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wsbob
03-12-2011, 09:26 PM
Seeing them displayed at Performance Bike just now, I couldn't help posting a notice for these Pearl Izumi ladies road shoes. Sure, PI isn't a great quality shoe, but for $9.99...89 percent off reg retail, if I was a gal on a budget that fit into a, sz 36 or 37, I'd be seriously considering these.

http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/products/medium/20-5008-BLS-ANGLE.jpg

wsbob
04-06-2011, 12:15 AM
If you're considering a folding bike, this could be a deal for you:

Performance Bike's April 6th 'Deal of the Day', is the 2008 Dahon Curve D3 3-Speed Folding Bike. 2008 Dahon Curve D3 3-Speed Folding Bike at Performance Bike online (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?mpe_id=12754&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&partNumber=30-0873&storeId=10052&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODWED-_-08DahonD3FoldingBike)

Is pink your color? That's all they got. Kind of a cool looking folding bike. Too late for me to dig up a pic I can use.

Simple Nature
04-06-2011, 10:55 AM
If you're considering a folding bike, this could be a deal for you:

Performance Bike's April 6th 'Deal of the Day', is the 2008 Dahon Curve D3 3-Speed Folding Bike. 2008 Dahon Curve D3 3-Speed Folding Bike at Performance Bike online (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?mpe_id=12754&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&partNumber=30-0873&storeId=10052&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODWED-_-08DahonD3FoldingBike)

Is pink your color? That's all they got. Kind of a cool looking folding bike. Too late for me to dig up a pic I can use.

That's a heck of a deal. Pink, huh.

wsbob
04-14-2011, 11:04 PM
So honestly...how many patches do you have on your tubes from repeated flats over the winter onslaught of road crew applications of fine gravel during snow and ice? I know that not everyone's running Schwalbe's, tuffies, and so on.

Always nice to stock up on new tubes when they're cheap. Tomorrow, the 15th of April is your chance at Performance bike:


http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/web/Performance%20Homepage/11PBS_04_April_15.gif

$1.99 tubes at Performance Bicycle (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?mpe_id=12754&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&partNumber=44-6005&storeId=10052&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODWKEND-_-FortePVTube700019-26)


The website wants you to order online, but if there's a store nearby, they'll honor the online price. That's what I did last time they were on sale. Note: 1:30pm: forum member 'dmc' just brought to my attention that the link I posted fot the Daily Deal doesn't go right to the page for the tubes on the website. I just substituted that one for the correct link. Actually though, the Daily Deal is always in its own little box to the left of the screen, on every page.

dmc
04-14-2011, 11:21 PM
wow

~~~~
1736 Southwest Alder Street, Portland, OR
(503) 224-0297
~~~~
Mall 205, 9988 Southeast Washington Street, Portland, OR
(503) 408-8150
~~~~
17942 McEwan Road, Portland, OR
(503) 639-2522 ‎
~~~~
3850 SW Hall Blvd., Beaverton, OR
(503) 644-3246
~~~~
7071 SW Nyberg Street, Tualatin, OR
(503) 639-2522
~~~~
or this for a map of Performance Bicycle locations in the Portland area: http://maps.google.com/maps?um=1&ie=UTF-8&q=performance+bike+portland&fb=1&gl=us&hq=performance+bike&hnear=Portland,+OR&ei=cvCnTdCDLpKCsQPt6-j5DA&sa=X&oi=local_group&ct=image&resnum=2&ved=0CAQQtgMwAQ
~~~~

I hope they have ample stock. Im gonna go buy at least 5 tomorrow (edit: Today. Time of post 12:20am). Rain or shine.

wsbob
04-15-2011, 11:58 AM
I'm just kind of giving this thread a bump in the event that may help other bikeforum browsers catch on this deal.

dmc ....glad if the notice helps you save a few bucks! 5 tubes, $2 savings each, is $10 that'll be nice to have available to put towards something else! ( And thanks for posting those store addresses for people's convenience.).

If you go to the Beaverton store, I can vouch that the employees are good, friendly people, such as Will. By the way, he's vice-chair of the Beaverton Bike Advisory Committee. So, while there, if any questions occurred to you about what the committee is doing, you might ask and see if he has a moment to answer them for you.

wsbob
04-28-2011, 12:39 AM
Whoo-hoo! Performance Bicycle online, again has the Dahon Curve D3 3-Speed Folding Bike on sale for the 'Deal of the Day':


Dahon Curve D3 3-Speed Folding Bike April 28 at Performance Bicycle (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?mpe_id=12754&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&partNumber=30-0873&storeId=10052&utm_source=website&utm_medium=homepage&utm_content=dod&utm_campaign=08dahonfoldingbike&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODTHURS-_-08dahonfoldingbike)


http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/web/Performance%20Homepage/11PBS_04_April_28.gif


Site says 'low inventory', but any color you want...as long as it's PINK.

For those of you that have been reading maus's stories of this week and comments to them on the main page, about Trimet's dithering over how best to accommodate transit riders that use a bike for part of their commute, if you're one of the transit agency's customers that fall into that category, this may be the answer for you.

lynnef
04-28-2011, 10:24 AM
I like PINK. The 3-speeds are what is the showstopper. :-) My house to MAX - either stop - includes a Hill. Good for the east side, though.

wsbob
04-28-2011, 11:09 AM
There's only three customer reviews on page the link takes you to, but they're informative. One spec about the bike to consider is the 16" wheels. One review remarks that the ride is rough. They attribute that to the small wheels (Dahon and other folders make bikes with larger wheels, like 20").

Still, the bike could probably be very good for some people needing only to travel a mile or two from the train or bus to home/work, or for generally goofing around, such as a ride around the waterfront and the eastside esplanade. And the bike ls very hot!! ( I know-w-w you like pink !)

I'd love to try one out for some short runs in my area. It actually would probably be very good for points within Central Beaverton. So just consider: A person living in Portland, has business in Central Beaverton. They're willing..actually would like to bike around Beaverton to tend to their business, but they don't want to mess with wrangling a full size bike on the MAX, trusting luck that they'll snag one of the sparse few bike specific spots on the train, or having to stick they're precious bike out on the front of a bus...and having to watch closely so some yahoo doesn't steal it off the front of the bus.

This little mini-folding bike could be just the ticket.

wsbob
05-02-2011, 10:21 AM
It's kind of u-u-ugly, IMO, but if you really dig on carbon, this carbon fiber water bottle cage on Performance Bicycle's 'Deal of the Day' may be for you (in case you're wondering why I'm posting deals for this online store rather than some others...that also have deals...it's because this one has stores in Portland and Beaverton, so you can go to the store, get the deal and beat the postage.).


http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/products/medium/20-4788-CAR-ANGLE.jpg

Forté Zeta Carbon Cage Compare: $79.99
Our Price: $39.99
SALE: $14.99
(Save $65.00) (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?mpe_id=12754&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&partNumber=20-4788&storeId=10052&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODMON-_-fortezetacage)


Check out that markdown! It's kind of weird, dramatically steep drop, and tells a bit about product marketing. Go into the store itself; the price on the item may be different than any of those listed in the link above. Why? I'm not sure. Is this actually a really good deal for a carbon fiber bottle cage like this? I'm not sure about that either. I'm happy with what I've got, which is one of those aluminum cages made by Taxc, popular with racers some years back.

Performance Bicycle also has other carbon fiber water bottle cages available, also on sale but not as good a deal as this. What the deal is though, about carbon fiber cages...I'm not sure. Maybe it's 'the look'. It probably isn't weight, because the cage above is 29 grams, compared to a very reasonably priced, $13.00 traditional styled stainless steal cage for 45 grams. Sounds like a big weight difference, but the fact is, that's only a half-ounce difference.

wsbob
05-23-2011, 02:54 PM
Of late, I've been kind of lax about posting good deals from Performance Bicycle. Maybe I shouldn't have. Last Thursday or so, for Deal of the Day, there was a nice mountain bike tire $36 regular, on sale for $15.

Should of got this posted earlier, but not knowing much about mountain bikes, or much whether this is a good deal or not, I didn't. But since one of the forum members recently was in a crash and is looking for a new bike, maybe a 29'er, this could be timely. Here's the Deal of the Day for Monday, which is already well away as I'm writing this:


http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/web/Performance%20Homepage/11PBS_05_May_23.gif

Deal of the Day 37 percent off on Access 29er bikes (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?catalogId=10551&categoryId=1608017&langId=-1&storeId=10052&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODMON-_-39OffAccess29er)

Quite a price range, starting from a low 'on sale' (don't think this includes DOD reduction.) of $629.99 (aluminum frame) on up to $3,464.99 (carbon fiber). I just clicked on one of about eight available that looked interesting:


http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/products/medium/30-4454-CAR-SIDE.JPG
2011 Access Stealth 4.0 29er Mountain Bike $1574.99 (http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/products/medium/30-4454-CAR-SIDE.JPG)


They're cool looking bikes.

wsbob
06-17-2011, 12:03 AM
I know little about cranksets, but Performance Bicycle's 'Deal of the Day', is what looks to be a nice crankset for 30 percent of retail...."Our Price: $279.99...SALE: $79.99...(Save $200.00)":


http://www.performancebike.com/images/performance/products/medium/50-7281-NCL-TOP.jpg


Shimano 105 10 FC-5600 50/39T Crankset (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?mpe_id=12754&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&partNumber=50-7281&storeId=10052&cm_re=Homepage-_-DODWKEND-_-ShimanoCrank)

Dovestrobe
06-28-2011, 01:13 PM
170
Hi guys!

A reflective tape (yellow bright) that is available at dollar tree (on Beaverton Hillsdale), ten reflective tapes for a dollar! At first it adhered quite flimsily to my day pack, but after a few hours was difficult to remove. Survived today's rain! Also comes in happy faces and hands, if you're interested in that sort of thing :D:D

I also placed reflective material on my velcro straps to my gloves which I use as a hand signal at night by twisting my wrist while signaling. An old fashioned blinker system.

Dovestrobe
07-01-2011, 11:38 AM
I just purchased 2 new blinky lights at LIGHT IN THE BOX for the summer, in case I get caught in the dark or deep gray in late afternoon (omg portland yeah!)

http://www.lightinthebox.com/Bicycle-Rear-Led-Light--3-AAA-_p76601.html

Inexpensive and FREE shipping (oh yeah!)

I'm thinking of placing one of these on my lower leg (old school style) with a strap to enhance the light effect.


***And on my wish list when my income hits a spike:

http://www.durawear.com/index.cfm/a/catalog.prodShow/vid/4355/catid/208

This surely beats cyclecentric pricing!

Dovestrobe
07-03-2011, 04:31 PM
http://www.gmc-denaliroadbike.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/GMCDelaniRoadBike.jpg
Made by Kent bike company. GMC Denali

$159.00 at walmart (50.8 et 57cm frame)... 63cm (more expensive @ $179.00) , shipping included. Yet it is well built and has rave reviews on amazon and YouTube!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKf7YDIGUvU

I am tempted to purchase this 28 pounder for cruising when off my tank mountain bike steed.


Specifications:
Frame: Aluminum 7005 straight gauge
Handlebar: Maesbend W: 430mm D:22.0mm
Gearing: 21-speed
Shifters: Shimano Revo SIS L2/R7
Front Derailleur: Shimano FD-TZ 31 Index
Rear Derailleur: Shimano RD-TZ30GS 7SPD
Saddle: Cionlli Black
Seat post: HL Aluminum Micro Adjust 27.2 x 300 mm
Brakes: Promax 501A Alloy Caliper Brake
Brake levers: Promax BL-250AP Aluminum
Tires: Kenda Black With Grey Band 700X28C
Rims: Vitesse Alloy black 700CX14GX36H
Pedals: VP-990S plastic body with steel cage
Fork: GMC Series 7000 steel
Chain: KMC Z 51
Crankset: Prowheel Alloy 335P6 28X38X48 170mm
Stem: Aluminum black EXT:100mm 0D.
Alloy calipers and ally brake levers
High-profile alloy Vitesse racing rims
Dimensions: 68"L x 18"W x 40"H
Assembly required
Warranty: lifetime frame, 1-year parts


I'd be tempted to change out the pedals, change the tires, put better tire (spoke) tape in the wheels, remove the plastic guards and kick stand. And make sure the bottom bracket is good and tight prior to riding.

dmc
07-03-2011, 05:19 PM
Great deal.

1.) Replace tires.
2.) Overhaul BB.

wsbob
07-04-2011, 01:15 AM
Dovestrobe...nice tip. I won't search for and post the link, but a couple years or so back, over at bikeforums, someone bought one of these wallyworld deals, reviewed and road tested the bike over a year or so, with periodic thread updates. That person couldn't resist upgrading the bike with some fairly serious, superior stuff, but basically, the opinion was the bike would have help up just fine, just about how it was sold as packaged.

Shimano mountain spd 520's (work just fine for many people's road bike needs.) are often on sale for around $36. Someone had a nice pair on craigslist tonight for $20. Why not just ride those Kenda tires? So, assuming no big screwups on assembly, a usable road bike for around $200. .

Shifters are Shimano Revo. Twist grip shifting. Stem may be aluminum, but it looks kind of like chrome steel in the pics. Seat tube has that weird cutaway down near the bottom bracket. Wonder why the designers did that. Maybe it's some common thing that's been used for awhile that I'm not aware of. No quick release wheels.

Dovestrobe
07-04-2011, 06:28 AM
Seat tube has that weird cutaway down near the bottom bracket. Wonder why the designers did that. Maybe it's some common thing that's been used for awhile that I'm not aware of. No quick release wheels.

The quick release is ideal for racers and people who'd rather not bring along a wrench. I for one pack a wrench to do my care on the road. I read somewhere a person complaining about the weight of the device used to cinch down down the seat with allen bolts, perhaps it weighs a pound or two!? Looks like a lead weight. Anyway, these attributes are nice anti theft devices, no? The cutaway on the frame is something I've heard no one complain about. Perhaps this was done to allow for precise placement of the front derailleur?! Aerodynamic? Your guess is as good as mine!

Simple Nature
07-04-2011, 10:23 AM
I don't think that's a cut-away... I think the downtube is a blade for aerodynamics but the tube has to be round at the derailleur... silly since they have braze-on derailleurs now. Then again, the lever is on the backside, so the "cut away" might be clearance for the derailleur lever.

wsbob
07-04-2011, 11:09 AM
The quick release is ideal for racers and people who'd rather not bring along a wrench. I for one pack a wrench to do my care on the road. I read somewhere a person complaining about the weight of the device used to cinch down down the seat with allen bolts, perhaps it weighs a pound or two!? Looks like a lead weight. Anyway, these attributes are nice anti theft devices, no? The cutaway on the frame is something I've heard no one complain about. Perhaps this was done to allow for precise placement of the front derailleur?! Aerodynamic? Your guess is as good as mine!

The axle bolt might not be a big deal, and possibly a better security factor, especially if it's possible to get a locking bolt.

I tried to zoom in on that seat binder, but couldn't get close enough view to see what it was all about. Looked clunky though. But...it's a $159 bike!

The seat tube cutaway thing looks like it sort of might have been intended for aerodynamics or derailleur mounting, as you and simple nature noted. Hard to know for sure. I recall seeing bikes where cutaways like that follow the curve of the wheel for a greater length. Those looked good. This one doesn't so much, but it seems kind of a minor thing.

I can imagine some people with a very modest budget, buying this thing, and riding the wheels off it...driving people with fancier, more expensive bikes...nuts.

Dovestrobe
07-04-2011, 07:43 PM
Watch the funny video explaining this device! Price $7.11

http://www.bikemanforu.com/products/Bicycle-Flashlight-Holder-mounts-on-handlebar.html

Dovestrobe
07-05-2011, 11:59 AM
I just purchased Mother's aluminum polish $5.99 (one's bike gleams with this stuff!) and spray lube $9.99 multi purpose (huge can) for my chain. Went to car quest off of SW Allen. My major complaint was that they didn't have bike racks. I locked up to a tree on a little hill between the parked cars. Good thing I brought my cable!

I said, "You'd probably double your business if you had bike racks." They didn't take kindly to my comment. :):)

In addition a great place to buy reflective tape for one's bike. Course tools are also available for one's convenience.

fourknees
07-05-2011, 03:49 PM
Watch the funny video explaining this device! Price $7.11

http://www.bikemanforu.com/products/Bicycle-Flashlight-Holder-mounts-on-handlebar.html

You can make something similar with an old bike tube for smaller flashlights. Cut a section of the tube about 2 inches wide (more or less depending on your flashlight size), cut this small tube section so you have a rectangular piece and then cut two holes in each end. Put flashlight through one hole, around handle bar and back whole on the flashlight. This has worked well for my 2AA maglite.

Dovestrobe
07-06-2011, 01:06 PM
You can make something similar with an old bike tube for smaller flashlights. Cut a section of the tube about 2 inches wide (more or less depending on your flashlight size), cut this small tube section so you have a rectangular piece and then cut two holes in each end. Put flashlight through one hole, around handle bar and back whole on the flashlight. This has worked well for my 2AA maglite.

Do you have a way of taking a photo of this and posting it? Thanks!

wsbob
07-13-2011, 10:28 PM
http://www.gmc-denaliroadbike.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/GMCDelaniRoadBike.jpg
Made by Kent bike company. GMC Denali

$159.00 at walmart (50.8 et 57cm frame)... 63cm (more expensive @ $179.00) , shipping included. Yet it is well built and has rave reviews on amazon and YouTube!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKf7YDIGUvU

I am tempted to purchase this 28 pounder for cruising when off my tank mountain bike steed.

Specifications:
Frame: Aluminum 7005 straight gauge
Handlebar: Maesbend W: 430mm D:22.0mm
Gearing: 21-speed
Shifters: Shimano Revo SIS L2/R7
Front Derailleur: Shimano FD-TZ 31 Index
Rear Derailleur: Shimano RD-TZ30GS 7SPD
Saddle: Cionlli Black
Seat post: HL Aluminum Micro Adjust 27.2 x 300 mm
Brakes: Promax 501A Alloy Caliper Brake
Brake levers: Promax BL-250AP Aluminum
Tires: Kenda Black With Grey Band 700X28C
Rims: Vitesse Alloy black 700CX14GX36H
Pedals: VP-990S plastic body with steel cage
Fork: GMC Series 7000 steel
Chain: KMC Z 51
Crankset: Prowheel Alloy 335P6 28X38X48 170mm
Stem: Aluminum black EXT:100mm 0D.
Alloy calipers and ally brake levers
High-profile alloy Vitesse racing rims
Dimensions: 68"L x 18"W x 40"H
Assembly required
Warranty: lifetime frame, 1-year parts


I'd be tempted to change out the pedals, change the tires, put better tire (spoke) tape in the wheels, remove the plastic guards and kick stand. And make sure the bottom bracket is good and tight prior to riding.


Dovestrobe, maybe you did a search, found and browsed this thread, but just in case, here's a link to a bikeforums member review of the GMC Denali road bike: bikeforums member review of GMC Denali road bike (http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/237231-Review-on-the-GMC-Denali-bicycle)

Dovestrobe
07-14-2011, 02:32 PM
Yes, I believe I did read that review. Gives the bike due justice.

Recently I received my new on a budget flashers at http://www.lightinthebox.com/wholesale-Bike-Lights_c3093:
181

Pretty nice! Two very tiny screws hold the clip to the back of the device. If you decide to purchase these, use a screw driver to open them, otherwise the back clip may break off as it did for me. No problem though, super glued it back together.

I used one of the light's seat post mounts to make a flashlight mount for my 3 LED flashlight I purchased for a dollar at Dollar Tree:
182
183
184

I used plumbers tape to extend the blinky light's seat post mount length, then I used an old toe clip strap to fasten the mount.

fourknees
07-15-2011, 08:50 AM
Do you have a way of taking a photo of this and posting it? Thanks!

MAGlight (2AA) with LED conversion and how tube is cut: (basicially a big rubberband).

Easier to mount under handlebars so all weight is below and not having to balance.

Another angle with light on. You could also put some non-slip materials around the handlebar to keep it from sliding on a bare handlebar. It does hold well on a roadbike bar wrap material. Or put cut the holes closer together to make it tighter.

Simple and easily to mount and remove. hopefully the pictures show if not, they are in my album in my profile.

Dovestrobe
07-15-2011, 09:02 AM
Simple and easily to mount and remove. hopefully the pictures show if not, they are in my album in my profile.

Thanks! Very nice! Sometimes the easiest mechanical methods are the hardest to explain; or, for that matter the hardest for others to understand! A picture is worth a thousand words. I will probably make 2 of these mounts. You never know, my mount could always break or be stolen. This is the most affordable recycled mount I've ever seen!

fourknees
07-15-2011, 09:05 PM
Another tip is I used a grommet punch to make the holes. It just happened to be the perfect size.

wsbob
07-16-2011, 08:23 PM
Downtown today, at PSU, I saw one of the GMC Denali bikes...well, part of it...it had been converted to a single speed or fixed gear. The welds looked intact...no blobs or holes, but they had some of the deepest ripples I'd ever seen in welds on a bike frame. Headset and crankset looked to be very low quality. Couldn't tell much in observing the wheels. Bike had a lot of road dirt on it.

Interesting about the bikeforums review I posted the link to in the earlier comment; The OP suggested he was a very strong rider, and got 6000 miles out of the bike before a collision with a tree or a pole after a run in with a motor vehicle. His review of the Denali, high opinion of it, and claims about his performance on the bike were received very controversially by readers at bikeforums. The thread went to 50 some pages.

Simple Nature
07-17-2011, 12:35 AM
I was at the Hillsboro REI today and noticed their still sale priced womens Keen cycling sandals at $54 which is a great deal.

I was cornered by a sales guy and asked why the Men's were $115 and he said the womens were old stock... and asked what my size was. I am 11.5 on a good day and 12 on a bad. Today must have been bad because he walked out with a men's 11.5 (euro 45) at $54. Wouldn't you know I need a 12 (46) beause there crowded my toes just a bit.

Anyway, any of you guys that need a size 11.5 (45) pair of Keen sandals for a great price of $54, get over to REI in Hillsboro (Cornell Rd) and ask for Brian. He'll know what you're looking for. ...and of course, women still have this special available too on more sizes.

Dovestrobe
07-18-2011, 12:17 PM
A degreaser from dollar tree (yes, only a dollar) 40 fluid ounces! Had the urge this morning to overhaul my front wheel hub. I used this stuff and wow, things got super clean! Course you want to use rubber gloves or wash your hands really well immediately following, the stuff can be caustic to your skin.
192

canuck
07-18-2011, 08:13 PM
Be very careful with caustic cleaners on bike parts.

Many are anodized or clear coated and these products can harm both.

Dovestrobe
07-18-2011, 08:22 PM
Be very careful with caustic cleaners on bike parts.

Many are anodized or clear coated and these products can harm both.

Caution noted. But for inner hubs and chains (the dark parts), I doubt that being the case.

wsbob
07-21-2011, 08:22 PM
Dovestrobe, maybe you did a search, found and browsed this thread, but just in case, here's a link to a bikeforums member review of the GMC Denali road bike: bikeforums member review of GMC Denali road bike (http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/237231-Review-on-the-GMC-Denali-bicycle)

Apparently, somebody has come to feel that GMC Denali's are appreciating in value. Today on Craigslist Portland: 21 speed GMC denali road bike - $225 (Fairview, OR) (http://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/bik/2486247706.html)

http://images.craigslist.org/3mc3oa3l75Q35P05R4b79b2eb343dc987179d.jpg

http://images.craigslist.org/3n33o23l05Y65U65X2b79d53f1ba9f96116e0.jpg


Ad Text:


21 speed GMC denali road bike - $225 (Fairview, OR)
Date: 2011-07-21, 9:01PM PDT
Reply to: sale-bk9tn-2486247706@craigslist.org [Errors when replying to ads?]
Selling in a really good condition, 21 speed GMC 28 700C DENALI road bike, aluminum frame, aluminum pedals. Light weight. Very good, comfortable seat. Just had professional tune up done and new shemano cassete installed.

This bike is for tall riders. A very beautiful blue color.

Call (503)901-1799 or email.

dmc
08-19-2011, 06:01 PM
Just purchased a 1972 Schwinn Super Sport.

http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/bik/2549201896.html

I'm so happy right now. Just have to wait a couple more weeks before I can ride it. :)

Alan
08-19-2011, 06:51 PM
The CL post has been deleted by its author but here's what that model looks like:

http://www.schwinncruisers.com/wp-content/uploads/1972-schwinn-super-sport.jpg

That's from the 1972 Schwinn catalogue (http://www.schwinncruisers.com/schwinn-documentation/1972-schwinn-bicycle-catalog/)

Designed with the adult cyclist in mind-the rider who wants outstanding performance and a better bike with precision engineered components. Test ride the Schwinn Super Sport with hand brazed chrome molybdenum alloy steel lightweight frame. Choice of 10-speeds in a wide range derailleur gear, 33 to 100 ration; wide range 5-cog cluster, Schwinn-Approved 27” x 1 1/4” high performance sports touring tires, Schwinn Twin-Stick gear controls located at the handle-bar stem, Dual position handbrake levers and quick release hubs.

Choice of colors: Kool Lemon, Opaque Green, and Opaque Blue.

Sounds like a nice ride, fun and classy, and I'm glad to hear you're on the mend, dmc!

wsbob
08-19-2011, 07:10 PM
Just purchased a 1972 Schwinn Super Sport.

http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/bik/2549201896.html

I'm so happy right now. Just have to wait a couple more weeks before I can ride it. :)

Would you believe ...I once had a 70 or 71 model Super Sport. Root Beer Brown. The year it came with chrome forks. Had it quite a few years. Definitely better steel in the frame than a Varsity or Continental, but the components were low end. The wheels were alloy, but otherwise, just lousy...wouldn't stay true. Didn't know it at the time, but the spokes probably weren't sized right. The builders had just taken a grinder and ground the ends off where they extended past the bottom of the nipples. Ugly and messy.

None of that matters though. Glam your eyes on those frame joints...smooth, like Cannondale. The frame is a kind of beautiful, basic bike that you'll be able to make fly like the wind!

If you're curious, do a search over at bikeforums 'classic and vintage' category, and you'll find people that love the SS, and have upgraded and modernized them to be very nice performing rides.

dmc
08-20-2011, 02:17 AM
The bike I purchased today was manufactured in April, 1972 in the Schwinn Chicago Warehouse. The frame was done by hand. Truly the frame joints are something to be seen. It is so smooth like anything I have ever seen in a bicycle. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/schwinn-braze.html

The gentleman I bought it from had owned it for 18 years. He was less concerned with money and more so with the SS having a good home. I had offered this gentleman more money than he asked, but refused and just asked for the price he listed.

Now I just got to wait 3 more weeks for my collar bone to heal before I can ride it!!! :) Plenty of time to love the smooth frame joints.

http://img689.imageshack.us/img689/4374/3m93p43l65y25q35s1b8f87.jpg
http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/7524/3n63ma3o75y05u25s5b8fec.jpg
http://img806.imageshack.us/img806/9375/3na3k03pf5v35y05u2b8fec.jpg

wsbob
08-20-2011, 08:57 AM
dmc ...looks very good! Appears to still be quite original, including the Brooks B15 saddle. The saddle is one of the parts I kept from my SS...changed it out for an Avocet. I never much liked the brooks, but some people love them. Can't beat them for a classic vintage look though.

If you could get a nice, straight on side view of the drive side of the bike and post it with your other pics, that could be interesting to look at. I've learned from over at bikeforums that this is a useful view the members look for. Close-ups of derailleurs, crankset and other parts are interesting too.

I have to admit wrenching isn't something I look forward to doing. So my rides are kind of slow to get the attention they deserve. Something I've also learned at bikeforums though, is that especially with a vintage bike like this that may not have been serviced in a long while, something the really knowledgeable members highly recommend, is to thoroughly go through the bike from top to bottom. Over a period of years, the grease can dry up, get gummed up, and cease being able to do its job.

The one piece crank...I've always thought that was kind of lame. It's heavy, and to me, doesn't have the aesthetic appeal of better quality three piece allow cranks. If you ever decide you're interested, there's adapters that allow a three piece alloy crank to be installed on the SS. I've learned rather recently at bikeforums though, that some people have come to better understand the three piece, and have quite a bit of respect for it. Actually has a name...Ashtabula...from the city in Ohio where the idea for the crank design is said to have been conceived. Some members at bikeforums say the Ashtabula's in vintage Schwinn bikes are very well made, indestructible, and the bearings set up very nice. So if you're fine with a little extra weight, it should work out well enough.

So...bottom bracket, headset, then hubs ...and so on. Hope and pray your stem and seat post come right out and haven't been locked in place by corrosion. If they have, there's ways to get them out, with care, patience and determination. But maybe you know all this stuff. Good luck and enjoy!

wsbob
09-04-2011, 10:59 PM
Actually, not a bike for sale, but browsing over at bikeforums, I ran across one of those type threads posted by a guy asking about the bike he bought cheap for riding around college. Maybe some of you will enjoy reading a bit of the exchange between the OP and the other bikeforum members. Oh...Here's a pic of the bike the OP posted:


http://i51.tinypic.com/xnete8.jpg


over at bikeforums: Zunow bought for college campus bike (http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/765321-Picked-up-this-Zunow-for-college-want-info)

Alan
09-05-2011, 03:13 PM
JetBoil and MSR make very cool high-tech stoves that are quite light...and pricey ($65 for the most basic JetBoil). Instead, you can make your own stove that is lighter, costs less, runs on alcohol (available everywhere) and works just fine. In fact, you may be able to scrounge the parts you need to make it for free! There is actually a whole range of simple alcohol-burning stoves around. A commercially available Trangia (nice brass unit) is about $35. But that's still more than you have to spend, and it's a little heavier than this one you can make for yourself which works just as well.

There is loads of info scattered around about homemade alcohol stoves--search for things like "pop-can stove" or "penny stove"--but the two sites that helped me the most:

1. http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/ - Mark Jurey's instructions for building and operating a penny stove. If you read all his directions and follow them carefully, IT WILL WORK! Some directions are on different pages, so browse it all before you begin constructing a stove.

2. http://zenstoves.net/ - General information on many kinds do-it-yourself stoves with lots of background info, comparisons and links to other sites.

The very first penny stove I made worked but I did need to seal it up with JB Weld epoxy as explained on Jurey's site because the crimps on the burner ring slightly split the side of the fuel cup, and it leaked slightly around the burner ring. Same with the second attempt. The trick for me was gently tapping the burner top into the fuel cup, moving around it as I tapped, rather than pressing the whole thing in at once. The first one had too small a fuel cup depth and the second was too deep, but they still worked. By the third, fourth and fifth tries, I nailed it every time, no epoxy, even experimenting a bit with dimensions, can size, jet locations, base construction, etc. Once you have production set up, it takes about 10 minutes to mark, drill, cut and assemble the burner. The wire pot stand and windscreen are another 10-15 minutes total, but they can be re-used with various burners; you don't need to make them each time you try a new burner. The stove needs the whole system to work properly: burner, burner stand, simmer ring, pot stand, pot and windscreen. So, before you throw up your arms and scream "it's just not working right," be sure you have put together the whole kit!

Many kinds of aluminum cans will work just fine but some seem to fit better or have a ring around the bottom that makes for better flame-jet positioning. My favorite burner so far is made from two Budweiser Clamato beer can bottoms, with the top of a 12-oz Red Bull can for a base which fits perfectly (all scrounged). One made from two Tecate cans for both burner and base, as Jurey describes, also works perfectly (drank those :D). My third good one is from Steel Reserve 24-oz beer cans (scrounged, no way I'm drinking that!), and the next one will be from Arizona Ice Tea 23-oz cans with a base from one of those Bud Clamato tops. (PS - that one works very nicely, too.)

Last night, my Tecate penny stove brought 2 cups of cold tap water to a full boil in about 4 minutes. After a couple test runs to figure out the simmer ring[1] I decided to actually cook a rice-and-lentil curry dish on it. It worked perfectly, heating the water quickly, then simmering down a a gentle boil for about 25 minutes of cooking time until the alcohol burned out, followed by another 10 minutes resting under a cozy of towels. Recipe: 2 C water, 1/2 C brown rice, 1/3 C orange lentils, 1 t curry powder; came out a little wet but just fine for rehydrating after hiking/biking. No scorching on the bottom of the pot!

I'll leave the construction and operation instructions to those other websites, particularly the Jurey site, but just to indicate how cheap and light it is, here's the materials list:


Two or three aluminum cans . . . . . . . . . . free (or cost of whatever beverage you choose)
One or two wire coat hangers . . . . . . . . . free (or some other similar guage wire)
18" of fine steel or copper wire . . . . . . . . free (scroungable; e.g. florist wire)
One penny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $0.01
Aluminum dryer duct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.00 [2]
HEET alcohol fuel dryer . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.50 12-oz [3]
Cooking pot (1-2 qt) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14.00 (~6" diam; e.g. Open Country aluminum) [4]
Lighter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.00 (or matches, or lucky find)


For tools you'll need a ruler or measuring tape, drill (1/16" bit; you could substitute a push-pin or sharp tack for the drill), scissors, Sharpie, thick book (phone book), straight edge, pliers with wire cutters for pot stand. Tin snips for the windscreen or you could do it with a sharp knife and straight-edge, or with tough scissors, kitchen or pruning sheers. Fine sandpaper for finishing edges (optional). Once you've assembled materials, tools and have Jurey's instructions handy, it will take about an hour to build your first full set-up.

Burner, windscreen and pot stand will all pack down into the pot, and even the fuel if you decant it into a 4-oz plastic squirt bottle (which is plenty of fuel for dinner and breakfast for two). The thin wire is for assembling the coat hanger wire pot stand. All the rest of the details are well presented on Jurey's site, although I strongly suggest a slightly modified simmer ring[1]. Total weight is around one pound depending on the pot and how much fuel you pack. Burner alone is about 1/2 ounce, windscreen and pot stand an ounce or so each.

[1] Make the simmer ring out of the same heavier-guage aluminum as the windscreen. Thin ones from the sides of aluminum cans burn up very easily.

[2] Get dryer vent at any hardware store. You could also try a disposable roasting pan or other scrounged aluminum sheeting that is a bit thicker than aluminum cans, but the dryer vent is just about perfect. One section of dryer vent will make enough for several complete stoves, each stove using two pieces: 4"x12" for the windscreen and 3/4"x~9" for the simmer ring.

[3] Any highly distilled alcohol will work as fuel. For testing and home use, I go with cheap denatured from the hardware store. For camping, I'll pick up some 190-proof Everclear from the liquor store for its higher heat value and because it can double for "medicinal purposes" in a cup of cocoa. HEET (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&cp=4&gs_id=q&xhr=t&q=heet&tok=zpwFwURI9aubRQnUCBuFdQ&safe=off&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1366&bih=598&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=7251469802236187240&sa=X&ei=RUrsTtOcEKqciQKekM2CBA&sqi=2&ved=0CGIQ8wIwAw) is available darn near anywhere--auto stores, super markets, convenience stores, gas stations--so it's available en route on most bike journeys; get the yellow bottle, not red (which has a lower grade alcohol which makes less heat).

[4] Lots of choices! You might already have a camping pot which will work, or you can spend more for titanium to shave a few ounces. I had a stainless steel 1-qt camping pot that works very nicely, a little heavier but transfers heat very well.

Caution! Safety!
NEVER use petroleum products in these stoves!
NO: gasoline, white gas, diesel, kerosene, etc.
Alcohol burns with a clear flame, and all parts get very hot even if you can't see the flame, so be careful when these stoves are lit.

dmc
09-06-2011, 03:44 PM
Still recovering from a bike wreck 6 weeks past, I have found to time do a complete overhaul on the Super Sport I purchased a couple weeks ago.

I have disassembled the bike and separated the components. From there I have taken an individual component (ex: front brakes, read derailleur) and broken it down into individual nuts, bolts, washers, pieces. At this time I clean each part by hand with a toothbrush and a rag. I'm just using Ajax dish washing super degreaser and a bunch of elbow grease. After each piece has been cleaned I've been removing any rust with fine steel wool. I rinse the pieces after the steel wool treatment to remove any steel hairs. I then Dry, grease and assemble all the pieces to a given component.

Sorry about the low quality camera phone pictures. =)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://img84.imageshack.us/img84/8214/chainringandcrankarms.jpg
I am very happy with the way the way this came out.

http://img29.imageshack.us/img29/5296/frontchainringandcranka.jpg
Rust specs were easy to remove due to all the large flat surfaces.

http://img695.imageshack.us/img695/9720/frontbrakes.jpg
I spent the most time scrubbing the springs on this. The end result was a much smoother operating and cleaner looking component that I could have imagined would have resulted.

http://img651.imageshack.us/img651/1725/frontbrakeswithrustybac.jpg
Here is a side by side with the restored front brake and the untouched back brake. Notice how rusty the springs are on the back brake. Esp. the right one.

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/1725/frontbrakeswithrustybac.jpg
Here is another side by side. They swamped sides here. This picture really accentuates the cleanliness of the restored brake and shows off the shine factor difference.

http://img190.imageshack.us/img190/157/bearingst.jpg
These guys were dreamy how easily there came out and cleaned up.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I've also restored the front wheel to the best of my abilities. I have trued it to a satisfactory level. Overhauled the bearings. Scrubbed the rim and tire inside and out.

I have not been able to remove the handlebar stem. After reading a similar issue on bikeforums.net I have concluded that the wedge bolt is stuck/rusted to the inside housing of the fork tube. I have taken action to attempt to remove the stem and failed. I don't have a lot of experience with the older bikes and rust complications so I am definitely gonna take it into the bike shop and see if they can do something with it. I'm concerned that I might bend or brake something of importance if I mess with it. I am definitely on a budget and am kind of bummed out that I will go need to pay for help. I just hope they can get it out without it costing too much.

The cables and cable housings are not in too hot of condition. I'm going to remove and keep all the original wires and housings but replace them with new cables and housings for as long as I own the bike (hopefully forever).

Last but not least, I'm not too fond the handlebar tape on the bike. However, I wouldn't dream of removing it. Its a little off color from the Kool Lemon of the bike frame and it offers virtually no cushion for the rider's hands. I feel like a newbie asking this... but, can I just cover it with a new layer of bar tape without hurting it? That way I can keep the original tape on and acquire the look and feel of what I want?

I'm gonna post an update in a week or so. =)

wsbob
09-06-2011, 04:42 PM
DMC, re; Super Sport overhaul:

My knowledge from the regulars over at bikeforums, is that for rust, oxalic acid does the trick of removing the rust. Different ways of getting oxalic acid are in deck wash from the hardware store, home depot, etc...from a chemistry supply in powder form...mix 2 percent or something like that, with water.

Guys use 000 or 0000 steel wool. Some claim aluminum foil crumpled up removes rust.

They mention some kind of product named McGuires for waxiing chrome.


Stuck stems and seatposts can be a bear. Lots of threads on this over at bikeforums. Lots of methods for removing them. Two basic factors are responsible for the problem: oxidation from the contact of aluminum next to the steel of the steerer tube plus rain and sweat that seeps in between those parts. Also, dried up grease from the last time it was serviced. Routine, yearly checking on the stem, cleaning and regreasing it is recommended to avoid the stuck stem problem, but many people don't do this...including me. Stems and seat posts getting stuck likely had a bit to do with why manufacturers came up with the idea for those ugly threadless stems that most bikes today have.

First, easiest prep for attempting to remove the stem is getting a can of PB Blaster...$5...Fred's has it. Figure out a way to spray the stuff between stem and inside of steerer tube. Takes anywhere from hours to days to weeks for it to penetrate and do the job. You'll have to figure out ways to apply leverage so as to twist the stem without screwing anything up. It's a challenge.

Other thing some have tried is a aerosol product called Freeze-Off. Auto parts stores have it. Idea is to spray it on the stem making it contract away from the inside of steerer tube just sufficiently to allow the stem to be twisted and broken free of whatever is holding it fast inside the steerer tube.

The shop is going to have to try all these things too...not really any special tools involved, so you might as well give it a shot yourself.

Worst case scenario is having to saw off the top of the stem, then making vertical cuts inside the stem to the inside of the steerer tube to break it free. People have had to resort to this method, but it's difficult and tricky.

I had a stuck stem in my trek 560. Nerve wracking experience. Went the PB Blaster route for 3 wks. Still had to turn the bike over to put the stem in a vise and twist the forks with a two by four between the fork blades...not the smartest idea...but I got lucky and didn't screw up the forks except for a very slight depression on the inside surfaces of the forks. Fortunately, the alignment didn't get messed up. Better probably, to somehow safely get the head of the forks in the vise and twist on the stem. Hopefully, your stem will come out much, much easier!


Unless you're really a purist, I wouldn't sweat taking off the old bar tape. At least on my SS, I thought the stuff was lousy. If you really want to preserve it for future use, take it off, put it in a box and store it. There's lots of nice tapes out there...cork, even leather (expensive). Both my bikes need it. I might do cork, but I'm hoping I can still order Benotto celo tape to top it off. Got a link to a source but haven't tried it yet. Not everyone liked Benotto, which came in bright, clear colors...smooth surface...stayed clean. It was a hit with racers for a short period. On the 560, I had it wrapped over a cushiony type of bar tape. Actually, still partly do!

Alan
09-06-2011, 10:35 PM
Still recovering from a bike wreck 6 weeks past, I have found to time do a complete overhaul on the Super Sport I purchased a couple weeks ago...

Best wishes on the recovery!

My two cents on the repairs/restoration:

Any rust on bearings (either the balls or the race; the cage isn't critical) means new bearings; no way to effectively clean those; the damage is done. Price is really pretty reasonable. Yeah, I've reassembled some bearings which were less than pristine...do what you have to do...it does make it hard/impossible to get them adjusted right.

I avoid steel wool, especially on aluminum (brake calipers, etc). It embeds tiny slivers which subsequently react with the base metal and make pits. Try Scotch-Brite instead. Also, automotive degreaser solutions are cheap and readily available at any auto parts store. Read the labels, ask the counter guys. Don't use gasoline...huge fire hazard. Those chainrings look shiny! :)

I bet someone makes replacement plastic bar tape for old Schwinns, no? Or "new old stock"? Like wsbob, I'm not a fan of that old tape (from days on my Continental), but I do understand wanting to preserve it for historic or restoration value. You could certainly wrap over it, that's not unusual. Folks who want a thicker, cushier bar do two layers all the time. If preserving the old tape is the idea, choose a new tape with minimal adhesive. The cork wrap I'm using had no adhesive, and some foamy Specialized tape I used on something else was also bare on the back.

Your LBS undoubtedly has cables, housings, end caps and crimps, or Universal Cycles (http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/index.php?category=7) has kits in various price levels. You need a largish, very sharp diagonal cutter or a special bike cable tool, too. Most bike tools have a nice pincer for the crimps, and maybe an awl to ream out the cut end of the housing. Burrs and rough edges there will cause early cable wear.

A stuck stem can be a bear. Try the penetrating oils wsbob mentioned, also Marvel Mystery Oil (my fav) or Liquid Wrench. Soak plenty into the joint between stem and head tube. You'll need to keep dripping it in to the top joint very frequently (minutes/hours) for days, since it only holds a drop or two at a time. Take the stem bolt all the way out and put some joint juice down that hole each time, too, to penetrate around the wedge end of the stem. After a few days or week of that, flip the frame upside down and dribble in a goodly amount through the bottom bearing, and let is soak in that position for another few days. In that position, replace the stem bolt to keep the oil from dripping through the hole.

As it's soaking in both positions, try twisting the bars in a steering motion while holding the wheel straight. Use lots and lots of mildly forceful back-and-forth to fatigue the corrosion bond rather than gorilla-strength torque which might bend or snap the wrong things. If you've ever tried to straighten misaligned bars without loosening them (like after a crash), it feels sort of like that.

After you've soaked as much penetrating oil into the joint as your patience allows, it's time to apply force. A 24-oz brass hammer is perfect, but you can also us a chunk of brass or aluminum about 1/4" thick, that you can grab with pliers while holding it on top of the stem bolt so that it slightly cushions the blow of a regular hammer (it protects the head of the stem bolt). This is one time when it's nice to have that Schwinn stem bolt head sticking up proud of the stem!

Next, tighten the stem bolt down all the way snug, then back it out about two turns. The idea is to have nearly all of its threads engaged in the wedge, deep in the head tube, to transfer the force to the wedge, and just enough free play to allow shock from the hammer to pop the wedge free of the tube, maybe 1/16" or so.

Hold the brass/alum shim snug against the stem bolt and give it a good, solid rap straight down the stem bolt line. Stop and wiggle the bars. If no luck, line up shim and hammer and whack it again. It may take a dozen or more blows to break it free.

The couple times I've had to do this operation, I succeeded with leaving the wheel and inflated tire on the bike. The tire will soak up much of the impact, avoiding damage to things like dropouts and rim, but still allows the initial shock to break the wedge or stem free of the tube. If it doesn't work that way, then I'd remove the wheel and go to bracing a 2x4, longer than the forks, against the bottom of the fork crown, and repeat the hammer blows. After a dozen or so whacks, put in some more penetrating oil and give it more time to soak.

Good luck!

dmc
09-06-2011, 11:09 PM
Thanks for the awesome feedback guys! I have managed to free the wedge bolt. The stem is still not giving atm. It's gonna soak again tonight (PB Blaster). Will post back.

wsbob
12-03-2011, 10:50 AM
We've temporarily diverted from this thread's primary topic 'Deals for the Low Budget Cyclist', lending support to getting Alan in his efforts to refurbish his vintage Schwinn Super Sport and get it back on the road.

Now it's time to again have the eagle eyes out for good deals. In the last couple weeks, new threads were started, one for sleeping bags, another for the REI sale. Nothing wrong with doing that I suppose, but I'm thinking for the sake of simplicity, it may be a good idea to generally keep the announcement of good deals connected to a single thread.

Something up today, is the availability of a water resistant chartreusy colored jacket over at Old Navy...$18, marked down from $40 or thereabouts. The color is quite bright and related to, but doesn't have the intensity of Hi-Vis green or Day-Glo orange, which some people averse to those shades might actually prefer.

The jacket fabric is polyester. It has a mesh lining in the body, sheet lining in the sleeves. Has a zippered hood (which I'm not keen on...might cut it out.) Front hand pockets. Tried to find a pic of the jacket over at Old Navy's site, but one doesn't seem to be there. It's a comfortable fitting jacket, but not generously sized. I got an XL for my 6' 165lb bod. Large would have worked, but I like tops big so they don't drag on my shoulders when I curve them and for better ventilation. Old Navy in the Beav had some XXL sizes.

Here's a pic of a jacket I was considering...am still considering getting...over at Performance Bike. It's Hi-Vis green, lighter construction, no hood, no front pockets, polyester, water resistant, more than twice the money. This jacket is more contour fitted like the cycling jacket it is, whereas the Old Navy jacket is more of a track jacket cut. If I remember correctly though from trying it on, the Performance jacket was fitted very close, and for my fit preference, I needed the XXL.

I like Hi-Vis green, but just wasn't sure I wanted to be wearing that intensity of color every time I was on the bike when it was kind of nippy out (The Old Navy Jacket will be more yellow than this yellow-green Hi-Vis). I may still get it though, as an alternate jacket. Maybe the sale will get better.

http://media.performancebike.com/images/performance/products/medium/10-5390-HVY-FRONT.jpgNot the Old Navy Jacket, but instead, the Performance Bike Jacket

wsbob
12-15-2011, 11:17 PM
Just an update on the Old Navy Hi-Vis yellow jacket: I've now road tested it, so I can say with certainty that is works good...allows nicely for ventilation through the full length zipper down as needed, allowing air to flow in and up around back of the neck and shoulders...so the inside of the jacket doesn't sweat up so much like some water resistant jackets do. This was on a 40-45 degree day, up the hill from Beaveton to Fairmount Blvd, around three times and back down.

Had some doubts as to the brightness of the Old Navy Hi-Vis, but after comparing it side by side with other actual Hi-Vis yellow-green fabrics, it turns out that it's just a little less bright than some of them, but still very bright.

Just was to Old Navy Cedar Hills Crossing-Beaverton again tonight. Three of the jackets remain: A small, a medium, and an XXL. On clearance, now $16.50

wsbob
01-12-2012, 01:09 AM
I seem to recall one of the lady forum members likes pink. Late at night just kind of browsing around nashbar looking at deals before I hit the sack. What's this? Nashbar unloading its junk for 75 percent off...hmmm...what do they got? Oh, well looky here for the girl that loves Pink! Nice Shoes!

http://media.nashbar.com/images/nashbar/products/medium/YS-A2W-PK-ANGLE.jpg


Diadora Women's Aerospeed 2 Road Shoes (http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_533447_-1_203258_10000_203266)

wsbob
01-25-2013, 12:40 AM
Good price: $60, down from $114, nice, self contained, USB rechargeable headlight tomorrow, Friday the 25th for Performance Bicycle's 'Deal of the Day':

Cygolite Pace 400 at Perfomance Bike (http://www.performancebike.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&langId=-1&productId=1126897&storeId=10054)

I've used the Pace 150 for the last couple years, riding occasionally in the evenings, and at night. In a low light or dark setting, on the high setting, I can see well enough to ride 10-15 mph on decent pavement with confidence, but a little more illumination would be nice. I figure this light is two and a half times brighter than the 150.

Apennine
01-29-2013, 10:38 AM
I get Google Offers and every now and then, the Bike Safety light from http://www.bikeglow.com/ is offered for $13 instead of $25.

I don't know if they're any good, but the current offer expires in 13 days. https://www.google.com/offers/ppo/SELF/7EDH9U6RN3DWZGAR?loc=dcdb08976299ecb0&utm_source=ppo&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=dailyppo&utm_content=primary&targeting=AJmZVmfVm-kTjdEvsAEgHd8lwTAC5ajzCZxIf2kfcku_G7EWGYmLlGBwN28N sqGM0TXjHp5QVaUbpEXwBLSkFXRmSr_LhDFway7MGbH3C9lvLY mZuiSOfpROvfurZhjgRDxxnufWVerGe7kd9pdgXsyeLiawD2Wt VuyaeVw6W0z6tobVPsydfh24uW0Po1GaIePbQlRy1BeGt9HkoI 6XTmDcfznWxxiQJYbZ7BXLV5mpcUx3LFyCZGLzndvuI3TOAXnt U9HcAmsLShDmoqEnaEPDLMsnPfQgQsaX8UGueTqUkmQS7iSXSc 4

wsbob
02-01-2013, 10:57 AM
I saw at Fred's in Beaverton, a few of the Vivitar 'go-pro' knock-offs with a steep markdown: $40, down from $100. Didn't study the specs, don't know what it can do, but it's most likely not going to do what a $300 go-pro can.

Still, maybe it has some good use for some of you smart people out there. I can say this: the camera looks good on the outside. By just a quick glance, it looked to me a lot like the go-pro, with the clear plastic shell.

Zymurgy
02-09-2013, 04:50 PM
Kenton Cycle Repair is having a 20% off of tune ups special for February. Free estimates and other deals as well. Good little shop that focuses on keeping the current and discarded bikes on the road and not so much of adding new ones. Great welding skills as well.
http://kentoncyclepdx.com/

wsbob
03-06-2013, 09:23 AM
Fred's Beaverton has one remaining of the earlier mentioned Vivitar go-pro knockoff's, again at $40. I have no personal experience to recommend this unit. If anyone knows this would be a good deal for them, now's the time. You could roll your bike right into the NW entrance to the store and pick it up

wsbob
04-19-2013, 10:46 PM
At Beaverton Target on Beav/Hillsdale Hwy Friday, clearance rack, there were a number of Hi-Vis orange Champion brand long sleeve three-quarter zip running jerseys. Very nice lightweight sueded fleece fabric. A range of sizes from S to XL, possibly XXL too ...sorry, didn't look. Half-price at $12.50

Label says 'running', but I'd say the fit is fine for casual cycling too. No back pockets. Under arms appear to be cut generously, rather than close like racing jerseys. Especially for the money, it's good quality for a good deal.

wsbob
10-05-2013, 10:25 PM
For guys, maybe gals, depending: Bright orange micro fleece vest, at Fred's...$12.99 sale price. 'Great Northwest' brand: Not quite hi-vis orange...In the store, I compared it side by side, next to something that was hi-vis...but it's getting there.

It's got zip pockets, nice for storing keys and I.D., billfold, etc. Pockets are a bit odd, in that they're spaced kind of close together, so they're not deep, not really enough room for putting big sized hands into. Fabric is nice quality, soft, dense.

Big sizes too...up to 2XL, and I think, tall sizes as well.

So I bought one last week, tried it a couple times already, works great. Large sz fits well on my medium build.

wsbob
10-14-2013, 11:37 PM
Price update on the fleece vests...bright orange and other colors...at Fred's: surprising to me, the previous sale price has dropped another $3, making it $9.99. I think I may be able to walk in tomorrow and get some money back.

As I said before, it's decent quality and construction. Some Chinese worker...China is where the tag says it's made...most likely worked very hard for very little to put these vests together. Depending upon how strictly you follow your responsible buying conscience, this low-buck stuff may not be the deal for you.

Simple Nature
10-15-2013, 12:51 PM
I should have posted this here when I got one.

This is a great deal on a rainproof jacket. Relative light and does pack in its own pouch. Selection is decreasing fast. Only XL (yellow/red) and XXL (red) now. This should include free shipping!

This is a closeout (although they don't say that)

But when looking for a nice rain jacket... this turned out to be a pretty good deal. Regularly $100, closeout at $55. Only a bit more than the generic stuff so I consider this a good deal.

Only difference I can see in the current model and last years is the waterproof zipper on the breast pocket. Otherwise, all the seams are treated on the inside and lots of vents.

http://www.rei.com/product/818947/novara-express-20-bike-jacket-mens

Comes in red or yellow

http://www.rei.com/media/tt/617d7c08-00b7-4a57-935d-0ea96706b1d6.jpg

Of course, I found this -after- I got totally drenched one day 20 miles from home.
Now I am prepared.

wsbob
10-17-2013, 01:01 PM
Simple Nature....good find...nice picture of it posted here too...looks like the jacket may be a fair investment of $55...nice discount from retail.


Another hi-vis deal: Old Navy has an active collection...basically running based I suppose, but from my experience, well suited for biking that doesn't involve racing. A little more relaxed fit than for example, racing jerseys.

Among what O-N has on its clearance racks now, is a hi-vis orange LS half zip polyester jersey type top. Has a 2" high collar. This is a more or less standard, familiar design that other big active wear brands have their own version of. Made in Egypt. $8.99, marked down from $25. In Beaverton, one XL, quite a few L, M, maybe one or two S. Again, not a true hi-vis orange, but very bright, nice shade.

wsbob
10-19-2013, 10:27 PM
Today, over at TJ Maxx...Hi-vis green with some black insets and bits of retro-reflective silver trim, men's full zip, zip front pockets. Brooks running jacket, water resistant, limited availability, two XL size when I was there, $19.00 down from $60. Nice quality. Snappy designing, appearance.

I was tempted, but I've already got a fairly bright jacket that's working.

wsbob
10-28-2013, 06:21 PM
Bike Gallery Beaverton: deal on a nice hi-vis green jacket. Endura brand. Has a fair bit of retro-reflective material on shoulders and back. Underarm zippers. Heavier jacket, I would think it would make a good commuter jacket. Not super low cost but a decent deal at $70 down from around $140. Not a whole bunch, but a good range of sizes remain, including a 2XXL.

Has what to me is a gimmicky feature, but interesting: small LED incorporated into the back of the jacket about waist level, powered by a watch battery. Personally, I wouldn't bother with the LED, but have fun with it if you like it.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/412bfuPCuFL.jpg

dmc
11-21-2013, 05:16 PM
One of my pedals snapped off yesterday. Was looking to find some used steel pedals. Maybe ones with toe clips. Can anyone recommend a bike shop with an ample selection of used bike parts that might have some pedals?

Thanks in advance.

Simple Nature
11-21-2013, 08:14 PM
One of my pedals snapped off yesterday. Was looking to find some used steel pedals. Maybe ones with toe clips. Can anyone recommend a bike shop with an ample selection of used bike parts that might have some pedals?

Thanks in advance.

http://www.citybikes.coop/

Alan
11-22-2013, 10:03 AM
http://www.citybikes.coop/

The City Bikes at 20th & SE Ankeny, for used parts. Also try http://www.communitycyclingcenter.org/ at 17th & NE Alberta.

dmc
11-22-2013, 11:06 AM
thank you!