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rainperimeter
09-27-2006, 12:07 PM
hey y'all. i'm wondering if any of you have weekend ride/camping trips you're fond of. ride out saturday, camp, come home sunday. that sort of thing. my girlfriend and i always have the weekends off and think this would be a very appropriate use of our time off.

north, south, east, west, it makes no matter...

Jonathan Maus
09-27-2006, 12:43 PM
there a ton of great options....I happened to write an article about this in the Willy Week a while back. Here's the article:

http://www.wweek.com/editorial/3133/6436

have a great trip..

jeff
09-29-2006, 08:51 AM
RainPer, my fave of Jonathan's list of short tours is the trip up to the Nestucca River campgrounds --- should be pretty quiet this time of year, other than the elk/deer hunters. Here's a fairly quiet & scenic route for getting there, from the end of the MAX line in Hillsboro:

http://www.portlandonline.com/transportation/index.cfm?c=39889

a pretty good climb up to the crest, but worth it.

BillD
09-29-2006, 11:27 AM
I made this map and profile of a route from my place in Scappoose to Astoria. It follows essentially the same route described in Jonathan's article and in the PortlandOnline link. The profile gives an idea of the hardest climbs. The first peak is near Scaponia County Park, between Cater rd. and Hwy 47 on Scappoose-Vernonia road. The second large peak on the graph is Saddle Mountain, just past the Jewell Wildlife Refuge. In between these two peaks, the road follows along the Nehalem River over some rolling hills. The road is in pretty good shape except for some rough spots on the two steepest climbs. Mostly, there are no shoulders but traffic is not heavy, at least it wasn't when I drove it the day before yesterday. There will be some log trucks during the week and motorhomes on weekends. There are two small bridges under construction near Mist. There is one-way traffic with flaggers at these but it doesn't take long to get through. This is the only construction for the entire 80 miles.

Enjoy your trip,
Bill

http://www.pbase.com/billd9/image/67719870.jpg

rainperimeter
09-30-2006, 01:42 AM
oh geez. all that is so great! thanks a bunch. keep it coming...

the Wumpus
07-10-2007, 09:06 PM
Arise, deceased thread! I command you to liiiiiiiiiiive!!!

Er... bump?

'Tis the season, and I'm looking for some overnighter bikey destinations for the weekends. There are some good ones already here, but there must be more! Keep 'em coming! Maybe not your favorite getaway spot, because then it might get overwhelmed with thousands of rowdy cyclist troublemakers. Hey, it could happen, you never know.

Haven_kd7yct
07-11-2007, 09:17 AM
Wumpus! That was great!

Me too with the bump...

A question for y'all: I'm concerned about doing a ride like this with the traffic. If at all possible, please let us know where/how much/condition of shoulder and traffic/speed limits/etc.

I've heard Nestucca River Road is great for biking, but I don't like it when cars pass me too close. What's the speed limit for cars on that road?

cyclotouriste
07-11-2007, 10:03 AM
Short bike camping trips, close enough for a 2-3 day excursion:

Oxbow (Sandy River)
Champoeg (Willamette Valley)
Stub Stewart (near Vernonia)
Ainsworth (end of the scenic highway)
Beacon Rock (Washington side)
Wind River campgrounds (Paradise Creek, Beaver)
McIver Park (near Estacada)
Clackamas River (many options, but I like Roaring River and Lockaby, and a 3 day trip or a really strong first day will get you to Bagby or Timothy Lake)
Green Canyon (on Mt. Hood near Welches; take the Old Barlow Road instead of 26)
Gales Creek Campground on Highway 6

I also know of the following local parks with campgrounds: Barton Park, Vernonia City Park, Big Eddy (on the Nehalem), a county park near the summit of Apiary Road, and another above Rainier.

I have routes to many of these on my blog. There's an index by destination (Mt. Hood, the coast, etc.) on the right sidebar.

escapevelocipede.blogspot.com

SpeedRacer
07-11-2007, 09:57 PM
Arise, deceased thread! I command you to liiiiiiiiiiive!!!

Er... bump?

'Tis the season, and I'm looking for some overnighter bikey destinations for the weekends. There are some good ones already here, but there must be more! Keep 'em coming! Maybe not your favorite getaway spot, because then it might get overwhelmed with thousands of rowdy cyclist troublemakers. Hey, it could happen, you never know.

Well let's pick one and see if at least a dozen or so bikeportland readers show up!

nelson_fisher
07-12-2007, 02:36 PM
Don't forget the newest State Park in Oregon, about 40 miles from Portland.

LL Stubb Stewart State Park
http://www.oregonstateparks.org/park_255.php

It just opened recently (like in the past couple of weeks) and is located near Banks. The web site above has a map showing its location. It is off Highway 26, but there are tons of small country roads that lead in that direction. The state parks web site links to Google Maps for directions, and you can use the new feature of dragging the direction line to create new routes. I was able to find a quick route that avoided Hwy 26.

Anyway, this is a brand new park, and it isn't too far from Portland.

bikieboy
07-12-2007, 09:29 PM
Nelson, do you happen to know if the Stub features hiker/biker campsites like many of the coastal state parks? the website says there are "walk-in" and "primitive" camp sites, but the great thing about the hiker/biker sites is you CAN'T drive up & walk in - thus there's always room for a cyclist, even on a Saturday nite in August.

I guess i could as State Parks, but you sound like you might know..?

sign me,

wanting to be sure i have a campsite after a lomg ride.

the Wumpus
07-13-2007, 11:26 AM
Well let's pick one and see if at least a dozen or so bikeportland readers show up!

Random thought: The weekend of August 12th would be an excellent camping weekend, with the meteor shower....

the Wumpus
07-13-2007, 10:14 PM
Okay, more info:

The Perseids meteor shower: http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/11jul_greatperseids.htm

The show will peak the night of Sunday, August 12th. This year, the new moon falls on August 12th, perfect timing! So the only major light in the sky competing with the meteors will be the light pollution from the city. Which sounds like a great reason to ride a bike a long way away from the city where it'll be good and dark and stay up late staring at the sky.

I'm definitely planning on heading out for this one! Not sure where yet, but... A long ride in practically any direction would do the trick as far as reducing light pollution. Anyone interested in some sort of a group ride?

pdxtex
07-14-2007, 01:52 AM
so how do you guys transport your gear then? panniers? a trailer? on your back?!!! i could get away with a few cliff bars, bed roll and blanket, but have yet to consider the logistics of toting lots of gear. suggestions? on the lighter side, my recent trip down the springwater revealed more then 3 groups of resourceful bike transients that apparently had their own "campsites" along johnson creek.

rainperimeter
07-16-2007, 01:35 AM
panniers and a bungee for a couple things on top of your rack.

JessicaRoberts
08-12-2007, 09:02 PM
This weekend 4 of us went out to McIver state park. It was only a 25 - 30 mile ride from southeast Portland. I just tried to draw a google map but it was driving me nuts, so I'll have to just describe the route. We took the 40's bikeway south, did a dogleg on Steele to continue south on 46th, left on Ogden, and then south on 52nd until SE Flavel Drive (just south of Flavel, goes southeast at a wonky angle). Took Flavel Drive until it turns south and becomes Linwood, and took that south a ways. Right on Harmony, which becomes Sunnyside (and has some sketchy bits by the mall and the I-205 onramps). R on SE 132nd until the intersection with Clackamas Hwy/212/224. East on that for a bit, then south on 224 when they split. Take this until the Carver boat ramp, where you cross the Clackamas River, then left on S Springwater Rd. This road has no shoulder, and cars go really fast, but it seemed fairly low-volume, and very scenic. Now just take this for another 10-ish miles until you reach Milo McIver State Park (http://www.oregonstateparks.org/park_142.php) on your left.

There's one hiker/biker campsite that's pretty nice, and set apart from the shrieking children and RVs. It has a firepit and you can buy firewood there. You can't reserve it, but the camp host told me that hikers/bikers have only come 3 times over the last year, so I think it's a pretty good bet.

If you did get there and all the campsites were taken, I would recommend biking to Estacada (4 miles away, not sure of the route) and then taking TriMet back (Line 31 (http://trimet.org/schedules/r031.htm)).

There's a sweet cafe at Sunnyside and 132nd called The Old Mill Cafe and Bakery. It's in a converted historical mill building, and they have good bike parking in the back. Standard brunch/sandwich stuff, prepared pretty well. Great tater tots too!

jr98664
03-19-2009, 10:24 PM
I've got spring break coming up, (March 28th through April 5th—don't worry, I'll be back for the CRC rally) and I would love to get out on the road and try my hand at a bit of touring and camping by bike.

At the moment, I'm looking at three possible routes in general:
Willamette Valley to Eugene and back [Too many routes to name]
Columbia River Gorge (to Biggs/Maryhill and back) [~210 mi]
Lower Columbia/Northern Pacific Coast (Longview–Astoria–Tillamook) [~195 mi min. (w/ bus to/from Longview and Sherwood)]

At the moment, I would put them in that order of preference and I'm leaning towards the trip to Eugene, as I've got family down there.

Does anyone have good experience riding and camping along these routes that would like to share their experiences? The last two are kind of specific enough to lend themselves to specific campgrounds, but I'm not so sure about ones in the Willamette Valley.

Now there's the camping itself. I've got a single-person tent, sleeping bag (20° C) with mat, along with a camp stove. I wouldn't leave home without bike repair tools too. As a first-time bike camper, are there any more seasoned riders with a bit of advice as to what I need to bring on my ride?

K'Tesh
03-19-2009, 10:32 PM
Both good weather and bad weather...

Sunscreen, sunglasses, a SPF chapstick

Lightweight Poncho (or large plastic bag), clothing to keep you warm after you stop riding. Fire starting tech, not just matches.

Have fun!
K'Tesh

bikieboy
03-20-2009, 04:23 PM
JR, good plan! There's a dearth of WV campgrounds, at least in the central valley. One idea (not saying it's a good 'un) is to discretely bivouac at the Willamette Mission State Park by the Wheatland Ferry, north of Salem about 15 miles or so. It's a sprawling park, so who would be the wiser? you may want to check to make sure it's open for the season, so the restrooms are operable.

From there, its about 90 miles (depending on route) to Eugene - very nice ride, through Salem & the Ankeny wildlife refuge , over the Buena Vista ferry & rolling down the east side of the river (Peoria Rd) to Junction City. --- consult the bike maps for Salem/Linn co., and the one for Albany/mid-Willamette Valley (if you can lay your hands on one) - both good maps.

& report back!

the Wumpus
03-22-2009, 06:15 PM
Now there's the camping itself. I've got a single-person tent, sleeping bag (20° C) with mat, along with a camp stove. I wouldn't leave home without bike repair tools too. As a first-time bike camper, are there any more seasoned riders with a bit of advice as to what I need to bring on my ride?

The cyclewild checklist is a good start:
http://www.cyclewild.org/articles/bikecamparticles/2-minimum-gear-list.html
Any checklist at all is good for packing. For me personally: One or two changes of clothes is plenty: I'll do a little laundry in the shower if I'm on the road long enough to need it. I tend to pack simple foods. Cous-cous is super easy, just boil water, throw some cous-cous in with some salt or whatever else, and you've got a hot meal. (find it cheap in Winco's bulk section) A couple of things to snack on to get going, there's plenty of snacks available on the road. A few more straps or bungees than you think you need.

But mostly, plenty of time! That's been one of my biggest mistakes; not giving myself more time than necessary. I learned my lesson riding around the coast last year. I would have enjoyed the trip more if I'd been able to have a little touristy time. The worst that'll happen is that you'll get where you're going early.

jr98664
03-22-2009, 07:08 PM
At the moment, I have a nice, scenic route mapped out to Champoeg State Park (just south of Newberg). With a few scenic detours, it comes out to about 60 miles. They also have Hiker/Biker spots available for only $4.

From there, I've got a nice route planned out along the east bank of the Willamette all of the way to at least Salem, with a lunch stop at Willamette Mission State Park.

I also have a nice route planned from about Albany or Corvallis all of the way to Eugene via Riverside, Peoria, and Coburg.

Unfortunately, I'm having a bit of a problem finding a decent campground anywhere between Salem and Albany, which is where I'll be for my second night. Now, there are a few RV Parks in either city, but I doubt those would be all that pleasant to be camping in with only a tent and bicycle. Those places also tend to be a bit more expensive than I would like to be paying for a piece of suburban asphalt. Through a couple of searches, I've come upon the Oregon Christian Convention Conference Center (http://www.oregonchristianconvention.org/). Their website says that they have tent sites for $17 a night. Unfortunately, it looks like these may only be available for groups, so I'll be sure to call and ask ahead of time.

Unfortunately, it should also be mentioned that the Buena Vista ferry is closed until April 15th. However, this means that traffic on the east side of the ferry landing would probably be close to non-existent. As such, it might mean that it wouldn't be that hard to stealth camp somewhere near the east side of the river. Distance-wise, it would also be about the perfect spot to camp between Champoeg and Eugene.

As for gear, I think I'm set. I've even made some custom racks just to hold things like my tent and poles. The only gear I'm still thinking about are my only electronics: my camera and lights, which I all run off of rechargeable batteries. In total, a minimum of 4 AAs are needed for the camera, and 2 AAs for the front light. My two tail lights require a total of 4 AAAs between them. I've also got a small charger for all of my batteries. By keeping my lights off during most of the day, I think I would be fine only bringing my four AAAs, also knowing that I essentially have a backup taillight if anything were to happen with one. In addition to my two sets of 4 AAs for my camera and 2 AAs for my bike light, I think I better play it safe and bring at least 4 spares. I should be able to recharge everything in Eugene if needed.

As for food, I too was planning to go the couscous route. It's as easy as boiling water. I would also start with at least a box of Clif Bars, and while those should last me most of the ride, they could easily be found in some of the larger cities. Any other quick and easy recipe ideas?

This would also seem like an easy question to answer, but I've never found one: In absence of a sign post or something similar, what do I do with my bike at night? I wouldn't want this to happen:
http://www.yehudamoon.com/index.php?date=2008-10-27

K'Tesh
03-22-2009, 09:54 PM
This would also seem like an easy question to answer, but I've never found one: In absence of a sign post or something similar, what do I do with my bike at night? I wouldn't want this to happen:
http://www.yehudamoon.com/index.php?date=2008-10-27

What? You don't sleep with your ride? ;)

If I were camping by bike (presuming I can carry my CPAP, and plug it in), my bike would find itself inside the tent with me (I have a 6 man tent), or under the vestibule/tarp I carry with me.

Simple Nature
03-22-2009, 10:13 PM
This pic came back to mind when reading your post:

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y155/dremorius20/Bicycle_20vs_20Girlfriend.jpg

K'Tesh
03-22-2009, 10:19 PM
This pic came back to mind when reading your post:

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y155/dremorius20/Bicycle_20vs_20Girlfriend.jpg

Of course you know that the relationship with the girlfriend didn't last nearly as long as the one with the bike ;)

Rubberside Down!
K'Tesh

the Wumpus
03-23-2009, 05:44 PM
This is the one time I'll use a cable lock. I've got one of those 6 footers that'll tie a bike up to nearly anything, and it can loop through bags and other stuff too for quick dashes inside a store. The hiker/biker sites I've used generally seem to have picnic tables or some such structure good for tying up to.
Also, I generally try to start looking for restaurant meal stops early, and find some place with outdoor seating. Thataway I can cable the bike to something next to where I'll be sitting, or sometimes even wheel it right up next to me. Keeps the separation anxiety away.

Some of the other camp foods I've liked also tend to be of the boiling water variety. Instant refried beans, scooped up with nacho flavor chips, make some darn fine bike fuel. Oatmeal's easy. The instant stuff's fine, but I like to get the stone ground kind and throw in whatever's handy. If you want to do some serious cooking, a small wide mouth thermos will slow-cook all sorts of stuff. I haven't done that on tour, but probably will give it a shot sometime.

bikerinNE
03-26-2009, 10:24 PM
As for food, I too was planning to go the couscous route. It's as easy as boiling water. I would also start with at least a box of Clif Bars, and while those should last me most of the ride, they could easily be found in some of the larger cities. Any other quick and easy recipe ideas?

Found this on on CGOAB, i just tested it out, not to bad, and they keep very well. I'm going to take a couple of batches on my extended tour down the coast and southwest. Losing a job isn't always a bad thing, it allows for things such as bike touring.

Homemade Energy Bar

3 cups of oatmeal
3/4 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup butter
2 eggs
2 tsp baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons molasses
raisins
Almond sliver.

Any combination of dried fruit and nuts will do equally well

Mix well and compress into a greased, rectangular baking pan, or iron skillet and place into a preheated oven for 25 minutes at 375 degrees.

jr98664
03-29-2009, 10:07 AM
Well, I'm off on my weeklong trip to Eugene and back. The weather on my longest day down there, Monday, is looking to be just about perfect. :cool: Thanks for all of your suggestions!

bikerinNE
04-04-2009, 11:42 AM
Well, I'm off on my weeklong trip to Eugene and back. The weather on my longest day down there, Monday, is looking to be just about perfect. :cool: Thanks for all of your suggestions!

Are you back yet? How'd it go?