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Old 12-01-2012, 05:41 PM
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scaryseth scaryseth is offline
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Default Wet cold feet, Considering winter shoe/boots

I have been using clipless shoes for the past year. When it is dry and warm, they are perfect. But as it gets cold and especially wet, the shoes by them selves do not cut it. I have tried multiple thicknesses of wool socks. Have taped up on the inside the vents, that has helped a little, but moisture and definitely the cold are gets in. Sealing up the bottom where the cleat attaches did stop moisture from getting in from below.

I really do not want to use a show cover. I would have to take it on and off to get the shoe on. My thinking is it would also wear out and not last as long as a dedicated shoe would.

So that leads to wondering about winter cycling shoes. Commuting daily and as wet as it gets, seems like it would be worth the investment. Only concern is that they might get a little warm.

Anyone else had experience or recommendation for any winter cycling shoes or boots? I am looking for SPD comparable.
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Old 12-01-2012, 06:29 PM
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wsbob wsbob is offline
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I've no experience with winter cycling shoes or boots. They seem to be rare, so I'll also be interested in reading anyone's comments about how they work out. Ones I've seen, look like they'd be good for Alaska or Minnesota, but here, I don't know.

Shoe covers, or 'booties' have been a godsend for me. Wore em today. They're hard to put on, but only because I'm jammin' em over a pair of mountain shoes...model mountain shoe I have is essentially just the same as an economically priced road shoe...$80-$90, but with the lugged sole. Booties slip right over the road shoe I have. Booties are the Louis Garneau line from Performance, neoprene.

Unfortunately they're sized rather small. The XL fits over my sz 45/10.5 mountain or road shoes, but I think that's the limit. The wear issue is a concern, but unless walking around on them, it's just the 'toe-down' foot for stopping that's gonna get much wear. After some use, I just decided to cut out a piece of inner tube and shoe-glu it onto the toe. Works great.

Feet getting cold: Since I started being less concerned about maintaining 'cycle-chic', simple improvised solutions occasionally come to mind. I eventually figured out it wasn't the part of my foot in the shoe that tended to get cold near as the part of my lower leg around my ankle that was particularly susceptible to wind chill. Funky solution: cut off tops of heavy wool hiking socks whose soles have gone by the wayside. Put those on over the ankle part of the cycling socks. Then, like today, with the booties too, I'm toasty. When it's dry, not too cold, I just wear the anklets. Whole Earth Daddy look.
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Old 12-01-2012, 06:56 PM
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scaryseth scaryseth is offline
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My size is just about the same as yours as is the type of show. Size 46, mountain bike shoe, Shimano M087. I left out that I am a daily commuter along with the occasional weekend ride.

My usual routine for rainy weather, put on over pants. When I get to work, pull off the shoes and over pants and put on a pair of shoes I keep at work. So part of my also wants to keep the quick & easy change in mind. I also do walk a little with the shoes on, mostly when I hop on MAX to skip the climb to the zoo.

Good idea about mending the sole, I have a pair of toe covers that are pretty warn on the bottom. Will probably try patching with some rubber
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:58 PM
Alan Alan is offline
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Have you tried the "vapor barrier" trick? It's just a plastic bag outside the sock, inside the shoe; grocery produce bags do just fine, or small trash liners. Tuck them inside any rain paints so they don't collect drips.
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Old 12-01-2012, 10:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scaryseth View Post
My size is just about the same as yours as is the type of show. Size 46, mountain bike shoe, Shimano M087. I left out that I am a daily commuter along with the occasional weekend ride.

My usual routine for rainy weather, put on over pants. When I get to work, pull off the shoes and over pants and put on a pair of shoes I keep at work. So part of my also wants to keep the quick & easy change in mind. I also do walk a little with the shoes on, mostly when I hop on MAX to skip the climb to the zoo.

Good idea about mending the sole, I have a pair of toe covers that are pretty warn on the bottom. Will probably try patching with some rubber

I understand your interest in the 'quick easy-off'. The booties I have were reasonably priced, very nicely constructed, sleekly designed, but as I said...sized rather small, so I'd say you'd have trouble getting them over a sz 46 mountain shoe. You could try...clean up the shoes, take them in and try slip a pair over them...that's what I did. Of course, there's undoubtedly a number of other bootie designs, some of them likely looser, compromising on the sleekness priority to allow easier on-off.

For use with road shoes for people that have a crazy notion not to spend money to buy walkable cleat covers, another of my funky solutions, actually an experiment that I never have really used, but did have some potential: Found an old pair of thongs (ahem...the kind for your feet.), thick sole. Got the brainstorm to cut a rectangular section from the sole where the ball of the foot is positioned. Took a sharp knife, chopped out an area for the cleat to fit in. Took the drill, put two holes horizontally through the rectangular sole piece...ran a shoestring through the holes.

Use: place the cleat of the shoe in the hollow chopped out of the sole, bring the shoestrings over the top of the foot, tie. Walk. Basically worked good, quiet, a little awkward but basically comfortable to walk on. I used them a few times. It was kind of comical. They made me think of what it might be like to wear a pair of those Japanese wood shoes...'geta' I think they're called.

By the way...I've heard of the vapor barrier strategy using a plastic bag that Alan mentions. I actually tried that a few times. I didn't personally like the performance, but it's cheap and easy to experiment with. Booties were/are much better for me.
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Old 12-02-2012, 09:27 AM
Starkmojo Starkmojo is offline
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I use platforms and in the winter vasque sundowners with gators. The gators can be a drag but platforms let me use any shoe. Tevas in the summer and boots in the winter. But I also where a size 15 shoe so every shoe I own is special ordered and premium priced, so that may be part of my decision process.
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Old 12-04-2012, 08:12 AM
lovedoctor lovedoctor is offline
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I use a set of Shower Pass Booties that are more like a poncho for your shoes than the usual neoprene type that are very difficult to get on/off. These come on/off easily over my treaded mountain SPD shooes, and are pretty water resistant (but not waterPROOF). You do have to cut a hole for the cleat, and I do use an other elastic pant-cuff velcro strap at the top to seal off leakage, but they do the job and are far less frustrating to get over the shoe. The major downside is that you look like some kind of cycling elf with big, puffy feet.
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Old 12-04-2012, 01:32 PM
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q`Tzal q`Tzal is offline
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See also thread How do you keep your feet dry?

My choices are limited with big (13EE) feet. Before I coughed up money for a pair of SIDI's I was using SPD sandals and Seal Skin waterproof socks. This was my winter setup for Nebraska and proved acceptable for all but high impact water. You can't lift your feet EVERY time you have to go through a puddle and this is where they failed consistently. Oh, and Seal Skin socks need to be laundered and dried gently but frequently.

When I found the Carradice Pro route rainwear I found absolute wet weather protection. The Spats are my favorite: they go over the shoe and cover up to your knee. The zipper is on the very back and the underneath is open. It blocks all water but is not submersible.
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Last edited by q`Tzal; 12-07-2012 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 12-07-2012, 01:37 PM
DaveT DaveT is offline
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I use the Showers Pass booties as well; I've found a set will last me a couple of seasons before the sole wears out around the hole I cut for my cleats. These booties seem to be cut large; a pair of mediums fit over my size 10.5 Shimano mountain bike shoes. They keep my feet dry (as long as I don't submerge them) and warm. I do find putting them on half way to work when i don't have a step or something else to prop my foot on is kind of a pain, but other than that not bad for on/off.
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:10 PM
AJ08 AJ08 is offline
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I rode in the wettest conditions since I started commuting for work today and the Gore-Tex shoes I wore kept my feet completely dry. I like that I don't have to change shoes, deal with bags or booties or give them a second thought, they just keep my feet dry. I guess the only negative I can think of is that they're more expensive than regular shoes but I plan on getting them resoled when they wear down and I really only wear them when it's really wet which isn't all that often.

By the way, what does SPD compatible mean?

Last edited by AJ08; 12-07-2012 at 09:15 PM.
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