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  #1  
Old 04-02-2008, 07:26 AM
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krystenr krystenr is offline
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Default No idea how to change a flat.

!!! !! !! !! !

pysch

Last edited by krystenr; 09-02-2008 at 09:56 AM.
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  #2  
Old 04-02-2008, 07:54 AM
Qwendolyn Qwendolyn is offline
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Default co-op

What you really need is somebody to show you.

If you do not know any more experienced cyclists, then I would go to one of the co-ops and have a mechanic show you how to do it.

PSU has a bike co-op, if you happen to be a student there.

Or maybe try the Repair Collective on 4438 S.E. Belmont
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Old 04-02-2008, 07:55 AM
whiney whiney is offline
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Default Help from the internets

A video and everything:
http://www.ehow.com/video_224_change-flat-tire.html
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  #4  
Old 04-02-2008, 08:10 AM
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nuovorecord nuovorecord is offline
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Here's a good, detailed "how-to"

http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/skills/fixflat.htm

What I do when I get a flat is to replace the tube, then repair the tube that had the flat and use it as a spare. It's easier to just replace the tube when you get a flat in the middle of a ride, as opposed to patching the tube by the side of the road.

So, if you're going to buy a new tube, you need to know what size and type you need. You can get the size tube you need from looking at the sidewall of your tire. You should see a number something like "700X23". Write that number down and look for a tube at the bike shop that will fit a tire of that size. Usually tubes fit a range of tire sizes, like 700X18-25. In this example, "700" refers to the diameter of the tire; "23" refers to its width.

One other thing you need to know is the type of valve your tube has. If it looks like one on a car tire, that's called a Schrader valve. If it's skinny, with a knurled knob on the top, you have a Presta valve. You should replace your tube with the same valve as the flat tube.

Tubes cost about $3.50 - $5.00.
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Old 04-02-2008, 09:12 AM
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krystenr krystenr is offline
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Default Thanks!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Last edited by krystenr; 09-02-2008 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 04-02-2008, 10:40 AM
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krystenr krystenr is offline
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Default

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Last edited by krystenr; 09-02-2008 at 09:57 AM.
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  #7  
Old 04-02-2008, 11:03 AM
Val Val is offline
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krystenr: Being confused is normal at this point - tire size nomenclature is ridiculously complicated. If you have a good LBS, you now have the right information for them; 27 X 1 1/4 is indeed your tire size. As nouvorecord mentions, you need to pay attention to the type of valve, but as long as that matches, the tube you want will probably say not only "27 X 1 1/4" but also "700 X 28-32" on it. These sizes are close enough that the highly elastic rubber tube will work for a variety of different tires. Hopefully you can get rolling again soon - rubber side down!
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Old 04-02-2008, 11:07 AM
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beelnite beelnite is offline
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Default Check out Sheldon Brown

The late, great Sheldon Brown posted some good advice on his homepage:

http://sheldonbrown.com/flats.html
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Old 04-02-2008, 11:37 AM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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Not that it will help you this very minute, but Bike Gallery has frequent free bike maintenance (and flat repair!) clinics

That said, you have a 27" tire (1 1/4 inches wide). I'm making a guess here that is is a Schraeder valve (looks like an automobile tire valve) tire.

A tube will run you about $5.

You'll also need tire levers to get the tire off the wheel and a pump. Get a patch kit, too, and patch your old tube so you can re-use it. Put the new tube in a plastic bag with some talcum powder before you re-install it. Makes it nice and slippery; less chance of catching it between the wheel and the tire.

Once you change your tube, you'll wonder why you ever had to pay someone to do it for you
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Old 04-02-2008, 11:39 AM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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Oh, and be sure to check your tire for embedded bits of glass (pick them out with a screwdriver or small pocketknife),thorns, wires and other sharp pointy things. Run your fingers around the inside of the tire, feeling for rough or sharp things. Saves you from fixing that flat immediately after pumping up the tire...
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