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View Full Version : when is it OK not to stop?


Cecil M
02-07-2007, 09:12 PM
This is a question I have been asking myself. I am a daily commuter and I stop at all the stop lights and stop signs on my ride. except the stop sign before the traffic circle in ladds addition and those two other intersections controlled by stop signs where I turn right.
whether its legal or not is not my interest yet what are other commuters styles in navigating their urban commute?

rubbish heap
02-07-2007, 09:25 PM
If the coast is clear, I pedal through stop signs.

donnambr
02-07-2007, 11:43 PM
I don't stop when I'm riding on some street in outer East very early in the morning and this pack of men who look like they're meth heads are headed towards me walking in the street on my side. That's when I quickly become a wrong-way cyclist and blow the stop sign ahead. I cannot imagine any police officer in this city would have written a ticket when that happened to me. If someone had, I would have fought it tooth and nail.

pdxtex
02-08-2007, 03:25 AM
at least come to some semblance of a stop, not like the 3 second rule but you can pretty much come to a full stop and keep your momentum going. erring on the side of caution, id say always come to complete stop during the day, night time in quiet residential is different. at least get some lights!!!!

mike_khad1
02-08-2007, 07:25 AM
This is a question I have been asking myself. I am a daily commuter and I stop at all the stop lights and stop signs on my ride. except the stop sign before the traffic circle in ladds addition and those two other intersections controlled by stop signs where I turn right.
whether its legal or not is not my interest yet what are other commuters styles in navigating their urban commute?

Never Steal Someone's Right-of-Way. That's my rule. I don't know if it matters if a policeman see's me going through a red or stop sign but I slow to the point of stopping. If I see no one, I go. Otherwise I stop.

dennis
02-08-2007, 12:47 PM
Over the years I think I've learned the hard way. I make both my wheels stop in a track stand, look left, look right, look left again before proceeding, at all stop signs, no matter what, day or night. It really pisses the people who ride with me off, but hey, the hurts last longer now days and it is the right thing to do.

brock
02-08-2007, 02:40 PM
both my wheels stop in a track stand, look left, look right, look left again before proceeding, at all stop signs, no matter what, day or night.

Plus, it makes you stronger. It's hard to find places in inner Portland to 'train', the ol' sprint two blocks, stop, repeat is a great way to develop explosive power :)

jami
02-08-2007, 03:29 PM
i slow down enough to check both directions twice and to be able to stop in time if i missed something. i'm more cautious than pretty much every other biker under 40 i see, but you know, those bikers over 40 are over 40 for a reason.

fetishridr
02-08-2007, 10:36 PM
i slow to a 5mph roll seated, then stand and sprint two pedal strokes. from a distance, it looks like a stop for the the five O, but i dont slow at all. i dont run any lights though. but just remember, the new ghost cycle on stark is a result of rolling through.

jwdoom
02-08-2007, 11:03 PM
Never Steal Someone's Right-of-Way.

Can we make stickers and/or patches that say that?

nm973
02-08-2007, 11:15 PM
I really try to give cyclists a good name. When a car is around to see me, I do the right thing and make sure not to piss off any drivers, and act as curteous as possible. My theory is I hope they look better on cyclists and when they see you down the road, they will be courteous to you, and hopefully when they see you before me, you send me a happy driver, and I really appreciate it.

In lightly travelled rural streets, I will roll (not blow) a stop sign, which allows me to look all ways safely. I stop at all red lights and I do not jump them. If I see a cyclist (or biker) blow by me when I slow for a stop light/sign I will visibly shake my head at them if a car is visible. Hopefully the driver will see that not all cyclists cut them off, etc. I ride agressive when I have the right of way (read, I don't slow down just cause), when I do not have the right of way, I am cautous, and give the car the right of way. Of course in all situations, I know the car wins. Even if they kill me, I know that they will probably just get a $200 ticket for taking my life, so I keep that in mind. Sorry I will stop the rant on that part.

manfred8
02-14-2007, 09:07 AM
I normally stop when traffic is present, even if safe to go through a light or stop sign. But when I ride to work at 4:30 am, I rarely stop for red lights or stop signs if there is no traffic, I slow to make sure it's safe and go.

Tom

GelFreak
02-14-2007, 12:32 PM
i stop at all red lights. Side street stop signs are case by case. If no one including peds. are around that i can see I'll slow and roll through, but if people are around I at least come to an almost complete stop.

My thought process is this. Try to not decline the image of cyclist, and don't complain if you broke the law and got caught. Pay the fine. Simple as that in my mind.

LongRider#107
02-15-2007, 05:17 AM
Red lights. Stop signs, although a track stand or rolling stop is it if no one is approaching. I've learned that it is easier to clip out and put a foot on the ground if I do have to stop at a sign or four way intersection, because a track stand can make the car driver stop and you both get confused.

Most people do not understand the concept of right-of-way as written in the ODL manual. Driving/riding defensively is the overwhelming maxim, just in case you come upon that aggressive or oblivious auto operator/bike rider.

I NEVER ride with earphones, as I see many do. My ears tell me what my eyes can't see yet.

Matt P.
02-22-2007, 01:08 PM
I stop for all stop signs and lights except one - the stop sign at the railroad tracks where SE Umatilla meets the bottom of the Springwater Trail south of Oaks Park.

The reason is simple: FRA (Federal Railroad Administration) regulations require trains to sound the horn before crossing the road. On a bike I have no trouble hearing it.

Ok, so you might ask, what if they don't blow the horn? Well, those tracks belong to the Oregon Pacific Railroad, run by Dick Samuels. That portion of the railroad only has one engine in service at a time, runs a couple of times per week, and is run by one of two people, both of whom are very conscientious of their jobs. FRA regulations are VERY strict, and disobeying the horn law even once can cost you your license.

I'm much more likely to be hit by a car, collide with another cyclist, or a pedestrian, or get struck by lightning than to get hit by a train. So, I'll continue to take my life into my own hands on that one.

Note: I *do* slow down quite a bit, though - it's downhill, on a corner, and I have to cross the tracks at an angle and avoid a post turning into the Springwater Trail. I also have an eye out for joggers, who turn around at that spot. So I don't take it much faster than a walk. There's just no real reason to come to a full stop there, at any time of day or volume of traffic.

ADirtMonkey
03-09-2007, 05:15 PM
I usually Yield at stop signs, letting people have the right of way. Stoplights I treat like a stopsign. If it is super busy i just wait until it turns. If not I look both ways then roll through. I have gotten popped for running a red light, mainly 'cause I was smart with the officer.