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ocj
10-06-2006, 12:59 PM
I have a goal to ride (and complete!) Cycle Oregon next year, though I don't even own a bike right now. I can't spend a ton of money, but do want a good, entry-level road bike that will include bang-for-the-buck and will be suited for the ride/training. Any tips/advice would be great!

nishiki
10-06-2006, 02:47 PM
You probably want to start easy with a Huffy.
You can then move on to a Trek, hybrid MTB

I

TCR Punk
10-06-2006, 03:41 PM
Cycle Oregon on a Huffy? WTF!

geoff
10-06-2006, 04:19 PM
I picked up a really nice tirreno razza 3.0 from performance bike for $720. It's their own brand, but I've heard the frame is made by fuji. It is has a lightweight aluminum frame with carbon seat stays. Carbon fork and seat post. The entire drivetrain is race ready Shimano 105. It comes with a decent wheelset and tires. The brakes and crankset work fine, but are no names. Performance also offers free lifetime adjustments.

It's regularly a $1200 bike, but it was on sale in store for $900, then I got them to price match their web only coupon for another 20% off. Plus, if you buy their $20 membership, you get 10% back that you can use the next day to buy accessories. They are offering a one day only 20% off coupon today, but they seem to come up often.

My overall impression for the first month and about 300 miles is that I'm extremely pleased for the cost.

BTW, now is a good time to buy a bike. All the shops are trying to clearance their 2006 models because the 2007s should be here anytime.

tao
10-06-2006, 06:10 PM
ocj,

Checkout www.cyclingsite.com and CycleOregon group on groups.yahoo.com. You need to open an account and sign up with the cycleoregon Yahoo group. It is a group of people with lot of hospitalities, wisdom, and experiences about cycleoregon and cycling in general. I guarantee it will be worthwhile.

Good luck on your goal and enjoy the trip

GelFreak
10-08-2006, 09:07 PM
The specialized Allez is a great entry level road bike. Its about $700, and it's road ready. Although, it could use clipless pedals, but you can upgrade as you progress. I've used it for a commuter for apx 6 months now and its been problem free, given normal maintance.

BillD
10-09-2006, 12:35 AM
I have a goal to ride (and complete!) Cycle Oregon next year, though I don't even own a bike right now. I can't spend a ton of money, but do want a good, entry-level road bike that will include bang-for-the-buck and will be suited for the ride/training. Any tips/advice would be great!

First, decide how much you can spend. Have a figure written down before you go shopping. Trying to go over your estimated total household budget while shopping is a lost cause.

For a new bike worthy surviving of a lot of training miles, commuting, a couple of centuries and CycleOregon itself, I would try for a budget of $800.00 to $1200.00. Yeah, that's a lot of money but you want to buy the right bike the first time. Your chances of doing that go down if your budget is too low.

When you have that figure nailed down.... and know where the money will come from, add $200.00 for incidentals not included with the bike. This may seem high but things like saddles racks, lights and so forth will eat up $200.00 in a hurry.

Armed with your iron-clad budget figure, go to several good local shops, explain what you have to spend and what you want to ride. The various Bike Galleries, REI, River City, Sellwood, Bike'n'Hike, Kesslers, Weirs and Performance should have what you want... if not, look further... as was mentioned before, this time of year will have hungry salesfolk ready to pounce. Turn your personal BS alarm up to 11 and have the salesfolk show you, and let you ride, a variety of bikes in your price range. If the BS alarm goes off, don't argue, just leave.... you can always come back. They won't really be mad and they do want your money.

Since you have no personal history of knowing what brand you want, stick with well known and established labels such as Specialized, Giant, Trek, Gunnar, Surly, and on and on. Your chances of getting "the right bike" are better with a major, well known brand with a reputation to protect.

Set aside some time to shop. Don't rush. Mid week during the middle of the day will have smaller crowds in the stores. Above all, keep this in mind:

1, Cheap
2, Light
3, Strong

Pick any two.

Bill

Haven_kd7yct
10-09-2006, 11:16 AM
Lots of good advice on this forum....

I bought my new bike from Performance. I rode a couple of different ones at different places before trying the one I actually bought.

It's a flat-bar road bike, and it's a Schwinn. Yeah, that's like saying "it's a Huffy!" (my very first bike, in college, was a Huffy MTB; my sister-in-law has it now), but hear me out!

It's comfortable for me; that's the most important thing. It was $650, which was actually less than I was expecting to pay for a bike.

I've ridden it 625 miles since May 29 2006. And I'm looking forward to more commuting and my first century next year on that bike.

sunningotter
10-14-2006, 09:24 PM
If the prices for a new bike are too high, try shopping at one of the used shops (Sellwood comes to mind, as does Community Cycling Center)... They have some nice stuff to get you going. I'm partial to Treks myself...

vseven
10-16-2006, 01:11 PM
whatever the bike........triple chain rings !