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bubbaPDX
10-21-2009, 03:16 PM
I reviewed an earlier discussion (http://www.bikeportland.org/forum/showthread.php?t=458) on riding in rain with eyewear, and thought it might be time to squeegee off the subject again.

I wear prescription glasses, and have a problem with fogging. In fact, I'd say the fogging is a worse issue than water drops on my lenses (I can at least see around the drops). The fog may appear from my own breath, or from the heat of my face under certain cold, wet conditions.

You'd think there was a common lens treatment out there. The earlier discussion mentioned Cat Crap (http://www.webbikeworld.com/r2/motorcycle-helmet-visor-anti-fog/) (out of business, but still in inventory?), which is also packaged as Veratti Fog Fixer (http://www.eyewearsupercenter.com/Veratti-Fog-Fixer-p/ac1005.htm).

Any other products you know of?

Any idea where to find Cat Crap locally, other than the litter box in my basement? :D

Bent Bloke
10-22-2009, 08:12 AM
The downtown REI carries Cat Crap. I picked up some a couple of weeks ago.

It works pretty well, but this morning the fog was thick enough that it still condensed on the outside of my glasses. I just took them off.

And when it's raining the humidity can get so high that it still defeats the Cat Crap. But it's better than anything else I've tried.

bubbaPDX
10-22-2009, 08:57 AM
Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a try.

[wish I could take off my glasses, but eyesight is trending in the opposite direction]

lynnef
10-25-2009, 12:46 PM
I've had reasonable success with an old Smith No-Fog cloth that came with an old pair of ski goggles...

canuck
10-26-2009, 09:19 AM
Hears a cheap version.

Take a drop of liquid hand/dish soap.

Rub it on both sides of the lens with a soft cloth until the lens is clear.

The glasses won't fog.

You have to apply it more often but much less expensive than the commercial brands.

Also works great on you bathroom mirror. No fog after showers.

bubbaPDX
10-29-2009, 08:37 AM
Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a try.

[wish I could take off my glasses, but eyesight is trending in the opposite direction]

Cat Crap doesn't work worth... well, crap.

Even on a cool, dry morning, my heat and perspiration were fogging up the inner edges of the lenses.

In this morning's cold rain, fuggedaboudit.

http://i248.photobucket.com/albums/gg181/msgough/shatter_proof_glasses.jpg

A colleague is bringing in his scuba mask treatment. Will report back ASAP.

biciclero
10-30-2009, 03:01 PM
Take a drop of liquid hand/dish soap.

Rub it on both sides of the lens with a soft cloth until the lens is clear.

This sounds like my kind of solution. What happens if the lenses subsequently get wet? Does it just cause the raindrops to "sheet", or can it generate some suds? I could imagine trying this just on the insides of my lenses, where the fog forms, but leaving the outside soap-free.

RonC
10-30-2009, 03:46 PM
Its a fairly common practice for open-water swimmers to rub the inside of their goggles with a drop of Johnson & Johnson's baby shampoo (no tears) to prevent fogging. I have not tried it for cycling, but it would seem the same principles would apply. I understand it's important that the surface be clean to start with.

Bent Bloke
10-30-2009, 05:16 PM
What about (this might sound gross) saliva? When I've used swimming goggles, I've always just spit in them, swished it out, and that works pretty well. Bonus: it's free!

I stopped trying to wear glasses when riding in the rain. But I'm farsighted, and only wear glasses when riding for protection. Plus, I now mostly roll on a hybrid, and the visor on my helmet keeps the rain out of my eyes. That isn't the case when I ride my recumbent. You get it right in the face in the recumbent position.

RonC
10-30-2009, 06:21 PM
All the rules change for recumbent riding! When I ride mine, I choose shields that minimize the space between my cheekbones and the bottom edge of the shields. Riding an upright double-diamond frame it's more important to have a good fitting brow that doesn't protrude into your field of vision.

And yes, spit does an OK job 75% of the time in swimming goggles, but for longer open water swims (when you don't want to have to stop and clear your goggles) baby shampoo is much better. I know that's what Oregon's own Michelle Macy used on her recent successful English Channel crossing. That's a pretty good recommendation in my book, and if it doesn't work you can still wash your hair with it! Wouldn't try that with Cap Crap... :)

canuck
10-31-2009, 07:56 AM
There's a second half to the equation here. That's the equipment. Your glasses need to support air circulation. When that warm moist air sits in contact with cool dry lenses you get condensation on the inside of the lens.

This can also work in the opposite way, you lenses warm up from being in close proximity to your face. You then hit colder moister air and you get condensation on the outside of the lens.

This is why you want to treat both sides of your lenses with any product.


You mention you wear prescription glasses. Are you just wearing your regular glasses or do you have a prescription insert the attaches to sport eye wear?

If you are wearing you basic daily wear glasses you may want to consider sports specific glasses that promote air circulation.

And if all else fails you can go my route. Contact lenses. Even if the glasses fog, you can take them off and maintain clear vision.

PDXGS
11-01-2009, 06:17 PM
http://www.motosolutions.com/
The make a decent solution for the inside and another for the outside of lenses. REI and Cycle Gear (motorcycle retailer) sell their products. You can also contact them on the website for a free sample.
As far as the glasses go....they need to allow for air circulation between your forehead and the frame a your cheek and the lens.

bubbaPDX
11-02-2009, 02:12 PM
You mention you wear prescription glasses. Are you just wearing your regular glasses or do you have a prescription insert the attaches to sport eye wear?

If you are wearing you basic daily wear glasses you may want to consider sports specific glasses that promote air circulation.

And if all else fails you can go my route. Contact lenses. Even if the glasses fog, you can take them off and maintain clear vision.

I'm wearing prescription sports glasses (polycarbonate lenses) with some -- but not tremendous -- ventilation. Good enough, however, that they stay (fairly) clear while in motion. And they keep just enough wind out of my eyes to keep me from crying all the time.

Contacts would be a quantum leap for me. We'll see how desperate I become.

biciclero
11-03-2009, 12:43 PM
I tried the drop of liquid dish soap this morning--worked great! I only put it on the insides of my lenses, and had no problems. The only issue is that it makes my lenses slightly more "reflecty"; I get a little bit more glare back from the insides of the lenses. Still, fogging impairs visibility way more than a little glare-back.

bubbaPDX
11-04-2009, 08:30 AM
I tried the drop of liquid dish soap this morning--worked great! I only put it on the insides of my lenses, and had no problems. The only issue is that it makes my lenses slightly more "reflecty"; I get a little bit more glare back from the insides of the lenses. Still, fogging impairs visibility way more than a little glare-back.

Did you buff it off, let it dry, something in-between? As I understand, Cat Crap is a soap-like substance (feels like dried-up dishwashing liquid)... still, I'm overwhelming it on the inside inner edges, by my nose. Even on a gorgeous morning like this.

I'm eager to try your method! Thanks!

biciclero
11-04-2009, 05:38 PM
I just put a small drop on each lens, smeared it around to cover the surface, and then polished with a clean cloth until it was clear. I had to find new clean spots on my cloth every so often (I probably used too much soap to start with). It can be a little tricky to get the edges of the lenses, depending on the construction of your frames. I haven't tried it on my sunglasses yet, for that very reason. The lenses of my sunglasses are recessed pretty far into the inside edges of the frames, making a "corner" that is hard to get into. One thing that I am wondering about (time will tell) is whether soap-treated lenses tend to attract more dirt/dust then untreated. Even if so, soap ought to wash off easily enough...

Really the slight extra glare is the worst problem I've had. I also have very basic plastic lenses; they have no anti-glare or other surface treatments. I don't know whether applying straight soap and leaving it on the lens would have any ill effects on such treatments.

bubbaPDX
01-20-2010, 01:20 PM
http://www.motosolutions.com/
The make a decent solution for the inside and another for the outside of lenses. REI and Cycle Gear (motorcycle retailer) sell their products. You can also contact them on the website for a free sample.
As far as the glasses go....they need to allow for air circulation between your forehead and the frame a your cheek and the lens.

After experimenting with soap, Cat Crap, etc., I picked up a 5-pack of FogTech at REI (http://www.rei.com/brand/FogTech). With the first application, I got approx. 2-3 days of no fogging. It appears to work, and I'll keep torture-testing it in the meantime.

Thanks for the tip!

Oldguyonabike
01-25-2012, 08:28 AM
Greetings!
I'm resurrecting this post because I was talking to motorist co-worker who told me about using RainX on her windshield and how the water just slid off.

I've tried just about everything (catcrap, baby shampoo, special "anti-fog" ski formulas, you name it) and had not found anything that would bear up against riding in the Oregon liquid sunshine. Though not perfect, RainX works better than anything I've tried. Glasses still fog when I stop, but I can see when riding. There is another product called FogX that I haven't tried yet. Its going to take me a long time, though, to use up what may be a lifetime bottle I got from O'Reilly's Autoparts for $7.95.