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  #1  
Old 06-23-2011, 09:58 AM
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Dovestrobe Dovestrobe is offline
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Cool Are Mountain Bikes dead?

I ride my diamond back sorrento everywhere and for the most part I rarely meet up with another mountain bike cyclist on the roads of portland. Why is that?

I like my bike. It's a tank. Weighs in at 35 lbs with added ulock and bike tail rack. Which is definitely not a bonus but definitely a work-out getting up Terwilliger with such a heft, could probably get to Salem and back with the same amount of energy expended on a common tour bike. I like the non drop bars for visibility and maneuverability. I like the durability of its fat tires with the added safety grip for Portland's gravely made streets by our beloved studded tires. One time I actually was saved stopping aggressively on the downward at SW 31st and SW Multnomah Blvd, literally did a twist slide stop. Just as I would have done with a sting ray bike back in the day.

Yes, I know what is in: fixies and road bikes.

Are mountain bikes destined for the trail alone?

Last edited by Dovestrobe; 06-23-2011 at 07:37 PM.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:38 AM
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wsbob wsbob is offline
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At least out here in Beaverton (6 miles west of Portland.), for general purpose riding, mountain bikes seem at least as common as road bikes, maybe more so. Goes back for quite a few years, but I think for a long time, people shied away from road bikes as some kind of 'wuss' thing...mountain bikes being for 'real men' and all that kind of crap.

Some off-road bikers in Portland have been p.o.'d for a long while, because there's hardly any single track dirt trail that's easily ridden to from close-in Portland neighborhoods. Lots of people though, nevertheless ride mountain bikes on downtown streets, despite the fact there's certain things about mountain bikes that don't make them great for efficient riding on pavement, such as higher bottom brackets and longer crank arms.
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:19 AM
dangdang dangdang is offline
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I rarely commute on my geared mountain bike. It's just too expensive to ride it around town. Plus it's a long travel bike too. Occasionally it comes to work with me... and sits next to my desk when it does.

I'm not into road bikes or fixies at all. Waaaaay too boring for my taste.
However, my cheap city/commuter is a single speed 29er mountain bike. It gets the job done. Sure, it's not as fast as a road bike... but I am never in that big of a rush.

It's set up with Kenda Small Block 8 tires... 2.1 inches wide and makes the commute quite enjoyable; especially if I plan on hitting up some loading docks / dirt jumps on the way home from work.

Last edited by dangdang; 06-23-2011 at 12:05 PM.
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:39 PM
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Dovestrobe Dovestrobe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dangdang View Post
Sure, it's not as fast as a road bike... but I am never in that big of a rush.
I agree!!! Sometimes I feel having the handicap of not too much speed has saved me from having a collision. My ability to anticipate wicked deeds of drivers or the drain laden road hazards is much better on my trusted MB!

Aside note: I was on the road today and saw a scooter claiming the car lane going up multnomah blvd sw and jeesh was he going slow for the cars. I know it's the law but,...Glad I wasn't him and about to be yelled at by angry motorists... almost as bad as claiming the lane on Sellwood bridge.

Last edited by Dovestrobe; 06-23-2011 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 06-23-2011, 05:04 PM
Alan Alan is offline
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Funny how such a simple question can spur the muses...

Just what is a "mountain bike," these days? Must it have suspension? Front and rear? Are flat bars and 26 rims mandatory or might a 29er with drop bars and knobbies count?

There are so many niches in the bike market these days that, overall, no single category can be a majority - hybrid, city, commuter, touring loaded or light, 'cross, TT, tri, crank forward, recumbant, cruiser, mountain, downhill, freeride, bmx...to name a few!

My "mountain bike" is far from dead, it's just repurposed into some sort of city/grocery/adventure/camping hybrid.

I see lots of commuter bikes which were sold as mountain bikes, some more modified than others, riding around and parked about town, and even quite a few lower-end full suspension bikes. I'd hazard a guess that those with higher-end suspension bikes are more likely to have a second bike for around town, one less theft-prone and more suited to spinning and street use.

I wonder if you might just be riding on routes which are more popular with roadies?

BTW, the Who rides what? thread has quite a range of rides in it, including plenty of mountain bikes.
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Old 06-25-2011, 06:15 PM
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Apennine Apennine is offline
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My bike is a mountain bike. But I put bar ends on the handle bar and changed the tires to slicks for doing hills when I was training for STP. Oh and toe clips. So is it still a mountain bike?
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Old 06-25-2011, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apennine View Post
My bike is a mountain bike. But I put bar ends on the handle bar and changed the tires to slicks for doing hills when I was training for STP. Oh and toe clips. So is it still a mountain bike?
If it was designed, frame up, with a mountain bike's frame geometry, it's still a mountain bike, even if some of the equipment that particularly suits the bike to off-road riding has been changed out to make it better for a different use.
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