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  #1  
Old 09-05-2008, 09:03 PM
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K'Tesh K'Tesh is offline
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Exclamation Bikes and SEX...

Thought that this would get your attention...





KPTV did a segment on how bikes can affect your sex life "Long after riding" (9/5/08 ).

Turns out that it's old news, linking pressure on the groin from riding that can yield to problems in men's capability in the bedroom.

Didn't find a link on their website, but I did turn up an article online.

Rubberside Down takes on a new meaning...
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Last edited by K'Tesh; 09-06-2008 at 10:18 PM.
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  #2  
Old 09-06-2008, 07:06 AM
flying_dutchman flying_dutchman is offline
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Did they discuss the strength that cycling builds in the heart and lungs? Did they discuss the weight control and muscle conditioning that cycling provides? Or how about the general sense of well being or dare I say happiness that fills an active cyclist. All of these things combine to benefit a cyclist's sex life.

My $0.02
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  #3  
Old 09-06-2008, 09:18 AM
Duncan Duncan is offline
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Default proof that bikes make you manly:

http://www.craigslist.org/about/best/sfo/765370039.html

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  #4  
Old 09-07-2008, 05:27 AM
Krampus Krampus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flying_dutchman View Post
Did they discuss the strength that cycling builds in the heart and lungs? Did they discuss the weight control and muscle conditioning that cycling provides? Or how about the general sense of well being or dare I say happiness that fills an active cyclist. All of these things combine to benefit a cyclist's sex life.

My $0.02
All that is useless if you can't get an erection.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/04/he...bicycle&st=cse

Interesting article (although older) about all of this. Yet more reason everyone should switch to Dutch bikes! Seems that the hunched over/leaning forward rider position of most modern bikes puts far more pressure on the perineum.


Last edited by Krampus; 09-07-2008 at 05:29 AM.
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  #5  
Old 09-07-2008, 08:57 AM
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Jeff Wills Jeff Wills is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krampus View Post
All that is useless if you can't get an erection.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/04/he...bicycle&st=cse

Interesting article (although older) about all of this. Yet more reason everyone should switch to Dutch bikes! Seems that the hunched over/leaning forward rider position of most modern bikes puts far more pressure on the perineum.
Those "noseless" saddles make it very difficult to ride- people don't seem to understand that the nose between the legs (OK... get your mind out of the gutter) is what stabilizes the bike when cranking hard.

Besides, the whole "bikes cause impotence" controversy was big news several years ago- and most of the "research" has been shown to be faulty.

OTOH, it does get passed around the recumbent world every month or two as a way to promote 'bents:


Jeff
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  #6  
Old 09-07-2008, 01:11 PM
Krampus Krampus is offline
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Not to sound snarky (as I don't intend it that way) but could you show me any articles (legit med source) that debunk this? To me it seems backed up from a medical point of view. I love cycling, but I also want to make sure that I give studies regarding potential negative effects from cycling a reasonable inquiry to see if there is any truth related to it.

I actually don't use a noseless seat. I have a big ol' teardrop Brook's saddle on an Azor frame (straight-up back posture), and I feel all my weight on my back butt as opposed to the perineum like I used to get when on my last bike (road bike that had me leaning forward a lot) so I'm not really worried with my current bike, but I (and I'm sure every other male cyclist) would still like more research done on cycling and impotence.
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  #7  
Old 09-07-2008, 01:38 PM
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wsbob wsbob is offline
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Duncan, that's a funny CL ad. Guy's quite the creative writer.

I have no idea whether how much credibility there is to the 'can't get it up bike seat syndrome'. Don't know of any studies on the topic. It makes sense that if you're jammin on your bottom end excessively, you could get some swelling that wouldn't necessarily be beneficial.

The bike I ride has a saddle with a depressed center line. I think it puts less pressure on the bottom end than the conventional hard saddle on my other bike, but I haven't ridden it for so long, I can't remember just exactly how they differ. Neither are very high quality saddles. Some of you are probably well aware that Brooks and Selle Marco have saddles indirectly designed to address this issue:

Brooks imperial saddle project

www.selleanatomica.com/

also, lots of talk on bikeforums about the Brooks:

bikeforums Brooks Imperial Saddle reviews
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  #8  
Old 09-07-2008, 02:54 PM
lefty175 lefty175 is offline
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So, there is, from what I've read, truth to the fact that it can cause problems. But I've also read and will try to find the articles, that the problem is mainly caused by people who have improper bike setups or sit the entire time on very long rides. Some of the articles I've read suggest that standing up every 15 minutes or so on longer rides helps decrease this problem. Secondly, a good bicycle fitting and an appropriately sized saddle tends to put the "sits" bones on the wide portion of the seat instead of placing your weight on the nose.
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  #9  
Old 09-08-2008, 10:16 AM
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beelnite beelnite is offline
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Default Home remedy

One thing I like to do is tilt the nose of my seat down a degree or two, but I'm up out of the seat a lot and a bit more compact than most riders. Not even sure if that's an approved ergonomic option when it comes to bike fitting, but tilting forward and sliding back the seat sorta puts me in "attack" position comfortably.

The boys are fine so far. For casual rides, I straighten and lower the seat just a tad so I can sit up and ride easy.

Don't do any of this if you're not confident you're properly positioned to avoid injury though. Any experts, let me know if I'm somehow playing with fire.
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  #10  
Old 09-08-2008, 11:17 AM
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djasonpenney djasonpenney is offline
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Default I agree it's a matter of fit.

The issue published by the press involves chronic pressure on a small artery running through one's perineum.

I just had two moles removed from that very area last week. (It turns out that is a very common place for moles. ) Both the dermatologist and I anticipated that I might have some discomfort while cycling during the healing period. She suggested I used gauze pads to avoid friction as well.

Not so and not necessary.

My weight is completely on my ischeal protuberances (the sit bones). I felt no discomfort whatsoever.

The bottom line is: if you saddle doesn't support your weight where it's supposed to, fix it or get a new saddle!

'nuff said
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