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View Full Version : Getting a new bike, anyone own or ride a surly?


bikerinNE
12-20-2007, 10:57 PM
The time has come to retire my beloved vintage Trek touring bike. I've been looking for over a year at which bike I want to use. I commute to and from work every day, i don't own a vehicle, the bicycle is my only mode of transportation.

I've owned those carbon fiber racing bikes, hybrids, and of course the old Mt. bikes. This Trek, which was a hand me down has been my favorite by far, i personally like steel after having ridden this bike for over 2 years now.

I've looked at all of them, and I've pretty much have decided to go with the Surly Cross Check. has anyone here had a good, bad, or impartial experiences with this bike?

Thanks.

nuovorecord
12-21-2007, 09:01 AM
I don't own a Surly, but I've built up a couple. My impression is that they're well-made bikes and a great value. They're especially good for commuting since they have plenty of tire clearance so you can run larger rubber and still have room to put fenders on it. Their geometry is relaxed so they're stable and comfortable to ride.

If you liked your Trek touring bike, had you considered a Surly Long Haul Trucker, their touring frame? It might work better if you have a rack installed, using panniers, etc.

Regardless, Surly's are good frames - you won't be sorry if you get one.

shhambo
12-21-2007, 10:12 AM
I have a crosscheck with a triple ring and panniers for touring. I love it.
I got the crosscheck over the long-haul because I use it as a commuter bike as well. Good luck

mizake
12-21-2007, 12:38 PM
I've got a Surly Karate Monkey and my significant other's got a Long Haul Trucker. Both frames are well-made and strong. Another guy at my work has a long haul and he's in love with it. Highly recommended and a good value to boot.

Miguelaron
12-21-2007, 01:33 PM
i've converted my steamroller into a big-tired, fender equipped singlespeed commuter. i never really liked the fixed gear thing, but singlespeed is my style. not a whole lot to maintain (oil in chain and freewheel) and no gears to think about. i ride 48-17 and that works pretty well for my 7.5 mile commute to/from work.

in the summer i will remove the rear brake, big tires, and fenders, go back to riser handlebars and have a sub-20lb. speed bike.

for $350 a surly frame is a fairly inexpensive answer to building a workhorse.

bp071117
12-21-2007, 04:52 PM
The time has come to retire my beloved vintage Trek touring bike.

Is there anything mechanically wrong with the Trek? If not, do you want to sell it? :) What's the year and frame size?

bikerinNE
12-21-2007, 05:53 PM
Is there anything mechanically wrong with the Trek? If not, do you want to sell it? :) What's the year and frame size?

Nothing wrong, but the bike and parts are about 30 years old. The bike was well maintained by the previous owner who toured with it across the US. It's going to need a bunch of maintenance, and I am keeping it. Retiring it, not replacing it. It's my favorite bike I've ever had, and it's taken me a long to to narrow down a my list to find a bike that i would enjoy riding every day.

I decided against the Long Haul Trucker because, it doesn't seem as versatile as the Cross Check. The Cross Check has room for both rack and fenders, which are a necessity on my bikes, as they are grocery getters, commuters, and for pleasure.

Thanks for all the info everyone.

scdurs
01-08-2008, 07:34 PM
I decided against the Long Haul Trucker because, it doesn't seem as versatile as the Cross Check. The Cross Check has room for both rack and fenders, which are a necessity on my bikes, as they are grocery getters, commuters, and for pleasure.

I bought a Surly LHT in November of 2007 and love it. Use it for commuting and have rack and fenders mounted on it. Don't know what you mean about the Cross Check being more versatile. It is actually worse for mounting a rack AND fenders as it only has single eyelets on the back, while the LHT has double eyelets for rack and fenders. I believe, however, that the Cross Check is lighter and might be better for recreational riding. Either one is a good choice in my book.

Have you considered keeping the Trek frame you love and putting all new components on it? That would be a cheaper route and you'd still have a bike that you know you will love.

misc.
01-22-2008, 09:45 PM
And I love it. It's a tank. The steel frame is a bit on the heavy side, but it handles everything. I don't stress jumping curbs, and the geometry is very stable.

lazlo
01-24-2008, 09:27 AM
I got a Cross Check complete as my commuter last summer, and I love it. I put fenders and a rear rack on, and use Ortlieb panniers. I did have some problem with heel strike, but once I got them dialed in it's not an issue. The one problem I do have is with toe overlap, but I've gotten used to it. I also looked at an LHT, but the wait time was significantly longer and I didn't want to wait.

maxadders
01-24-2008, 05:42 PM
I've been commuting on a Cross Check for about six months and I love it. I got the frame off craigslist for $200, a set of Salsa Delgado / XT wheels for $100 off CL as well, and the rest from here and there.

I've owned a few steel road frames in the past, but none with clearances allowing much more than 25c. My Cross Check's currently outfitted with 28c T-Serv Messenger tires, which have been quite excellent for these wet winter months.

I also own a Karate Monkey set up geared with a Reba fork in front. A blast to ride, but a real boatanchor on the scale.

lazlo
01-28-2008, 01:31 PM
scdurs: "Don't know what you mean about the Cross Check being more versatile. It is actually worse for mounting a rack AND fenders as it only has single eyelets on the back, while the LHT has double eyelets for rack and fenders."

Actually, the Cross Check has double eyelets on the back and single on the front. Easy to mount a rear rack and fenders.

scdurs
01-30-2008, 12:34 PM
And I love it. It's a tank. The steel frame is a bit on the heavy side, but it handles everything. I don't stress jumping curbs, and the geometry is very stable.

My Long Haul Trucker is a tank as well, but I love it. It has such a smooth ride its amazing. The long wheelbase keeps me from having heel strike and gives it a smooth ride. Maybe its smooth because it flattens the pavement as I ride... Someone else mentioned toe overlap, but I get that on most of my bikes, probably due to my big feet. If I get a bigger frame then I have top tube length issues that lead to neck and back pain issues. So I just deal with toe overlap.

Actually, I never really considered toe overlap an issue because I never turn that sharp at speed, anyway. The only time its an issue might be when one foot is on the ground, and I tend to have the pedal foot at bottom dead center in that case.

scdurs
01-30-2008, 12:36 PM
scdurs: "Don't know what you mean about the Cross Check being more versatile. It is actually worse for mounting a rack AND fenders as it only has single eyelets on the back, while the LHT has double eyelets for rack and fenders."

Actually, the Cross Check has double eyelets on the back and single on the front. Easy to mount a rear rack and fenders.

You're correct, the eyelet difference between the LHT and CC is on the fork where the LHT has two eyelets on each side.