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View Full Version : Tubus or Surly Nice Rear Rack?


vja4Him
02-20-2009, 09:17 PM
Does anyone have experience with either the Tubus rear rack, and/or the Surly Nice rear rack? I'm still trying to decide which one to get ....

Philosophography
02-22-2009, 09:05 AM
I think you should consider Old Man Mountain racks. I have the Cold Springs version and I think they're the cat's meow. They're light and super strong. The only really compelling thing about the Surly is that it's made of steel, so it is very easily repairable, but not light.

bikieboy
02-22-2009, 10:50 AM
i was going to suggest the Nitto rack, which is beautiful, until i checked the price it's going for these days...fuggedaboudit. costs nearly 50% more than the Surly or Tubus.

vja4Him
02-22-2009, 12:20 PM
I think you should consider Old Man Mountain racks. I have the Cold Springs version and I think they're the cat's meow. They're light and super strong. The only really compelling thing about the Surly is that it's made of steel, so it is very easily repairable, but not light.

What kind of weight difference are we talking about here?

scholzj
02-22-2009, 05:20 PM
look at Axium racks. I have one that I love, it is light (~500g), strong (130lb weight capacity) and was only $35. I have the streamliner sport tour model, but the odyssey is easier to find and stronger. They are made in BC so sort of local. anywho, my two cents.

Philosophography
02-22-2009, 05:29 PM
What kind of weight difference are we talking about here?

The Surly would be more than twice the weight of the OMM. They're both rated to carry about the same amount, but the OMM seems stronger. If you put on front and back, the Surly would be about five and a half pounds. The OMM, less than two and a half. It's just aluminum vs steel.

vja4Him
02-23-2009, 07:45 AM
look at Axium racks. I have one that I love, it is light (~500g), strong (130lb weight capacity) and was only $35. I have the streamliner sport tour model, but the odyssey is easier to find and stronger. They are made in BC so sort of local. anywho, my two cents.

Do you have a link for that rack? The strongest Axiom rear rack that I can find has a weight limit of only 75 pounds. I thought the Surly and Tubus had the highest weight limits, at around 90 pounds.

zpl
02-23-2009, 08:39 AM
Do you have a link for that rack? The strongest Axiom rear rack that I can find has a weight limit of only 75 pounds. I thought the Surly and Tubus had the highest weight limits, at around 90 pounds.

If you're planning to carry more than 50 pounds of cargo on a bike for a long-distance tour, I'd recommend considering a BOB trailer rather than trying to carry all of that on a rack.

Scott

vja4Him
02-23-2009, 08:47 AM
If you're planning to carry more than 50 pounds of cargo on a bike for a long-distance tour, I'd recommend considering a BOB trailer rather than trying to carry all of that on a rack.

Scott

I actually plan on getting the Bob. Still trying to decide which one, either the Ibex or Yak?

When I do any bike camping/touring, I plan on carrying everything on the bike, but will try to keep the camping gear under 50-60 pounds.

There will be times when I will be shopping and carry 70 pounds or more. I just want to make sure that I have heavy-duty racks that will easily support plenty of weight. I don't want to get a rack that is rated for 50 pounds, and then starts to bend/break if I carry a few extra pounds (say 60-70).

I know there are some very strong racks out there! I've seen people carry enormous weight on their bicycles, sometimes even mind boggling weights!!!

bonny790
02-25-2009, 04:19 PM
I only have experience with cheap aluminum racks and my current rear surly. My aluminum ones have worn grooves from the bag hardware, not too cool in my book. The surly is sweet, very sturdy, fully adjustable, and has a nice wide platform for strapping stuff to, adding to it's versatility. Between a steel bike, steel rack, giant ass front Wald steel basket and bags chock full of school books, 2+ lbs is just the difference of bringing the thermos or not. That is to say, I don't care about the weight :D Not cheap, but great value, imho.

the Wumpus
02-27-2009, 10:01 AM
It's not the rack, beyond a certain point. It's those two five millimeter screws you're bouncing around the entire load on, where you attach the rear rack to the dropouts.

I like steel racks. Racks do pivot around under loads while riding, and I've cracked a couple of old aluminum racks. Also - I go out and find grade 8 screws to attach the things with, run a tap through the dropout threads to clean out any crud or paint, use loctite, a nyloc nut on the opposite side of the dropout, and a washer on each side which I can poke to see if anything's come even the slightest bit loose. Washer moves under the bolt/nut, something's loose. The nut helps lock the screw in place, and takes some of the load off the dropout threads. Sure it takes me half an hour to bolt on a rack, but I've never had one come loose when I've done this.

biciclero
02-27-2009, 11:20 AM
Get your minds out of the gutter, you know what I mean.:D The whole load-bearing apparatus is a chain of many links: rack + rack mounting + frame + hub + spokes + rim. For the strongest setup, pay attention to the weakest link. For a long time, my weakest link was a worn-out rim + spokes. Also don't forget that the rear wheel not only holds up what you have on your rack, but also supports most of your body weight as well.

the Wumpus
02-27-2009, 12:19 PM
Oh yeah... I forget about wheels. After I started popping spokes the year before last, I had Universal Cycles put together a Velocity Dyad rim, 36 DT Swiss butted spokes, brass nipples, and a bulky Tiagra hub. Trued them up after one month, and haven't had to touch them since.

Philosophography
02-28-2009, 10:35 AM
I love the new DT Swiss Alpine spokes that I just got--triple butted with massive tops, but still normal weight.

The OMM racks connect with a huge aluminum bracket that goes around an extra-long wheel skewer running through the wheel hub. There is no little bolt or dropout eyelet. They're really strong. You can see it here: http://www.oldmanmountain.com/Pages/RackPages/RackGalleries/Pages/csRear_gallery.htm

scholzj
03-04-2009, 09:24 AM
The axiom odyssey is rated at 50kg, which is 110lbs. I am pretty sure that I saw it for sale at bike gallery, and we carry it at the Newberg Bike Shoppe where I work. their web site is www.axiomgear.com

Philosophography
03-04-2009, 04:54 PM
That axiom is a really nice rack. What do you think of this discussion of the weakest link? If you put a high-rated rack on a low rated bolt, the end result is a broken bolt, isn't it? :?: