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brewcaster
08-11-2008, 11:41 AM
I don't want to jinx us into the rainy season early, but I am wanting to prepare for my first winter as a cycling commuter.

I think I got what I need for shells, but I was wanting some advice on shoes.

I don't use any foot locking schtuff, so I am looking for just some great lightweight and as waterproof as you can get shoes. I plan on changing shoes at work, but would love to not have to change socks. Any advice?

And no, I will not get into the world of clipless or cages, thanks.

bonny790
08-11-2008, 12:37 PM
Insulated and water repellent hiking boots, make sure there's enough room to double up on wool (not cotton) socks. I have suede REI boots that have minimal seams and I clean and treat them a couple times a year and they work fantastic.

brewcaster
08-11-2008, 12:59 PM
Boots? How does that feel? My first thought is that you need more flex in your ankle?

toddwaddell
08-11-2008, 01:08 PM
Brewcaster,

Very much on the + side of clipless, your feed don't slip off the pedals after your shoes and the pedals get wet.

brewcaster
08-11-2008, 01:25 PM
I don't want to get off topic.

Cruizer
08-11-2008, 01:35 PM
I use some Keen slip-on boots I got at REI -- not biking specific, with wool socks inside. I transition to thicker socks as the weather gets colder. If you go with wool socks, however, you will want to change into regular socks at work, otherwise your feet will get hot during the day, sweat, and set you up for very cold feet on the ride home.

We are lucky to live in Portland because all you need is fenders, lights, and lightweight breathable/water-shedding clothes and you can bike commute throughout the winter, as long as you figure out how to keep your hands and feet warm.

fredlf
08-11-2008, 01:59 PM
For the coldest, wettest days, a pair of polypro liner sox with plastic produce bags over them and warm wool socks on the outside. The plastic bags keep out wind and lock in warmth, but they will make your feet sweat so the polypro liners are a must.

djasonpenney
08-11-2008, 02:00 PM
I've been riding in the rain for years now, and your best bet is to get something that dries out quickly.

I know you don't want to digress into the cleat argument, but please do keep in mind that the risk of slipping your foot off of the pedal is greater in the rain.

(Reluctantly) leaving that point aside, I have a Teva-like sandal (made by Shimano) that has been my trusty shoe in almost every weather condition for almost ten years. With an optional neoprene bootie cover for rain and warmth, you can wear this in just about any weather here in Portland. (I've even worn this when riding through ice, but all my friends are quick to point out I'm little tetched in the head.)

The benefit of this setup is that everything dries quickly. By the time you need to leave at the end of the day, your shoes will be dry again, whereas if you have canvas or leather, they'll be damp at least until the next morning.

Note that Keene makes an absolutely fabulous cycling sandal now, so you can even appear stylish. And yes, since both the Shimano and Keene are "mountain bike" style, you can use them without any sort of cleats. (Would you consider toe clips at the least, please?)

bonny790
08-11-2008, 02:16 PM
It does feel different at first, but you learn quickly how to tie them so they are comfortable for riding and walking. You do, however, want them tall enough so that your pant legs cover the top so water doesn't come in, because then it's all for nothing as your feet will get soaked that way. Wet pedals will cause a lot of sliding around as was mentioned, but the lugs from the boots will keep it to a minimum.

With the socks, I use some light weight Smartwool (yes, they're pricey, but they last an amazing long time!) as a base layer then some heavier wools on top and not worry about it all day. One of the nice things about wool is that it insulates well when wet. I've never had a problem with sweaty feet being colder unless they're cotton socks, completely different story. But, with the lighter base pair on, you could just strip off the outer layer when you remove the boots at work.

brettoo
08-11-2008, 02:44 PM
This comes up here every year, though usually not this far in advance. good planning! For additional good advice to what's offered here, check these threads and others like them, or just do a search for "rain" or "neoprene" or such.

http://bikeportland.org/forum/showthread.php?t=1192
http://bikeportland.org/forum/showthread.php?t=376
http://bikeportland.org/forum/showthread.php?t=1430

brewcaster
08-11-2008, 02:55 PM
I have rode in rain already. My feet slipping off pedal has not been an issue. My pedal has pretty sharp spikes on it, that have gripped all my shoes well. But thank you for your concern. I would rather be able to get my foot off faster, and be able to ride even if I don't have my cleated shoes. I understand some will disagree, but that is OK, diversity is welcome.

Duncan
08-12-2008, 07:52 AM
in the winter I use vasque sundowners (shoebuy.com) and goretex gators and my feet never get wet.

I would however plan on changing socks because in the winter you will want heavier socks for the ride then indoors.

I dont use clip-ins either- they make me uncomfortable and I am the kind of guy who would forget to unclip and fall over at stop light.:cool:

vincentpaul
08-13-2008, 12:06 AM
I have rode in rain already. My feet slipping off pedal has not been an issue. My pedal has pretty sharp spikes on it, that have gripped all my shoes well. But thank you for your concern. I would rather be able to get my foot off faster, and be able to ride even if I don't have my cleated shoes. I understand some will disagree, but that is OK, diversity is welcome.

+1 on skipping bike shoes. I prefer good trail running shoes w/ as little leather as possible. (I like Asics). Two pair of good wool socks, two pair of insoles as well. Remove the morning insoles while the outer shoe dries. Insoles and socks never seem to dry during the work day when its really wet out, thus 2 pairs of each.