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K'Tesh
12-20-2008, 12:14 AM
Using the plans from momentumplanet.com (http://www.momentumplanet.com/), I'm making my own DIY Studded Bike Tires (http://www.momentumplanet.com/components/diy-winterizing-studded-tires).

In a quirk of fate, I just happen to have the same style of Bontrager tires as they have in their photo:

http://www.momentumplanet.com/files/imagecache/lead-small/images/lead/studded_tire.jpg (http://www.momentumplanet.com/components/diy-winterizing-studded-tires) http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3263/3130445042_651761bb4f.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/ufobike/3130445042/)
Momentumplanet's and Mine

The major difference between their project, and mine is that my tires are new. I've been using slicks from day one on my bikes, but I had kept the tires for some reason... Now I know why.

Looking forward to getting it up and running soon. Photos pending...

Rubberside Down!
K'Tesh

MrWolf
12-20-2008, 06:54 AM
i purchased my studded tires from westernbikeworks.com, their located here in pdx, around i205 and columbia blvd. i purchased them after the last major storm of 04. this is what they got listed currently for studded tires.

http://www.westernbikeworks.com/productdetail.asp?ss=4812&p=IKSFS

i am intrested to see how your tires work out, keep us posted.

briandlacy
12-22-2008, 04:05 AM
A repeat post from a sister page at this forum - but toipcally relevant

Snow riding tips

I love to ride in most snow - and did for years in Michigan. The crusty stuff that we now have in pdx (as of Sunday pm) is a hard fight. The crust forces the front wheel to the side to much to keep enough forward speed - wants to turn too much Finding slopes of soft snow to slalom down was a hoot. BUT – in terms of equipment and handling these are my tips:
Handling –
1. Snow over 32 degrees gets very slippery very quickly. Ice w little or no snow over it will be more slippery too. See below for testing slip.
2. 26x1 3/8 or equivalent metric (35mm) are a good width.
3. Keep enough weight over the front so front wheel holds the line you want (at least more or less – a bit of snow wobble makes the ride exciting). Most weight will be in the back to keep up your speed. Avoid going too slow that you have to stop, start, stop, start. Get a good tempo going and try hard to keep it up.
4. The deeper the snow – the lower the gears.
5. Try to follow (depending on snow depth) car tracks. It’s easier - just like xc skiing.
6. Lower your seat so it’s easier to touch the ground
7. Test the snow’s ‘slipperiness’ very early in the ride and when you’re going fairly slow and straight. Do this by gently and quickly waggling front wheel left to right a little bit to see whether front wheel wants to turn left tor right, just wants to dump you, or some in between reaction. Increase the amount of side to side waggle until you find that point where “x” amount of a turn will make the front wheel start to slide.
8. Avoid braking w the front unless really needed - and based on your slip test.
9. When taking a left turn (for example – reverse instructions for right hand turn), lean your upper body over to the left, so when you turn your bar. The bike is as fully upright as possible. This makes the bike press down vs. to the side/to the right of your line, which makes a huge difference whether you fall or not.
10. Keep your feet ready to fly down to the ground
11. Let your front wheel ‘find’ its way a bit, a soft touch on the handle bar in most snow will help. keep lots of power (not so much as to cause slipping though) coming from the rear wheel, and gently guide the front where you want to go

Tire traction

For caliper-braked bikes: get an older tire and drill 3/4 inches from the tire's center line holes 2” apart to put in ½" screws (ointy is good, but more dangerous for nearby mammals) w very broad and flat heads (to cut the odds of a puncture). Place a strip of duct tape all around on the inside to put a smooth barrier between the screw head and the top of your tube. No need to over inflate. Slightly squishy is good.

Disc braked bikes: let out most of the air, put on lots of big zip ties with the zip tie 'knot' near the contact patch, nylon rope (wrapping in a spiral all around and tying off tightly), metal chains could hurt your rims – I don’t advise them. Inflate your tires and check for a snug fit. Or use the screws approach from above.

Final note – if you’d like me to coach you and yours in these techniques – send me a note and let’s get a class together. Brian @ brian@bikempowered.com

LESTER
12-22-2008, 06:38 PM
I was riding with 1/2" spikes on my front tire,
Plain 2.1" knobby on the back.

Some areas were packed snow or ice, which was great. The spikes were a little bumpy on the ice, but held well there and ruled the packed snow.

Some areas had untracked snow of about 4" over packed snow from earlier, still not bad. I find untracked snow my favorite to ride in, especially the light powder that's around at the moment. More typical Cascade Cement ain't nearly as nice.

Some areas just had a couple inches of churned snow, which was terrible.

MrWolf
12-23-2008, 03:17 AM
my experience has been interesting with the studded tires i have. where i live its basically packed snow with a sheet of ice on top, so gaining traction with the studded tires was good providing i kept the weight on the back. when i was riding downtown, the churned stuff from all the cars made it tough to ride but the packed snow was great to ride on. also un-tracked snow was great to ride on. overall riding downtown was not a cup of tea and will be intresting this weekend on how the snow and weather turn out. for this considering going out there with your bike, DON'T DO IT!!! with the snow drifts up to a foot plus deep, it makes it severely dangerous to ride. if tri-met bus's are getting stuck, then the odds are in your favor of getting stuck and having to push your bike out of deep snow. only go out if absolutely necessary and take very easy, slow and safe.

K'Tesh
12-23-2008, 10:57 AM
I was riding with 1/2" spikes on my front tire,
Plain 2.1" knobby on the back.

Some areas were packed snow or ice, which was great. The spikes were a little bumpy on the ice, but held well there and ruled the packed snow.

Some areas had untracked snow of about 4" over packed snow from earlier, still not bad. I find untracked snow my favorite to ride in, especially the light powder that's around at the moment. More typical Cascade Cement ain't nearly as nice.

Some areas just had a couple inches of churned snow, which was terrible.

MrWolf,

First, Welcome to the forums...

To answer your question... take the above comment and replace 1/2" with 3/8" and you've got a perfect example of my experiences to date.

I decided to give up on the rear tire and went with another mtn bike tire I had laying around.

I rode this morning to catch the bus, only to find it was canceled, when I went to catch the MAX (then try to catch the route 12) things were so packed, I opted not to even try with the bike. I took it home, walked back.

On the final leg of my journey I ended up walking nearly a mile (mostly downhill, which I find more painful) and finally got to work 2 hours late.

I hurt... ouch...
K'Tesh

MrWolf
12-26-2008, 03:24 AM
thanks tesh, its nice to be able to post now.
as for your commute, i know feeling. sunday i was late by an hr for work due to trimet and i had my bike with me. was no easy ride either going from max stop to work down front ave. at least your only bruised. you could be busted up and not able to ride at all. just think, we now have 4 yrs to prepare for next major snow fall. (if pattern holds true)