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  #1  
Old 07-17-2008, 10:06 AM
lefty175 lefty175 is offline
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Default Hybrid Pedals (i.e. Platform/clipless combos)

My commuter bike takes me everywhere and I greatly appreciate, when riding the flatland (i.e. to PSU, down to Saturday Market, etc.), wearing my regular street shoes/sandals; however, my parents live in the hills, thus I find myself going up that direction quite often and like being able to use clipless pedals. I also use clipless pedals when I'm carrying a heavier load, traveling further distances, or needing to go faster. Now, for some reason toe clips really really bother me so those are not an option. I've been looking at getting a pair of hybrid/combo pedals such as the ones seen here: Universal Cycles Shimano Pedals.

Has anyone used these types of duel platform & clipless pedal systems? Do they further limit float or the ability to toe-in or toe-out your foot? How is it riding them as flat pedals? Do they actually feel like flat pedals or they feel like clipless pedals with just a little bit extra?
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Old 07-17-2008, 10:09 AM
Jsnyder Jsnyder is offline
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Default Crank Brothers

I know a lot of people don't like the egg beater feel, but I love my crank brothers Candy C pedals. They have enough platform that I can ride in regular shoes or flip flops around town so I don't have to cleat up every time I get on my bike.
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  #3  
Old 07-17-2008, 10:21 AM
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wyeast wyeast is offline
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I have hybrids similar to the 324's. I don't like them terribly much, but I think that's more a function of the cleat setup, which I find very cumbersome and difficult to click in. (whether that's a function of the receiver, the cleat, or the MTB shoes I'm using, I'm not sure)

The platform side works just like a platform. However, there's a little bit of finagling involved since the weight balance of the pedal naturally puts the platform-side down. I don't mind so much since I usually go with heavier hiker-type shoes if I'm not wearing cleats, so I don't notice much if I'm accidentally pedaling on the wrong side. Not so sure if it'd be a hassle with something lighter like flipflops. Probably not a huge deal if you're going with street shoes occasionally. Might be more annoying if you're in streets more often than you are in cleats.

I'd be curious to find out if I have an easier time with something like a Crank Bros Mallet, but I'm not ready to shuck out the bucks yet, given that I'm just a casual rider, rather than a daily commuter.
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Old 07-17-2008, 10:28 AM
lefty175 lefty175 is offline
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I was looking at some of the Crank Brothers' stuff but I'm concerned about how much of the egg beater appears to protrude from the plane of the platform, and I wonder whether it would simply feel like pedaling on a standard egg beater with just a little bit more . . .
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Old 07-17-2008, 10:31 AM
Jsnyder Jsnyder is offline
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There is definitely a little bit of protrusion with the Crank Brothers but it doesn't really bother me. The Mallet's definitely have the most platform but the first time I rode them I thought they were almost too much platform.
Side not- IMHO Crank Brothers are the easiest cleat to get in and out of and I really appreciate that when I am downtown and clipped in.
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Old 07-17-2008, 01:14 PM
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djasonpenney djasonpenney is offline
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Default Try some Keenes

I bought some of the new Keene cycling sandals and I love them. They accommodate a mountain bike cleat (recessed), which is becoming more and more popular with all but the most hard-core (racing) roadie set.

Finally, the Keenes are relatively comfortable as a street shoe and look good.

FWIW, I use a Speedplay Frog pedal on my commuter bike. Lots of float, double-sided entry, virtually impossible to foul from debris: stomp-and-go launching from a stop light, and your feet come out almost magically when you want to get free.
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Old 07-17-2008, 02:37 PM
fredlf fredlf is offline
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Default Try the Shimano DH pedal

I don't like the hybrid pedals because you often have to look down to get them right side up, esp. when you're trying to clip in. The Shimano MTB Downhill/BMX pedal has a big rat-trap frame around an SPD clip. Thus, both sides work for both street shoes and cleats. Plus, mine are red which makes them very fast.
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Old 07-17-2008, 03:20 PM
lefty175 lefty175 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredlf View Post
I don't like the hybrid pedals because you often have to look down to get them right side up, esp. when you're trying to clip in. The Shimano MTB Downhill/BMX pedal has a big rat-trap frame around an SPD clip. Thus, both sides work for both street shoes and cleats. Plus, mine are red which makes them very fast.
Yeah, I was looking more at the ones with the double-sided entry. It sounds like they feel pretty good under regular shoes though, so I might try them out.

djasonpenney - The problem that I have with just getting a style of shoe that feels good walking around is that, sometimes, I just want to ride 10 blocks to the store real quickly without having to find/put on a specific pair of shoes. I'm using the Shimano M520s right now, while I wouldn't mind more float, I really want something that allows me to throw on the flip-flops and ride a few blocks OR throw on my cycling shoes and huff it around town.
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Old 07-17-2008, 03:25 PM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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I'd be happy if Speedplay would come out with a Frog/platform combination, myself. That said, ever since I got my cycling-compatible Keens, I haven't missed any of my other cycling shoes. But I agree, sometimes I just want to ride a bike without finding my cycling shoes. My most recent bike build just has flat pedals. I've got some PowerGrips, but have not installed them yet. You might look into those.

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  #10  
Old 07-17-2008, 04:06 PM
fredlf fredlf is offline
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Default street shoes with dh pedals

Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty175 View Post
Yeah, I was looking more at the ones with the double-sided entry. It sounds like they feel pretty good under regular shoes though, so I might try them out.
I often ride around the block with the dog or pop over to a friend's house wearing sneakers and the DH pedals work fine for that. If you have a real soft sole like a flip-flop or something, you can feel a slight lump under your foot where the cleats are. But the platform is big enough that you can just scoot your foot outwards a little. I don't think it would be very comfortable for more than 30-60 minutes of riding, but for little errands and jaunts in the 'hood it works just fine.

I actually also really like them on technical single track. You can keep one foot unclipped in a super-dodgy section and still have a big stable platform to stand on.

One downside, light they ain't.
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