+ degree weather, but it ain't pretty.
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Old 09-14-2008, 10:05 AM
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Simple Nature Simple Nature is offline
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Good to see the difference... I've had the latter a few times.
For me, heat exhaustion usually sets in by letting my scalp be exposed to direct sunlight on a hot day.
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Old 07-26-2009, 10:35 PM
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Exclamation Time to revive this thread...

It's HOT out there!!! (and things look like they're gonna be bad all week... ick)

Please take all necessary precautions!

Be Safe!
K'Tesh
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  #6  
Old 07-27-2009, 12:32 AM
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spatialized spatialized is offline
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Default Hot with a capital "F"

Am so not looking forward to commuting by bike these next couple of days. Unfortunately, the alternative, bus/MAX/feet, is not much better. That said, I lived in Arizona for about 3 years and what we're having is nothing, comparatively, but I did learn some things there.

1. If you must exercise (all you runners and such out there), do it early in the morning when it is still cool(er). Or later in the evening when it has cooled off some.
2. Water really is your best friend. But if you are sweating a lot, don't forget to replace the electrolytes (sports drinks are great except for the sugar load, sometimes a small bag of chips is enough).
3. Stay in between 10 and 2, that's when the sun is highest and where you'll be exposed to the most UV rays. Why do you think so many culture have the idea of the afternoon nap (ala' the siesta as our Spanish-speaking friends say)?
4. Eat light meals especially if you have to be out working/riding/running/playing in the heat. You'll feel better for it.
5. Don't forget sunscreen.
6. While an ice-cold beer is a nice refreshing treat, it's worse for your re-hydration - limit yourself.

but most of all...

7. Enjoy the sun. We'll be crying that it's gone when we hit December!

Cheers,
Tom
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Old 07-27-2009, 07:02 AM
MrWolf MrWolf is offline
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From my personal experience in riding in the heat, i have found its wise to take it a little slower. Try to pick a more shaded route, (more downhill and less uphill a plus) and if you go by any sprinklers or fountains, go thru them and cool off. Always make sure you pack plenty of fluids for your commute.

Don't become another statistic and end up with a expensive and unexpected trip to the ER. Plan ahead and accordingly.
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Old 07-27-2009, 07:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spatialized View Post
3. Stay in between 10 and 2

is the sun really hottest at that time here in pdx? to me it always feels like the hottest part of the day is from about 3 or 4 to 7 or 8 in the evening...
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  #9  
Old 07-27-2009, 08:41 AM
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K'Tesh K'Tesh is offline
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Lightbulb Uploaded a link to a DIY Site...

Found a DIY on making your own Neck Cooling Wraps. You know, the ones that you add water to and tie around your neck to cool yourself off with.



I'll post pics of my creations (when I've got some made) Here.
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  #10  
Old 07-27-2009, 08:50 AM
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K'Tesh K'Tesh is offline
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Cool Some suggestions from The Oregonian's Hard Drive...

Even The Oregonian's Hard drive is taking notice about the heat...

Here's a link to Joseph Rose's blog entry on Biking throught the heat wave.

Stay Cool!
K'Tesh
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