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View Full Version : pondering single-speed conversion for 70s Pug


bubbaPDX
02-23-2009, 01:02 PM
I'm recently arrived to PDX (last June), and inherited an early-70s Peugeot tourer in the process. It incorporates a number of features from the UO-8 and UE-8:

http://cyclespeugeot.com/images/1970_s_Canadian-early_UO8.jpg
http://cyclespeugeot.com/images/1970_s_Canadian-early_UE8.jpg

This was a mass-produced model and, best I can tell, is not particularly precious or collectible. What's remarkable about my example is that it is squeaky-clean, almost 100% original, with practically no wear or tear. You could eat off of the steel rims (27x1.25).

To that end, I'm pondering a "non-destructive" single-speed conversion, retaining as many of the fully-functional original components as possible. Replacement wheels (700c) will be needed. Sheldon Brown's web resources are duly noted.

However, Gentle Readers, what are your thoughts on local resources for this kind of project? Thanks!

hemp22
02-23-2009, 01:45 PM
sounds like a fun project.
Why do you see the replacement wheels being needed? It may be possible to keep your wheels & convert the rear cassette to a single speed freewheel with just spacers.
But, if you want a fixed gear or flip flop, then yes, you'll need new hubs.

If you switch from 27in to 700c rims, be aware that you might need new brake calipers due to the difference in reach.

Otherwise, that conversion should be pretty easy.
For parts, etc, City Bikes is a good resource.

bubbaPDX
02-23-2009, 03:32 PM
Thanks much for the feedback. Here's where you can verify or dispel whether the original chromed steel rims would be awful for wet braking. I hear that they're bad news in the wet, so I was bracing to switch over to alloy rims (700c would afford a few more tire choices than 27", I'm thinking). I'd love to go sturdy and low-dollar, if possible.

The original Mafac Racer center-pulls look like they have another 1/2" of travel in the shoe adjustment, so I think they'll have enough reach.

My plan would be to archive the original wheels, derailer and other bits so a motivated archaeologist could put it all together again, if need be.

And I look forward to my first visit to City Bikes!

sounds like a fun project.
Why do you see the replacement wheels being needed? It may be possible to keep your wheels & convert the rear cassette to a single speed freewheel with just spacers.
But, if you want a fixed gear or flip flop, then yes, you'll need new hubs.

If you switch from 27in to 700c rims, be aware that you might need new brake calipers due to the difference in reach.

Otherwise, that conversion should be pretty easy.
For parts, etc, City Bikes is a good resource.

fredlf
02-25-2009, 03:45 PM
If you're replacing wheels, make sure you know what the hub spacing is. On a bike of this vintage it will be narrower than modern hubs. IME you can "cold-set" a frame out 5mm or so (using Sheldon's instructions), but more than that is not a good idea.

And yeah, those Mafac racers on chrome rims were horrible. I rode a Peugeot all through high school in Indiana and it was an adventure going downhill in that lovely midwestern weather.

bubbaPDX
03-09-2009, 09:46 AM
I'm recently arrived to PDX (last June), and inherited an early-70s Peugeot UO-8 tourer in the process.

This was a mass-produced model and, best I can tell, is not particularly precious or collectible. What's remarkable about my example is that it is squeaky-clean, almost 100% original, with practically no wear or tear. You could eat off of the steel rims (27x1.25).

To that end, I'm pondering a "non-destructive" single-speed conversion, retaining as many of the fully-functional original components as possible. Replacement wheels (700c) will be needed.

The starting point:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/SbR0sDeEXuI/AAAAAAAAABg/J3BdEpihuIc/s320/IMG_0535.JPG (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/SbR0sDeEXuI/AAAAAAAAABg/J3BdEpihuIc/s1600-h/IMG_0535.JPG)

The mid-point:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/SbR2FgSAu7I/AAAAAAAAABw/IIDB0sajETc/s320/IMG_0546.JPG (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/SbR2FgSAu7I/AAAAAAAAABw/IIDB0sajETc/s1600-h/IMG_0546.JPG)

Two-thirds of the way there (used 700c wheels and new rear freewheel from Sellwood Cycle Repair (http://sellwoodcycle.com/consignment.htm)):
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/SbR3o9u-rJI/AAAAAAAAAB4/SbF0-Kezrl0/s320/IMG_0547.JPG (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/SbR3o9u-rJI/AAAAAAAAAB4/SbF0-Kezrl0/s1600-h/IMG_0547.JPG)

Did a chop-flop on the existing drop bars (so much for the "non-destructive" conversion). Hope to snag a used saddle and brake levers at City Cycles.

Reverse chronology here (http://chunkybits.blogspot.com/).

bubbaPDX
03-16-2009, 11:18 AM
Had a very pleasant experience at City Bikes, where I scored an old Selle Royal saddle and a pair of old Mafac levers. Installed everything, adjusted brakes, and took her out between rain showers on Sunday.

Damned if it doesn't all work! I'd say I made it to third base on the first time at bat.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/Sb1WMkuj6CI/AAAAAAAAACo/BXOHWCgFItc/s320/IMG_0560.JPG (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/Sb1WMkuj6CI/AAAAAAAAACo/BXOHWCgFItc/s1600-h/IMG_0560.JPG)

Driveline is gratifyingly quiet; however, a periodic ping in the BB suggests it could use some grease and attention, which will also afford me some "quality time" with my cottered crank, I guess.

Otherwise, at 25 lbs the bike climbs, cruises and stops nicely. With some tweaks to bar and saddle height -- and some fenders and bar tape -- it should be good to go. Fun project! :D

hemp22
03-16-2009, 01:02 PM
Congrats! it looks like a beauty. Makes me wish I could inherit/find another old 10-speed to play with

bubbaPDX
05-18-2009, 09:26 AM
Pug's on the road, just in time for spring. Algae and duck poo contrast nicely with the gleaming alloy in the photos. Will trim brake cables after break-in.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/ShC2GwwSYYI/AAAAAAAAADA/UVUDOD0eomA/s320/IMG_0623.JPG (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/ShC2GwwSYYI/AAAAAAAAADA/UVUDOD0eomA/s1600-h/IMG_0623.JPG)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/ShC1-L6UC_I/AAAAAAAAAC4/8El8GEGDm1E/s320/IMG_0622.JPG (http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/ShC1-L6UC_I/AAAAAAAAAC4/8El8GEGDm1E/s1600-h/IMG_0622.JPG)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/ShC6bXxkLuI/AAAAAAAAADQ/VaoTTHzyk2g/s320/IMG_0621.JPG (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_nEUeCzLtb3k/ShC6bXxkLuI/AAAAAAAAADQ/VaoTTHzyk2g/s1600-h/IMG_0621.JPG)

All original, save for:

-- used 700c wheels, new Panaracer Kevlars and brake cables from Sellwood Cycle (http://sellwoodcycle.com/merchandise.htm);

-- vintage Atax Philippe stem and city bar (perfect fit, from Cyclart (http://www.cyclart.com/CyclMarket.html));

-- aluminum fenders, brass bell, foam/cork grips, and inverse brake levers from Velo Orange (http://www.velo-orange.com/);

-- used saddle and new set post (sanded to fit) from City Bikes (http://www.citybikes.coop/);

-- Performance TransIt seat post rack; and

-- Cateye blinkies and toe clips from inventory.

hemp22
05-18-2009, 10:56 AM
looks great!
you'll have to check back in with feedback on how that brake lever setup is working for you. it's an interesting bar/lever combination, so i'm wondering how comfortable it is.

bubbaPDX
05-18-2009, 11:13 AM
looks great!
you'll have to check back in with feedback on how that brake lever setup is working for you. it's an interesting bar/lever combination, so i'm wondering how comfortable it is.

Thanks for the encouragement! I've ridden about 100 miles, and I'm running the brakes as "tight" as possible (good thing the rims are straight) and adjusting weekly as the new cables stretch a bit. Performance is good enough, but not great at this point. Lever feel is nice when everything is tight and adjusted.

The French city bars are brilliant. Very comfortable, neutral position. Standing in the pedals while climbing was odd at first, because your hands are back closer to your knees. Nothing knocks or rubs though.