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  #11  
Old 08-21-2008, 02:59 PM
Donald Donald is offline
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Default Sounds fair

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Originally Posted by Grant View Post
I don't know you, I'm not going draft off of you in the hope that you know what you are doing and are going to react how I'd expect if something unexpected crops up.

Thanks but no thanks.
I'll bet if you got to know me, you'd like me.

That said, I'm not asking you to draft me.

I'm just saying that if I'm drafting you up Williams, I'm probably just waiting for a chance to pass you. Any help you can give me would be appreciated. That bike lane gets narrower every day it seems.

But, BTW, I hold a good line and signal intentions and dangers. Promise I wouldn't lead you into any trouble. I dragged a nice lady all the way up the hill the other day. Always happy to help the humans when I can.
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  #12  
Old 08-22-2008, 09:54 AM
boneshaker boneshaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald View Post
But, BTW, I hold a good line and signal intentions and dangers. Promise I wouldn't lead you into any trouble. I dragged a nice lady all the way up the hill the other day. Always happy to help the humans when I can.
The problem is, how are we supposed to know who you are so we know it's OK to draft you? The point here is you never know who you're drafting. Maybe I get you and it's safe or maybe I get behind some wanker who isn't paying attention. That's why I don't draft when commuting and why I tell people to back-off if they try to draft me. Besides, if the wind is too much to deal with just get off and walk the bike. We're commuting here, not racing a crit.
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  #13  
Old 09-18-2008, 07:08 PM
vincentpaul vincentpaul is offline
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[QUOTE=boneshaker;14413Besides, if the wind is too much to deal with just get off and walk the bike. We're commuting here, not racing a crit.[/QUOTE]

+1 Too many people confuse cycling with racing. I don't see many auto drivers wearing Nascar outfits on their way to work, and it seems weird to me that so many cyclists run around w/ racing gear on.
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2008, 07:41 PM
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djasonpenney djasonpenney is offline
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Default Clarification...

Form fitting clothing means the clothes don't rub or flap when I'm riding, which in turn means it's less tiring.

Although I'm a strong believer in cotton for regular clothing, wool and synthetics win the day on the bike because of their moisture retention (non-)qualities.

Pockets in your pants don't work on the bike, hence the jersey pockets are the way to go.

Layers provide versatility with minimum weight, especially like yesterday where it was 45 degrees in the morning and 85 degrees when I started home.

A lightweight jacket that will breathe and yet repel moisture while I am flying along at 20 mph on my bike is spelled "Showers Pass Elite 2.0".

My point is that I have just outlined most of the characteristics of the pantie-waisted lycra crowd, and I'm not a racer. There are certain times of the year where I get away with street clothes, but I gravitate to the technical wear most of the rest of the time.

--jason "I draw the line at wearing team kits" p.

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Originally Posted by vincentpaul View Post
+1 Too many people confuse cycling with racing. I don't see many auto drivers wearing Nascar outfits on their way to work, and it seems weird to me that so many cyclists run around w/ racing gear on.
__________________
ORS 811.065 (1)(a):

The driver of a motor vehicle may only pass a person operating a bicycle by driving to the left of the bicycle at a safe distance and returning to the lane of travel once the motor vehicle is safely clear of the overtaken bicycle. For the purposes of this paragraph, a “safe distance” means a distance that is sufficient to prevent contact with the person operating the bicycle if the person were to fall into the driver’s lane of traffic....

LCI #2105 Lambchop Rides!
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  #15  
Old 09-19-2008, 02:30 PM
vincentpaul vincentpaul is offline
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Next time you're in a shop, look at Mountain gear. You'll see that it disobeys basically every rule you just stated. Somewhat loose. Non-form fitting. TONS of pockets. Etc. That's because its not designed for riders down in the drops in a racing posture. Unless of course you want to buy mountain race gear. In which case you buy....racing gear.
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  #16  
Old 09-22-2008, 03:14 PM
fredlf fredlf is offline
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Default Gear clothing

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Originally Posted by vincentpaul View Post
+1 Too many people confuse cycling with racing. I don't see many auto drivers wearing Nascar outfits on their way to work, and it seems weird to me that so many cyclists run around w/ racing gear on.
God, I get sick of the "lance wannabe" label. I wear typical tight, stretchy roadie gear when I'm on any ride (on- or off-road) that will last more than an hour. I wear it for all the practical reasons cited above (it's faster, drier, quieter, more comfortable, doesn't chafe, etc, etc). And I wear it because it's part of the fun for me. I like getting geared up before a big, hard ride. It helps me focus, it puts me in different mindset, it helps draw a clear boundary between what I was doing before and the ride I'm setting out on.

I too draw the line at team kit full of logos, however. Corporations should pay me to ride around with their giant logo on my back.

And honestly, you might not see drivers in Nascar fire-suits, but you sure see drivers in Porsches or giant off-road rigs that are wholly inappropriate for the, um, pedestrian task of getting from A to B and that will never be used for the activities they were designed for.

Last edited by fredlf; 09-22-2008 at 03:21 PM.
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  #17  
Old 09-23-2008, 09:36 AM
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beelnite beelnite is offline
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Default Hearing ya

Hear Hear!

I always wanted a sweet get up whilst riding, but never felt I could back it up with enough power and speed.

Comon, y'all sometimes gearing up for the ride is fun. For some it makes them feel fast... so they are fast. And going fast is fun and proper as long as you aren't scaring slower moving traffic.
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  #18  
Old 09-23-2008, 11:06 AM
lazlo lazlo is offline
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Some people seem to confuse "Lance wannabe" riding behavior with cycling clothes. I wear cycling shorts because they're comfortable while riding; stretchy, non chafing, flat seams. I don't put them on for a quick jaunt to the store, but I do for my 10 mile commute to work, or for a 50 mile weekend ride. Likewise jerseys; accessible pockets, zip front to regulate temperature. Throw in a pair of arm warmers and a light jacket, and I can ride in almost any Portland weather.
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  #19  
Old 09-23-2008, 12:23 PM
brock brock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vincentpaul View Post
it seems weird to me that so many cyclists run around w/ racing gear on.
Really, why do you even care? My commute is 15 miles each way. What I wear is based entirely on what is the most comfortable and efficient for spending two hours on the bike, very often in some nasty weather.
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  #20  
Old 09-23-2008, 04:21 PM
vincentpaul vincentpaul is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brock View Post
Really, why do you even care? My commute is 15 miles each way. What I wear is based entirely on what is the most comfortable and efficient for spending two hours on the bike, very often in some nasty weather.
Don't take offense, Brock. It was simply an observation on what seems to me a disconnect between the activity and the gear. I liked and understood Fredlf's explanation of why what I call "the kit" appeals to him, and I would suspect there are many riders like him that have the same motivations. That I don't find any of it necessary or useful doesn't mean I disapprove of Fredlf's views. Nonetheless, I still wonder why so much riding gear is more than a little bit impractical for non-racing use. I think I'd find the cycling gear of the 1890's more practical than most of the gear found in a bike shop today. Reasonably priced knickers and tweed jackets! Now we're talking practical bike gear...
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