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hydrogeek
01-12-2007, 09:19 AM
Thought I'd share my findings. I found a great combination of gloves that work for the cold weather. I have ridden this week in 25 to 35 degree weather and even in the snow the other day and my fingers were nice and warm. That is the first time ever! :cool:

My system is three layers. First layer is Thermasilk gloves (Campmor $6), second layer is Smart Wool (Campmor $16) and the top layer is Manzella Lobster Claw Windstopper shell (Nashbar $15 on sale). I have seen other brands of gloves with the Windstopper fabric also. Even though I wear three layers they fell less bulky than wearing a pair of ski/snowboard gloves.

Jonathan Maus
01-12-2007, 02:15 PM
thanks for sharing hyrdogeek, I've got a few gloves but none of them works well in this cold. I'll look into your layering suggestion. I've also heard all good things about Manzella from others.

cheers and stay warm.

monsieurcris
01-12-2007, 03:35 PM
I also found a good solution this year. Mine includes a polypropelene base glove (Andy and Bax's) under a pair of neoprene kayaking gloves from Next Adventure. Last year, no matter what I tried, my hands were always cold. This year, with this set up, Ive only recently had cold fingers in the AM. Today was the worst of the year, but still not as bad as a daily bonechill from last year. If they get wet the neoprene still stays warm, and they dry out super quick over a heater vent. The only downfall is that the inside of the neoprene has developed a definate funky aroma after many days of sweaty hands. I can see how this combo would be improved with a windstopper layer or even a wool mitten added in.

Oh- and the whole combo cost $18, a far cry from any winter glove I saw at a bike shop.

monsieurcris
01-12-2007, 03:36 PM
BTW- anyone know if it is ok to put neoprene in the washing machine? With soap?

hydrogeek
01-12-2007, 07:39 PM
I also tried the neoprene gloves. They worked well for me above 40 degrees. Below that they felt cold.

I would think that you could wash neoprene. It is pretty durable material. Maybe try to hand wash them the first time around.

lynnef
01-12-2007, 10:55 PM
I have successfully washed neoprene booties in the machine, and air dried them. I suspect you could wash your gloves.

colors, warm wash, cold rinse, extra rinse, fast spin (this is the cycling/sports clothing load)

My PI Amfibs did not keep my fingers warm this morning. Possibly if the ride had been longer than 20 minutes they would have warmed up. No problems on the ride home (Park Way hill, going up...).

Gloves for tomorrow's ride will be SmartWool liners, Gore Windstoppers, and, if that doesn't help, Mountain Hardwear Tempest SL over that.

vseven
01-13-2007, 08:05 AM
Pearl Izumi Inferno, part fingered glove, part lobster claw. They are not cheap ($65) but mine have lasted for years and get me through New England winters. No kidding. Above or at 40 degrees they are too warm though.

jwdoom
01-13-2007, 04:14 PM
I wear Airius gloves I bought at Seven Corners. I haven't worn them on a long ride in the cold yet but they've done me pretty well so far.

As long as they're warm when I put them on. I stick the fingers of whatever gloves I'm wearing under the waistband of my pants when I'm taking them off for more than a few seconds, or for at least a few minutes before I head out into the cold. Maybe I've just got ice cold paws but if I put cold hands into cold gloves they never warm up.

endform
01-15-2007, 08:21 PM
First layer is Thermasilk gloves (Campmor $6)

Is there anywhere in town that sells silk liners like this?

Buckwad
01-16-2007, 08:24 AM
I just saw a nice article in Bicycling magazine (Jan/Feb 2007) about gear for wet/dry and cold weather. A nice spread of ideas. They also recommend the Pearl Izumi Infero glove for cold/snowy temps.

http://www.bicycling.com/article/1,6610,s1-1-7-15361-1,00.html


Now if I could just figure out a tire pressure to keep from falling on my arse in the snow. :)

hydrogeek
01-16-2007, 05:52 PM
Is there anywhere in town that sells silk liners like this?

I did find some that were a different brand at GI Joe's. What I did not find locally are the Smart Wool gloves. That is why I ended up ordering them from Campmor.

pdxtex
02-08-2007, 05:14 AM
its all about andy and bax...they have a few bins of really nice and cheap work gloves....knit, neoprene, base layers, knit with grippy coatings.....

BillD
02-08-2007, 09:52 AM
Now that it's warmed up a bit, I thought I'd pass this on. I recently found a pair of gloves at Fred Meyers that has full fingers, a tough synthetic suede palm and a terrycloth patch on the thumb for "wiping sweat and debris". The palms are lightly padded and there is a strip of thin padding over the back of the knuckles. They are made of a breathable nylon knit material so they're not suitable for blocking out the cold east wind. I like them on days when it's not warm enough for fingerless gloves or cold enough for extra layers... they are just right for the weather we've had this week. The fingers are thin enough so that I can use keys and operate buttons on a cycle computer.

Here is a link (http://www.palmflex.com/Youngstown/mechanicplus.htm) to the gloves. Freddies has them for $12.00 in the auto parts section.

Donald
11-07-2007, 10:08 AM
Ressurecting this thread to see if anyone has the same problem I do:

Stinky gloves.

I've got some gloves made by Salsa that are some sort of neoprene/kevlar material.

Warm and toasty.

But my hands have been sweating in them and after a few weeks of cold weather riding, they've began to put up a bit of a stink.

I guess I may try tossing them in the wash, but I have a feeling even that may not work (you know how when a wash cloth goes sour, it's never the same?)

Anyone else have this problem?

_DA

mizake
11-07-2007, 10:53 AM
Ressurecting this thread to see if anyone has the same problem I do:

Stinky gloves.

I've got some gloves made by Salsa that are some sort of neoprene/kevlar material.

Warm and toasty.

But my hands have been sweating in them and after a few weeks of cold weather riding, they've began to put up a bit of a stink.

I guess I may try tossing them in the wash, but I have a feeling even that may not work (you know how when a wash cloth goes sour, it's never the same?)

Anyone else have this problem?

_DA

I've had luck just throwing my gloves in the wash and letting them hang-dry. This worked really well for a pair of gloves I'd worn for a couple of months and then soiled heavily during Horning's Hustle (heaps of mud caked on). They came out clean and smelling fresh :)

artizin
12-04-2007, 11:17 AM
I just picked up some Specialized Radiant winter gloves at the Bike Gallery normally $55 down to $32 on clearance... they're waterproof ( hipora shell ) and thinsulate lined. with some nice scotchlite details. Warm and toasty, I bought them yesterday and wore them home... Really warm.. almost too warm. It really wasn't the weather to wear them in yesterday... but when winter comes full swing I'll be ready.

lazlo
12-04-2007, 12:45 PM
Yes, you can wash neoprene; use a mild non-detergent soap. To get out the funk, soak in a white vinegar / water solution, maybe a cup of vinegar to a gallon of water. Let drip dry. The acid in the vinegar kills the bacteria in the neoprene. I wear neoprene socks on my feet when it's cold and or wet. If it's really cold I'll add a pair of thin socks underneath. As for gloves, I have some Novarra windstopper gloves that work fine for me. I've also added a thin polypro insert if it's below about 30.