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  #1  
Old 04-07-2011, 01:03 PM
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dmc dmc is offline
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Default Quick food without bike lock and bladder relief?

There are a couple issues I could use some guidance/input on.

I ride for recreation, fitness and for shopping. Unless I'm grocery shopping with my bike trailer I like my pockets empty (put everything in my seat bag) except for maybe a beanie or gloves. That being said, I don't pack a lunch and I feel that not having a lunch break has kept me, energy wise, from getting in the realm of 50+ mile bike rides. I don't want to pack on the extra weight of my u-lock or a backpack. What are your tips and strategies to parking your bike at the mini mart/fast food joint without a lock? I'm talking about a scenario where you would possibly have constant visibility through the window at your bike and your stay inside the establishment wouldn't be more than a couple minutes?

Sometimes nature calls when I'm out on a ride away from restroom facilities, especially in the winter months. I like to wash my hands and powder my nose just like the best of us, but when I have to go, behind a dumpster works. How do you all handle this issue? What do you look for? I currently look for dumpsters or alley ways with alcoves. I always feel too weird to walk my bike into some dense shrubbery. Its like a huge sign that says "IM GOING DOWN HERE TO URINATE OR DEFECATE OR POSSIBLY DO HARD DRUGS". Dumpsters and alleyways are quick, easy and more unseen than other options. I cant be the only one riding and sometimes the only thing on my mind is "where to relieve myself!?!?!" I really enjoy the "freeride" concept with no destination or planned stops. So I'm looking for "commando" options.

Please and thank you
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Old 04-07-2011, 10:23 PM
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lynnef lynnef is offline
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I'd recommend you re-evaluate your concept of what you should bring along on longer unsupported rides.

Outside of Portland proper, I've not worried much about leaving my bike and going inside.
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Old 04-07-2011, 11:54 PM
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wsbob wsbob is offline
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For a fifty mile ride, you probably don't need very much food. My steel bike has a fairly good sized seatpost bag that holds plenty of food if I don't want to stop. I generally hate coming near convenience stores, but if I was desperate, I'd probably see if the cashier would be agreeable to me bringing the bike into the store. When I rode out to Gaston, I brought the bike into the store and did exactly that. Nice people. Back of the store has a decent little quick food deli too.

Unless you're drinking a lot of beer while you ride, you shouldn't have to be peeing behind dumpsters. There's better places, such as gas stations. Take the bike inside. Buy some chewing gum or whatever. Smile at the nice attendant.

Riding out along wooded or forest areas though...no problem. We have plenty of that not too far away from the cities and burbs, especially the West Side, thanks to the UGB (urban growth boundary).
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynnef View Post
I'd recommend you re-evaluate your concept of what you should bring along
lol ,
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:05 PM
boneshaker boneshaker is offline
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most cycling jersey's have pockets in the back. There are many companies that make little frame bags, bento boxes or trunks as well if you're wanting to carry more than will fit in your shirt. I can fit enough food in my jersey to do a century easily enough. A couple cliff bars, an energy shot or two and a PB&J will keep me on the road far longer than I have water for. I also stick some fig newtons in the bag with the pb&j and maybe a little dried fruit for when my mouth gets yucky. If you're having to stop frequently to pee you're probably taking in more water than your body needs.
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Old 04-08-2011, 03:00 PM
edki edki is offline
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"extra weight of my u-lock "

I've found that the few pounds a lock weighs is easily compensated for by attaching it to my bike.

It's nice to be able to stop if I want without worrying too ...
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Old 04-10-2011, 11:15 AM
Alan Alan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boneshaker View Post
If you're having to stop frequently to pee you're probably taking in more water than your body needs.
Yes, but that depends on how often is "frequently" as well as individual body needs and physical conditions. I think lack of hydration is more often a problem than over hydration, though, especially as exercise periods get over an hour. A few quick pee stops and back to work on a long ride beats bonking, cramping, reduced muscle strength and mental fatigue. There are lots of articles about hydrating for endurance exercise, for example this one.
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Old 04-10-2011, 05:36 PM
boneshaker boneshaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan View Post
Yes, but that depends on how often is "frequently" as well as individual body needs and physical conditions. I think lack of hydration is more often a problem than over hydration, though, especially as exercise periods get over an hour. A few quick pee stops and back to work on a long ride beats bonking, cramping, reduced muscle strength and mental fatigue. There are lots of articles about hydrating for endurance exercise, for example this one.
I agree with you Alan. Certainly cyclists are more often dehydrated than hyper-hydrated, but if the poster has to stop frequently to pee they are probably not dehydrated. Bonking because of a lack of water is not fun.

As far as food is concerned, try some different things on ~50 ish mile rides. At that distance you probably don't NEED food to have enough energy, but you will certainly be able to feel how your body reacts to the calories. It's how I learned about fig bars which are great for me. If I'm in calorie debt bad enough I can feel them almost immediately. People react differently to different foods though so experiment around a bit. Organized rides are good for this because they will feed you at the stops. A word of warning... foods with a lot of fiber can turn out badly. Stay away from anything that takes your body effort to digest. Digestion takes blood and when your body is using the blood to power your muscles it doesn't need to fight with your stomach. A few years ago at the STP I saw some poor guy turning inside out because he ate a lot of pineapple and his body couldn't handle it. I'm sure it tasted great at the stops, but 200 mile days are not the place to introduce new foods.

Speaking of long rides, I missed a ride with friends out to Larch Mtn this weekend and I'm bummed about it. That's one of my favorite rides as well...
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Old 04-10-2011, 02:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boneshaker View Post
most cycling jersey's have pockets in the back. There are many companies that make little frame bags, bento boxes or trunks as well if you're wanting to carry more than will fit in your shirt. I can fit enough food in my jersey to do a century easily enough. A couple cliff bars, an energy shot or two and a PB&J will keep me on the road far longer than I have water for. I also stick some fig newtons in the bag with the pb&j and maybe a little dried fruit for when my mouth gets yucky. If you're having to stop frequently to pee you're probably taking in more water than your body needs.
I was thinking about getting a frame bag, but I wasn't sure why I wanted it. I think it would be a good lunch box.

Your food suggestions are great, ty.

Ty for all the input so far everyone. <3
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