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hillbillyhoedown
08-13-2008, 04:41 PM
I want to build/ have built a touring/daily commuter bike. As far as that goes what components should I use? My friend has a Burley Hudson and it has XTR as a rear derailleur, should I go with Mtn bike components? I have a full Ultegra group (9speed) from a previous bike, could I use that, or are road components not a good idea? What would be the pros and cons of each choice? What about hubs/rims? I know what I would like as far as frame and fork, and I have a stem and bars that should work. It's the first step into custom world for me so I need help.

I would like to keep cost to a minimum. What parts from my road bike could be reused? The headset, BB? Again, I don't know much about this, so thanks in advance.

JeffW
08-13-2008, 05:02 PM
The Rivendell folks have an article about their opinion. You might want to take a look at it: http://www.rivbike.com/article/components/opinions_about_bike_parts (Note: It appears their site is down at the moment, but you can read it from Google's cache here (http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:H6T-tbK21bcJ:www.rivbike.com/article/components/opinions_about_bike_parts+site:rivbike.com+rivende ll+bikes&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=30&gl=us).)

vincentpaul
08-13-2008, 06:29 PM
The Rivendell folks have an article about their opinion. You might want to take a look at it: http://www.rivbike.com/article/components/opinions_about_bike_parts (Note: It appears their site is down at the moment, but you can read it from Google's cache here (http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:H6T-tbK21bcJ:www.rivbike.com/article/components/opinions_about_bike_parts+site:rivbike.com+rivende ll+bikes&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=30&gl=us).)

I'd forgotten about that article. I pretty much sums up the bike industry. Most everything works. Almost nothing you can buy will effect your performance. Bike technology hasn't changed significantly in 100 years. It still takes a cyclist to make the wheels go round faster.

hillbillyhoedown
08-13-2008, 07:39 PM
Thanks for the response. Awesome article, by the way, as well as their other articles!They'll totally help out.

All I wanted to know was if mtn bike derailers are better or if road parts are better functionally on a touring bike. My friends has mtn bike parts, and so it made me curious. The group is unimportant to me also, I just mentioned my Ultegra parts because I have them, and if they will perform well in a touring capacity, not just racing or whatever, I would rather use them as opposed to buying new stuff (that goes for whatever else I have already and could use too!)

Thanks again!

djasonpenney
08-13-2008, 07:45 PM
...move along now...

Seriously, I prefer components on my daily bike that don't scream STEAL ME. My winter rat cost me $85 and about 80 hours of wrenching when I was unemployed to get running. $25 was a new freewheel because I had to go to the LBS to have the old one removed and I wanted one I could remove with my own tools. The rest involved cables, housing, bearings, and new rubber.

I do think the short gearing (mountain bike) makes sense on a commuter. You're more interested in being comfortable than breaking into a sweat. Similarly, if you're doing touring, you're not going to be exactly light: that eleven tooth cog isn't going to get much use.

I've seen references that suggest that you even uglify the frame with nail polish and other junk to make the bike look even less attractive.

lynnef
08-13-2008, 10:01 PM
you'll be happier with MTB components when you are touring and carrying stuff. Less walking up hills, more riding :)

My go-to bike has a basic square taper bottom bracket, a Sugino triple crank (48/36/26), an IRD 8 speed cassette, and Shimano Deore front (old) and rear (new) derailleurs. And Shimano Dura-Ace bar-end shifters. Not a high-priced drivetrain by any means, and very functional.

Or, to quote friend Michael: "you could pull STUMPS with that!". Exactly the point. Well, Michael could pull stumps with it anyway.

The whole drivetrain cost less than a set of Ultegra brifters. Parts were from an old bike, eBay, and Rivendell.

(It is much prettier than Jason's bike. Much, much prettier.)

hillbillyhoedown
08-14-2008, 06:47 AM
Cool! Thanks, that's the kind of advice I was hoping for. I have a decommissioned Mtn Bike (need to get fork rebuilt/replaced :( ) so mabye I could cannibalize it too! Could I steal the cassette and cranks too? Anything to drop the price of the bike I want to build down from the quote of $1700 (too much for me to afford.) Now to find room to store torn down bikes and parts....

lynnef
08-14-2008, 09:47 AM
Cool! Thanks, that's the kind of advice I was hoping for. I have a decommissioned Mtn Bike (need to get fork rebuilt/replaced :( ) so mabye I could cannibalize it too! Could I steal the cassette and cranks too? Anything to drop the price of the bike I want to build down from the quote of $1700 (too much for me to afford.) Now to find room to store torn down bikes and parts....

Cranks - probably. Just make sure you've got a compatible bottom bracket. Cassette - has to work with your hub, so check that.

Torn down bikes and parts are stored in baskets in the living room, didn't you know? Just put a sheet of plastic on the carpet under your workstand :)

fredlf
08-14-2008, 01:53 PM
In general, you can mix and match Shimano MTB and road components without problems. Sometimes (e.g. chain and cluster) you need parts that are compatible in terms of cogs in the cluster (e.g. you can't use a 7sp chain on a 10sp cluster). And of course there are different kinds of cranks and bb's, etc, etc. But it's all pretty common sense. Don't forget the awesome, late Sheldon Brown's many, many pages of help at Harris Cyclery's website. If Sheldon can't help you get a bike together, you can't be helped!

The Ultegra stuff will work great on a touring/commuter (it's what's on my touring/commuter). Just throw on a long-cage MTB rear derailleur and wide range MTB cluster if you don't have a triple. Ultegra bar-end shifters are very simple and reliable (yay for friction on the front der!) and can usually be found on super-sale at the end of triathlon season.