PDA

View Full Version : Lights... What do You use? Why?


K'Tesh
10-16-2007, 09:28 AM
I'm surprised that there is no gear review forum here... so let's start one..

What do I use?
Personally I'm currently using 2 NR MiNewt X2's (one bar mounted and one helmet) and a NR TriNewt, as well as an older Cateye EL400 (as a backup should I find my other systems completly drained) for forward illumination.

For tail lights, I've got two Planet Bike Superflash lights (one on my backpack, one on the underseat bag), Planet Bike helmet mounted tail light, the NR Universal Tail Light (running off a 6V NR Evolution Smart battery), and
2 Performance ViewPoint tail lights (on the backpack).

I don't think I'll need any more lights for a while (Unless something breaks, then I'll fall back to my NR Evolution Smart systems).

Why? (sure there's legal requirements, but beyond that)

Me, I ride 24/7/365, I don't own a car, and I commute on Hwy 217 (yes, that's legal). I also do recreational riding year round, sometimes getting home several hours after dark. So, I need very powerful lights w/long run times. That, and I've been bounced off of cars twice this year http://bikeportland.org/forum/images/icons/icon9.gif once in daytime (8/17/7), once at 7pm in a parking lot (10/12/7). I'm not paranoid, they really do seem to be out to get me...

So, What do you use?

Keep on Riding
K'Tesh

http://www.geocities.com/ktesh_kag/UFOthreeviewsSMII.jpg
http://beam.to/ufobike

mizake
10-16-2007, 10:44 AM
I use the Light and Motion solo on my helmet. It has 3 hours run time that's more than enough for my work commute. It illuminates the springwater trail really well in complete darkness. I really like this light, and it's comparatively less expensive than the other light systems (they can get really pricey). In the past I've used the Niterider Road Rat (not bright enough) and the Niterider UltraFazer Max (total piece of crap: not nearly bright enough to illuminate the trail and fell apart in a few weeks). I've also briefly used the NiteHawk dual lighting system which I also found to be sub-par.

I'd appreciate any suggestions for a good tail light. I'd like to use just one. Cost is a factor.

For my rear light I use some piece of crap multi-flash mode light. I don't remember exactly who makes it, but I'll post that info when I have a chance to look at it as I would strongly advise against anyone purchasing it.

Oldguyonabike
10-16-2007, 11:36 AM
I use a Blackburn w/ NiCad batt pack that has a nice intense front beam that I feel safe with. I, too, use the rinky-dink $20 back lights.
During the Portland Century this was a guy that had the most intense back light I've ever seen. I asked him about it and he said he got it off the web for ~$100. COmpany starts with a "P" (I think). A lot of money for a back light, but I tell you this light was tiny and amazing. Anyone know what it is?

mizake
10-16-2007, 11:47 AM
I use a Blackburn w/ NiCad batt pack that has a nice intense front beam that I feel safe with. I, too, use the rinky-dink $20 back lights.
During the Portland Century this was a guy that had the most intense back light I've ever seen. I asked him about it and he said he got it off the web for ~$100. COmpany starts with a "P" (I think). A lot of money for a back light, but I tell you this light was tiny and amazing. Anyone know what it is?

I know Dinotte makes a totally badass rear light, but it MSRP is $169 which is too far above my price range: http://store.dinottelighting.com/shared/StoreFront/default.asp?CS=dinotte&StoreType=BtoC&Count1=765484035&Count2=682624459&ProductID=5&Target=products.asp

K'Tesh
10-16-2007, 12:08 PM
Planet Bike's Superflash is a very bright seemingly durable tail light, but I'd be careful w/them after changing the battery... I lost two of em's guts (battery, electronics, and lenses) perhaps from being bumped around on the seat pack. I now think that I have the thing fairly securely mounted (w/rubberbands to prevent loss, should it try to go AWOL. My LBS replaced both as I had them for only a short time. Costs about $22... two settings, flash, and steady... switch is mounted on the bottom (so water drips away).

Oldguyonabike
10-16-2007, 01:00 PM
Thanks mizake. That may be it. I remember it being real small and laying horizontally strapped to the underside of his saddle kit. $169 IS steep for a rear light.
Speaking of rear lights I went through 2 Blackburn rear lights. I really liked the brightness. Problem was the plastic hook that secured it to my saddle kit broke on two models. Regular city street riding. Maybe something about one curb bump I slowly go over (no jumping) to cut through Clackamas Town Center and a quick jar from that. But nothing radical that should have broken it. Boooooo on Bike & Hike. I took the first one back I bought from them and they said "tough" because I didn't have the receipt. Who keeps $19 receipts? Yea!! for Rivercity. I walked over there and bought the second light and it, too, broke after a week. Again, no receipt (you would think I would have learned, but I thought it was just a freak break). The nice sales manager gal fixed me up with a new, non-Blackburn light that is screwed onto my rack. Not the best light, but it along with the one on the back of my helmet make me feel seen at least.

jyl
10-23-2007, 09:10 PM
I use Nightsun Team in front (dual halogens), some generic blinking tailight in back, also a blinking LED light (a $25 one that clamps to the handlebar) to be better noticed, and a Petzl mountaineering headlamp attached to my helmet (to shine into cars and waggle around, for more noticeability).

Its amazing how many bicyclists you see riding around at night in dark clothes with no lights.

Pdxrunner
10-23-2007, 09:55 PM
I may be the person with the Dinotte rear light if that was The Portland Velo Club Century. I love the rear light! Yes, it is expensive, but so is the deductible on my health insurance. I've had many rear lights and even multiple rearlights, but this is a whole different world. I commute from Beaverton to NE 33rd near Killingsworth. 16 to 17 mi each way. I go via Barbur and there are 2 areas where you ride on the road. With other lights the cars would zip right by me. With the Dinotte, they move into the next lane! It is very visable during the day and I use it on all of my bicycles. I will take the last position in a group on busy roads for saftey of all the riders.

In front I have 2 Dinotte 200 lumen lights. One flashing day time or dusk, one on and one flashing at night with city lighting, both on when in full darkness. They are very small, light nd with the "O" ring mounts they are off the bike in 5 seconds. Expensive yes, but dead or broken bones are much more expensive and painfull! Also great Co. replaced a light I pulledthe cord out of free and sent it before I sent the bad one back! They had an upgrade special to their more powerful light! No one else does that!

toddwaddell
10-24-2007, 08:34 AM
I've got an MiNewt X2 Dual on the front. I really like being able to mount the beams apart from one another. I do think that having the two headlights helps me be seen and noticed.

The blink function on the MiNewt is very good for daytime riding. Motorists definitely see me and move out of my way!

On the back I've got a Blackburn 3 on a seat pack and a NR 5 LED on my helmet. I'm debating adding one more Blackburn to the back of my rack for a little extra light in low visibility (night-rain) conditions. What do you think?

mizake
10-24-2007, 04:36 PM
i got one of the planet bike superflashes for $25 and it is so far working like a charm!

tvhwy
10-24-2007, 05:11 PM
How 'bout these programmable spoke lights (http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=6) for peripheral coverage?

Pdxrunner
10-25-2007, 09:49 PM
These are for AA battery lights not the LI versions, but just add your own AA rechargable battteries & charger and get great lights for an unbelievable price! : From DiNotte:

Customer appreciation weekend. We're having a big sale on our AA headlight and AA taillight. DiNotte Lighting invites all customers and non customers to participate in a very special offer. Starting on Friday at midnight we will have two items available at unprecedented prices. DiNotte AA headlight - Our full featured 200 lumen headlight, standard 12 inch cord length, including the headlight, battery holder, and handlebar mount only (batteries, charger and helmet mount deleted) for a weekend only price of 99.00 USD + shipping and handling. (International orders MUST go EXPRESS mail) Link: http://store.dinottelighting.com/Product55 DiNotte AA Taillight - The Taillight everyone raves about that never goes on sale is on sale this weekend only. System includes taillight engine, battery holder and taillight mount (batteries and charger deleted) $100.00 USD+ shipping and handling. (International orders MUST go EXPRESS mail)Link: http://store.dinottelighting.com/Product56

mizake
10-26-2007, 06:42 AM
so sad. i would love to have both, but my lights are working fine atm. just couldn't justify it.

Let's Bike
10-26-2007, 06:04 PM
Thanks Pdxrunner for the heads-up. I ordered a DiNotte 200L this morning and it was shipped by noon (Wow, I'm impressed ).

Amazon.com is selling the Planet Bike SuperFlash for $16.95 right now. For those who don't want to spend $100 on a DiNotte taillight (such as myself), using two SuperFlash lights is the next best thing you can do IMHO.

My lighting setup:

Helmet:

- Front: River Rock 85 lumen Luxeon K2 LED headlamp ($25 from Target), blinking during day and dusk, and solid high at night in unlit/low light areas.
- Left side: There is a red LED light on the battery pack of the River Rock, so I mounted it on the left side of my helmet and have it in the blink mode to increase side visibility at night.
- Back: Planet Bike SuperFlash ($20.40 from REI).

Handle bar:

- Cat Eye HL-EL530 ($36 from REI, a waste of money!): pointing down to illuminate the roads in front of me. This light is not powerful enough by itself for unlit streets. I'm getting by with the help of the headlamp and the Yukon (see below).
- Planet Bike Beamer 1 (part of a $25 combo): pointing straight (and slightly up) in blinking mode constantly. I'm not sure this is even useful, but I want something blinking in the front when my headlamp is in solid mode.

Fork (just above the brake):

- Princeton Tec Yukon (< $9 (closeout price) from REI): pointing to the roads -- off or in 3-LED mode when riding in lit streets, and Xenon beam when riding in unlit streets.

Back: Cheapo blinkers, one on the rack and the other on the rack trunk.

I'm hoping that the DiNotte 200L will replace the Cat Eye HL-EL530 and the Yukon, and another SuperFlash will replace the blinker on the rack. I'm going to upgrade the LED in the Cat Eye HL-EL530 with a SSC Seoul P4 (U-bin) and use it as a backup.

Why? My commute is 16 miles round-trip between Northwest Hills and Hillsboro including a high-traffic/narrow/no shoulder road (NW Cornell), with unlit/low light areas, steep hills, and inattentive drivers.

lynnef
10-26-2007, 06:27 PM
front: NiteRider MiNewt (original)
rear: Blackburn Mars 2.0 blinkie
helmet:
front - Cateye EL-410 in flasher mode (husband just appropriated it), or Black Diamond LED headlamp, also in flasher mode
rear - a completely annoying, random pattern led flasher (http://www.teamestrogen.com/products.asp?pID=13124)that I got from Team Estrogen (http://www.teamestrogen.com/default.asp)
GloGlovs (http://www.gloglov.com/) on the hands
Reflective stripes on the jacket
I need to put reflective tape on my crankarms and rims...

Dream setup:
front wheel with Schmidt SON28 dynohub (http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/schmidt.asp)and B&M Lumotec IQ Fly Senseo Plus (http://www.bumm.de/index-e.html)light

artizin
11-09-2007, 12:07 PM
I need some rear lighting I'll be picking some up today... but for full frontal lighting, I have a helmet mounted niterider evolution Halogen, and a handlebar mounted Niterider HID Moab. Pretty much when I have both going it's really hard to miss me on a trail or the road.
Once I had a car flash thier lights at me because I was too bright on the street, and I turned one of them off. And when I have both of them on, and I cross beams... it can be soo bright as to wash everything out... no shadows. Kinda odd, And when I use the Hid or the evolution.. my wireless bike computer goes haywire claiming that I'm doing about 57mph when i'm really doing 20mph....

So if you see this bright blinding ball of light on the bike path from Sellwood to downtown at night it might be me. I'll try not to blind you. :D

Donald
11-09-2007, 03:49 PM
Front: L/M Solo MV handlebar mounted; P/B Beamer 5 handlebar mounted.
Rear: P/B Superflash underseat mounted; Blackburn Mars 3.0 bag mounted

etc: Timbuck2 Pro Series shoulder bag, black outer panels with 3M orange reflective middle panel; reflective piping on Novara jacket and tights as well as on my Salsa Bikes winter gloves.

In the pile: An old first-gen NiteRider Digital HeadTrip with a dead battery (which seems to cost as much as the whole set cost me a few years ago). Anyone have a good battery but a dead light? I'm open to negotiations.

WishList: helmet mounted halogen light, programmable spokelights as mentioned earlier in the thread or, from a different company, here:

http://www.hokeyspokes.com/

Own the night!

wyeast
11-09-2007, 07:56 PM
GloGlovs (http://www.gloglov.com/) on the hands

Those are sweet! I gotta get a pair! :D

Oh, and uh... to stay on topic:

Front - Blackburn Quadrant (with the interesting half steady/half blinky pattern) hopefully to be augmented with a Task Force 2C on Lockblocks.

Rear - Two (that's right ;) ) Viewpoint Flashpoints - one on the rack trunk, one clipped to the back of my helmet. (Metro in safety zealot orange)

agramsci
11-12-2007, 12:31 AM
I'm convinced that this is such a deadly serious subject that every cyclist who rides at night in a place like Portland, especially in areas where a lot of wet pavement reflects glare from night lighting and car brakelights all around (eg., downtown) needs to do some serious research on the best lighting. And I'm becoming convinced that, for taillights, red LED blinkies DON'T CUT IT.

There is not a red LED blinker on the market, AT ANY PRICE, that holds a candle -- literally -- against the sea of car brakelights in places like downtown at night.

We are up against a serious problem here, folks. THERE IS NOTHING READILY AVAILABLE ON THE MARKET HERE.

Based on the advice at http://www.bicyclelighting.com I'm going to invest in an amber xenon strobe light to complement or replace my red blinkie. Unfortunately, it requires an electrical project unto itself to rig it up, as it is NOT self contained and requires wiring to a 12V power source -- also not readily available at reasonable size/weight, without special ordering.

The only other, quick-n-dirty alternative I could find, something called "Coghlan's Emergency Strobe Light," is also a special order, not available in any local stores. At least it is a self-contained unit requiring no wiring, though. For now I plan to use it, until I can wire up a more permanent adequate alternative.

I'm eager to share thoughts on this subject with others. I'm currently planning to embark on a special construction project to wire up two amber xenon strobe lights to a 12 V power source, along with a breaker box so that I can use the 12V/10AH NiMH battery pack I'm going to acquire for other devices that need 12V. I don't really know shit about soldering, heat shrink, etc, but I plan to learn fast.

If anyone out there has any of these skills and would be willing to help me, I'd be happy to pay you for your trouble!

K'Tesh
11-12-2007, 08:17 AM
That's Funny! :D I was doing a Search on Amber Strobes myself this weekend! :D

I didn't know about http://www.bicyclelighting.com... But as I am (or was before getting hurt) commuting after dark... on a Freeway... I thought that an amber strobe might be a really good idea!

Keep Us Posted!
K'Tesh

the Wumpus
11-12-2007, 08:51 AM
I like the Superflashes for the back, you can't beat the price for the retina searing light that emanates from them.

I bought a Dinotte 5 watt light last year... It's okay, but that's a lot of money for something that will be outdated in a few months with led's advancing like they are. I think any future headlight upgrades for me will be Fenix (http://www.fenixlight.com/flashlight/fenixl2d.htm) flashlights. $50-60 for a light that makes nearly 50% more light with half as many batteries as my Dinotte seems like an okay deal.

agramsci
11-12-2007, 11:28 AM
Want side visibility? Invest in a pair of Down Low Glow tubes (www.rockthebike.com). There's a youtube video someone posted of a bike outfitted with both the DLG and the "Hokey Spokes." You can barely see the spokes in the overwhelming, eerie glow of the DLG tubes.

How 'bout these programmable spoke lights (http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=6) for peripheral coverage?

mizake
11-12-2007, 12:37 PM
Want side visibility? Invest in a pair of Down Low Glow tubes (www.rockthebike.com). There's a youtube video someone posted of a bike outfitted with both the DLG and the "Hokey Spokes." You can barely see the spokes in the overwhelming, eerie glow of the DLG tubes.

those are quite expensive @ $99 a pop.

nelson_fisher
11-12-2007, 12:47 PM
I posted this in one of the other discussions, but I think it is more appropriate here, since this discussion is about lights.

I've noticed that some rear blinky lights are really hard to see, despite all their blinky-ness. It is usually the pattern blinks (side to side, up and down) that are hard to see. They look really visible from up close, like when you are holding the blinky light, but from more than 20 feet away (like when you are in a car), the individual lights all blend together. With the pattern blinks, the light is never "off" as one or more bulbs are always lit. The standard on/off blinks seem to be more visible from farther away, because there is a contrast between the on and off blinks.

I was driving behind a cyclist the other evening, and his rear blinky light was hardly visible at all. There was a red light that seemed to sort of change intensity, but it never went off and wasn't very attention getting. As I got closer to him (he was in the bike lane, so I was overtaking in the regular lane), I could see that he was using the pattern flashing mode. From up close, you could see the pattern, but from further away, you couldn't see any "flashing". A bit further down the street, there was another cyclist using the on/off blink mode. That light was visible from much further away, and the on/off blinks were more attention getting.

So when you are using your blinky lights, it seems better (at least from my perspective) to use the on/off blink mode instead of the pattern blink mode. Of course, if you have more than one blinky light, you can use both modes, as long as one is set to the on/off mode.

Donald
11-12-2007, 02:28 PM
Seems like I heard about this when I was kid: Flashing lights attract collisions due to folks driving where they are looking.

Anyone have any input on this? My limited googling of it only pulled up anecdotal notes.

Somtimes I semi-jokingly tell myself "So they know where to hit me" when I turn on my tailpipe blinky...

PDXGS
11-12-2007, 02:38 PM
Seems like I heard about this when I was kid: Flashing lights attract collisions due to folks driving where they are looking.

Anyone have any input on this? My limited googling of it only pulled up anecdotal notes.

Somtimes I semi-jokingly tell myself "So they know where to hit me" when I turn on my tailpipe blinky...

It's often referred to as "the moth effect" and there are conflicting studies on it. My anecdotal observations lead me to believe that impaired/drunk drivers tend to be attracted to bright, flashing static lights. Most police cars are now equipped with a directional strobe set that flashes from right to left and seem to give a directionality to the light (moving from right to left) that is rumored to cause drunks to steer to the left rather than guide them into the parked police car or emergency vehicle.
I'm installing two ACR Firefly strobes on my commute bike...illegal, technically yes, because they're both white....but at least no driver can claim that they didn't see me.
There are high wattage LEDs available on the market that car manufacturers are eyeing for car headlight systems but nothing is out there that can currently beat the strobe and HID combination for visibility and conspicuity.

agramsci
11-12-2007, 03:03 PM
To stay legal, you might want to see if you can put an amber film over those strobes. Amber is much less disturbing than white light, but should still be pretty effective.

It's often referred to as "the moth effect" and there are conflicting studies on it. My anecdotal observations lead me to believe that impaired/drunk drivers tend to be attracted to bright, flashing static lights. Most police cars are now equipped with a directional strobe set that flashes from right to left and seem to give a directionality to the light (moving from right to left) that is rumored to cause drunks to steer to the left rather than guide them into the parked police car or emergency vehicle.
I'm installing two ACR Firefly strobes on my commute bike...illegal, technically yes, because they're both white....but at least no driver can claim that they didn't see me.
There are high wattage LEDs available on the market that car manufacturers are eyeing for car headlight systems but nothing is out there that can currently beat the strobe and HID combination for visibility and conspicuity.

PDXGS
11-12-2007, 03:32 PM
To stay legal, you might want to see if you can put an amber film over those strobes. Amber is much less disturbing than white light, but should still be pretty effective.

Yep, I'm going to try a red or amber photo-gel. If I can get the lens off I'll try and coat it with a red erasable overhead marker on the inside or dye it wiht some Rit red dye. All of these options might make it more red'ish-then again, maybe the point is to get noticed...

agramsci
11-12-2007, 06:44 PM
There is also a product called "Coghlan's Emergency Strobe": http://www.campingsurvival.com/coemstli.html

It comes with various colored interchangeable lenses, including amber.

The one problem with these potentially is that they may not oscillate at high enough frequency for traffic conditions. (They're intended more for visibility by search-and-rescue teams.) At only about 1Hz frequency or less, they're not on all that often. With someone swinging fast around a corner, the timing of the flash might not be auspicious enough...

Yep, I'm going to try a red or amber photo-gel. If I can get the lens off I'll try and coat it with a red erasable overhead marker on the inside or dye it wiht some Rit red dye. All of these options might make it more red'ish-then again, maybe the point is to get noticed...

Scott Kocher
11-13-2007, 12:00 PM
For under $40 at Bike Gallery the Blackburn Mars 3 / Quadrant Combo is cheap, waterproof, and has a good wide beam pattern for visibility. I've been running two of them for the last year with good results. Downsides: the brackets are a bit wimpy, and the convex lens gets light in your eyes. Picture of a decent fix for that is here:
http://www.vangelisti.com/prevention/Bicycle-Safety-Information.htm#lights

Let's Bike
11-14-2007, 09:29 PM
Want side visibility? Invest in a pair of Down Low Glow tubes (www.rockthebike.com). There's a youtube video someone posted of a bike outfitted with both the DLG and the "Hokey Spokes." You can barely see the spokes in the overwhelming, eerie glow of the DLG tubes.
those are quite expensive @ $99 a pop.I don't know how they compare to Down Low Glow, but I got a pair of Cold Cathode lights (http://www.vibelights.com/pococabili.html) from Vibelights (http://www.vibelights.com/index.html) for $27.49 ($19.99+shipping), and they are pretty bright.

One caveat is that the inverter takes 12V DC, and the kit comes with an 8-cell AA battery holder, which is fine if you use Alkaline batteries (1.5V each). However, if you are like me, who would rather use rechargeable NiMH batteries (1.2V each), you will need 10 NiMH AA batteries, otherwise the lights become dim pretty quickly. I'm not sure if you will be able to ask Vibelights to ship with a 10-cell holder. I solved the problem by getting a 2-cell AA battery holder from Radio Shack (< $2), and wired both battery holders in series. If anyone is interested in this setup, I'd be happy to provide instructions on how to modify the battery packs (It's pretty easy).

I don't know how well the lights and the switch will hold up in wet weather though, as I have not ridden with them in the rain yet.

K'Tesh
11-16-2007, 08:56 AM
Want side visibility? Invest in a pair of Down Low Glow tubes (www.rockthebike.com). There's a youtube video someone posted of a bike outfitted with both the DLG and the "Hokey Spokes." You can barely see the spokes in the overwhelming, eerie glow of the DLG tubes.


I ordered my set of Down Low Glows from them on Monday (11/12). They were able to charge the battery, then get them to me in time for me to mount them (while riding MAX to the ride's start point (very intuitive mounting system!)) and tie for Most Lit on the See and Be Seen ride! (11/15) :D

They lasted the full ride (in the rain and the wet), and all the way out to the Lucky Lab, and then back to the MAX (Mall stop)... then from Sunset Transit down to the BTC (Beaverton Bomb) then on to home (All that and I'm running slow due to the broken leg).

I'm all about lights, and I'm quite pleased! :D

I didn't reply earlier 'cause I wanted it to be a surprise when I turned up for the See and Be Seen ride.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2405/2037599077_5bba10b979.jpg

Thumbs Up! :D
K'Tesh

artizin
11-16-2007, 08:56 AM
you might have shocking results when the weather turns wet. Like today...

K'Tesh
11-16-2007, 09:04 AM
you might have shocking results when the weather turns wet. Like today...

I'm confused... that's in reply to??? :confused:

wyeast
11-16-2007, 02:42 PM
I think it was to Let'sBike, with the homebrew setup with inverter. Doesn't sound terribly easy to waterproof. :o

RobCat
11-17-2007, 06:51 AM
I've seen it stated elsewhere that it's best to have at least two red lights rearward; one blinking to gain the attention of other traffic and at least one other shining steadily by which to track motion.

I run two reds on my pack and one on the bike, all alight in separate patterns. For headlights I use a NiteHawk 30w dual, 12v SLA (heavy as Hell but effective and affordable), and a CatEye HL-EL410 on my helmet.

K'Tesh
11-17-2007, 07:49 AM
I think it was to Let'sBike, with the homebrew setup with inverter. Doesn't sound terribly easy to waterproof. :o

Oh, I hadn't read that post well enough... now I see what was ment.

Let's Bike did well enough in the rain on the See and Be Seen Ride last thursday... I know, we tied for Best Lit. I'll admit, I didn't get a good look at her wiring (it was dark out there)... and between the two of us, I was getting blinded.

Let's Bike
11-17-2007, 09:08 AM
you might have shocking results when the weather turns wet. Like today...Actually the setup holds up very well in the rain so far. It endured the parade, the ride to the Lucky Lab, parking in the rain, the ride with K'Tesh to the MAX stop, the ride home (3 miles up hills), and the commute yesterday during the wettest hours (11 miles + MAX).

I think it was to Let'sBike, with the homebrew setup with inverter. Doesn't sound terribly easy to waterproof. :oI wouldn't call my setup "home brew", as the only thing I modified was the battery pack. The lights are zip-tied to the bottom of the top tube and down tube, the wires and the inverter (aluminum) are zip-tied/velcroed to the seat tube, and the switch is attached to the seat post under the saddle. The battery packs (in a plastic bag) are in the back pocket (under the saddle) of my rack trunk. The only "waterproofing" I did was to wrap all connectors (3) in electrical tape.

I'm very impressed with K'Tesh's Down Low Glow. They are bright, and they throw lots of light for good ground effect. My setup does not look as cool (my lights are white), but considering the price and the enhanced side-visibility (my only goal), with the side benefits(?) of occasional compliments and winning the "Most Visible" award at the "See and Be Seen" parade (tie with K'Tesh, although I don't feel I deserve it. ;) ), it's a good investment.

mike_khad1
11-17-2007, 05:56 PM
Selected bike stores are honoring a 15% discount on lights and accessories

http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=174567

wyeast
11-18-2007, 08:04 AM
I wouldn't call my setup "home brew",
Sorry, I was mostly referring to your changing up the power pack to two pieces to accommodate the diff. batteries. :o

K'Tesh
11-18-2007, 10:02 AM
I'm very impressed with K'Tesh's Down Low Glow. They are bright, and they throw lots of light for good ground effect. My setup does not look as cool (my lights are white), but considering the price and the enhanced side-visibility (my only goal), with the side benefits(?) of occasional compliments and winning the "Most Visible" award at the "See and Be Seen" parade (tie with K'Tesh, although I don't feel I deserve it. ;) ), it's a good investment.

You might think about painting your lights...

Tammie's Hobbies (in Beaverton) sells Tamiya Acrylic Clear paints... I've got Red, and Blue, I know that there's an amber and green... perhaps more.

If you didn't like the effect, you could just wash it off w/water while it's still wet, or wrap the light w/plastic before you paint it.

Btw: I followed the link to Vibelites (http://www.vibelights.com/elwibikit.html)... Hmmm... What could I do with this... Hmmm... ;)

Let's Bike
11-18-2007, 02:01 PM
I broke the cold cathode bulb under my top tube by accident last night while trying to untangle my bike with a bike rack -- I was lifting the bike from the top tube, forgetting the bulb was there (duh!). The glass light tube came housed in an Acrylic tube, which is not hard enough to prevent bending, and of course, the glass tube itself is quite delicate.

Despite of the mishap, the light under down tube exuded very bright white light, giving me plenty of respect on the road. A woman commented that I was the most well-lit cyclist she had ever seen (apparently she has not seen K'Tesh yet ;)), and a man jokingly said that he could not see me.

I still recommend these lights (they passed the wet weather test yesterday), but instead of attaching to the top tube, one of the chainstays might be a better place (You also get ground effect with this setup). If you are willing to spend a fistful of cash, Down Low Glow is a better choice (A double-light setup like mine will set you back at least $129) -- it's pretty bombproof (There is an impressive video on their website, where a guy drops a brick on a Down Low Glow, and the brick just bounces off), and it comes with a one year warranty (No warranty was mentioned at the vibelights website). If you still decide to get these lights from vibelights, I suggest that you also get a couple more CCFL bulbs ($5 each) as spares, so you don't have to pay another $7.50 for shipping like me if a bulb breaks (I'm sure you can get bulbs locally, but I'm too lazy to find out where, and make the trip). Even better, you can get bulbs in different colors, so you can play with them and see which works the best for you.

You might think about painting your lights...
Since I have to replace a bulb and it does not make sense to get just one or two and pay $7.5 for shipping, and since changing bulbs is very easy (they connect to the inverter via connectors), and since the bulbs are pretty inexpensive, I ordered one in each color (except blacklight) this time. I would really look like a Christmas tree comes the Christmas time. :D

K'Tesh
11-18-2007, 03:39 PM
I broke the cold cathode bulb under my top tube by accident last night while trying to untangle my bike with a bike rack -- I was lifting the bike from the top tube, forgetting the bulb was there (duh!)...

Since I have to replace a bulb and it does not make sense to get just one or two and pay $7.5 for shipping, and since changing bulbs is very easy (they connect to the inverter via connectors), and since the bulbs are pretty inexpensive, I ordered one in each color (except blacklight) this time. I would really look like a Christmas tree comes the Christmas time. :D

Sorry to hear about you loosing a bulb...:(

I had to search for the DLG shockproof video... but I found it here (http://rockthebike.com/node/342). They dropped the brick on an aluminum softdrink can, then the DLG from about 18 inches (without cutting from one to the other).

I was thinking... if you order white again... you could get some of those colored plastic films (like you see covering gift baskets), and you could change colors on a whim... hmmm :rolleyes:

See you out there!
K'Tesh

Pdxrunner
11-22-2007, 06:22 PM
Has anybody seen these on the street?

http://www.sweetskinz.com/html/home.htm
Cyclepath is listed as a dealer!

agramsci
11-23-2007, 05:49 PM
Glad I could turn someone else on to this great product. It seems like every night I ride with these, multiple people stop and ask me about them, where I got 'em, etc.

I still debate on the best color tho. I settled on green with the reasoning that it's in the part of the spectrum that the human eye is most sensitive to. OTOH, it arguably sends the wrong message, since green means "Go", exactly the opposite of what I want to convey!

K'Tesh
11-23-2007, 05:54 PM
Thanks for the suggestion on the Down Low Glows (DLGs) I've been having a lot of fun with them (Intimidates the hell out of stealth bicyclists... gives me an open to talk about bike lights, tickets, and injuries/insurance).

I liked the green too, but I settled on blue as my bike glows blue already... If I were to re-do the trailer's reflective tape (which might happen) I was thinking red to accent the blue and get a purple shade...

Rubber Side down!
K'Tesh

Let's Bike
11-23-2007, 07:43 PM
I was thinking... if you order white again... you could get some of those colored plastic films (like you see covering gift baskets), and you could change colors on a whim... hmmm :rolleyes:That's a great idea! I'd love to be able to change the white lights to amber (trying to follow the statute). Do you know where I can get those films?

I still debate on the best color tho. I settled on green with the reasoning that it's in the part of the spectrum that the human eye is most sensitive to. OTOH, it arguably sends the wrong message, since green means "Go", exactly the opposite of what I want to convey!
I have white, red, blue, green, and purple CCFL tubes to play with. Here is what I found:

Brightness: white > (whitish) purple > green > red > blue
Eye-catchiness: green > blue > red > white > purple

I thought about using green for my chainstay, but opted for red lest green would send the wrong message, and blue or purple may not be legal.

K'Tesh
11-23-2007, 08:06 PM
(Edit... Plastic films) That's a great idea! I'd love to be able to change the white lights to amber (trying to follow the statute). Do you know where I can get those films?

Thanks,
I'd try Michaels Craft Store, or any flowershop, perhaps even in Freddies or WinCo. I'd let my fingers do the walking first... My leg sure isn't up to a hike.

(I'm So Bright, My Parents call me Sun) http://www.bikeportland.org/forum/images/icons/icon6.gif

Cya Out There!
K'Tesh

artizin
11-28-2007, 11:08 AM
Has anybody seen these on the street?

http://www.sweetskinz.com/html/home.htm
Cyclepath is listed as a dealer!

These are pretty cool... I haven't seen anyone using them yet... but at 39.00 dollars a tire.... I'm not sure I'm going to make the jump... but for coolness factor.... They rock it.

mizake
12-14-2007, 06:33 AM
i couldn't find the original thread concerning the blinding lights some folks use on the trail.

anyway, the bulb burned out on my light and i've been waiting a week for the replacement. in the meantime i've been using a planet bike, blue LED light. it's nowhere near as bright as my light and motion solo (which is, in turn, nowhere near as bright as some of the other lights i've seen on the trail) but it kind of works. it works right up until i'm coming up on someone headed in the opposite direction who has their light pointed straight ahead.

this is amazingly annoying and dangerous. if you don't have one of these high-powered lights, then you can't recover your night vision as easily without your own high-powered light. i've literally had to hold up my hand to block the light coming from some of these lights. i can't be the only one. and whoever is on the opposite side of that light HAS to see the reaction.

please angle your lights toward the trail and not directly ahead!

think of it as high beams and low beams for cars. it is illegal to drive with your high beams on all the time BECAUSE IT'S DANGEROUS. same thing here. except less catastrophic, of course.

lazlo
12-14-2007, 12:32 PM
Bike Nashbar has Blinky Super Flashes for $19.95 right now.

djasonpenney
04-25-2008, 06:56 PM
I attach a red blinkie to my left leg band. That way when I'm pedaling murderists see a characteristic up-and-down motion as well as the blinking, giving them a clue what they're looking at. This is in addition to the Planet Bike and Blackburn blinkies on my tail bag.

Oh, and I run a CatEye front blinkie, a Marwi Kamikaze (12 watt halogen) and a MiNewt on the handlebars, and another MiNewt on my helmet so I can turn my head and get the attention of murderists approaching from the side. Also useful on the multi-use trails to see just what that thing is off to the side that might choose to dart in front of me.

Now if only I could improve side visibility. I had a gal cross a solid white line (westbound at Barnes Road, nearing the light at Cedar Hills Boulevard) who came close to making Lambchop Pizza because I happened to be on the piece of pavement she wanted...

"Bike lights are like tattoos, you always want another one."

vincentpaul
04-30-2008, 02:14 PM
When my commute is dark morning and evening I have a pair of Malibu yard lights with halogen bulbs mounted up front under my bars, and a Blackburn something or other LED running flashing up front on top of the bars. I usually have a 20 watt halogen and either a 35 or 50 watt halogen bulb in the landscape fixtures. The bulbs are spots from Phillips and I think the 20 has something like 1000 lumens and the 50 something like 2500 lumens. Basically, you could land an F-18 on an aircraft carrier with those things. I have to be careful that they are angled properly or they can blind on-coming traffic. Literally. The large, sealed-lead-acid battery also powers two amber side-mounted running lights and a red trailer-brake light, all three mounted to the rear rack. Based on my work with law enforcement in DUII enforcement hearings, I'm of the belief that solid lights are better on the back of a vehicle, so I don't run any rear-facing flashers. On the other hand, I angle my flashing front white LEDs at about 45 degrees left in order to catch the attention of motorists who are out to get me with a right hook maneuver; the blackburn is woefully inadequate as a primary light, but just about perfect for this function. The downfall to my setup is that it weights about 15 pounds; on the other hand, the purpose is to get me to and from work alive.

bonny790
05-01-2008, 08:46 AM
When my commute is dark morning and evening I have a pair of Malibu yard lights with halogen bulbs mounted up front under my bars, and a Blackburn something or other LED running flashing up front on top of the bars. I usually have a 20 watt halogen and either a 35 or 50 watt halogen bulb in the landscape fixtures. The bulbs are spots from Phillips and I think the 20 has something like 1000 lumens and the 50 something like 2500 lumens. Basically, you could land an F-18 on an aircraft carrier with those things. I have to be careful that they are angled properly or they can blind on-coming traffic. Literally. The large, sealed-lead-acid battery also powers two amber side-mounted running lights and a red trailer-brake light, all three mounted to the rear rack. Based on my work with law enforcement in DUII enforcement hearings, I'm of the belief that solid lights are better on the back of a vehicle, so I don't run any rear-facing flashers. On the other hand, I angle my flashing front white LEDs at about 45 degrees left in order to catch the attention of motorists who are out to get me with a right hook maneuver; the blackburn is woefully inadequate as a primary light, but just about perfect for this function. The downfall to my setup is that it weights about 15 pounds; on the other hand, the purpose is to get me to and from work alive.

I'd like to hear/see more about your setup. I found a how to online somewhere a while back, that used Malibu lights. I bought most of the fixins for it, but I'm not too impressed with how the light attaches to the mount. The light has a plastic housing and can't be that durable the way the author attached it, and I haven't had the time to do much with it, but would like to know more about your setup.

Thanks

Toby

vincentpaul
05-01-2008, 11:44 AM
I'd like to hear/see more about your setup.

The Malibu fixture I use is a cast metal model (http://www.malibulights.com/index.php?action=subcategory&did=1&cid=2&sid=5&pid=CL507). You have to add something inside the fixture to keep the bulb from rattling loose. I just take a couple of paperclips and make a little spring that presses against the glass and bulb, which keeps it in place fine. I purchased a little aluminium/plastic project box and three bi-pole DC toggle switches at Radio Shack. Standard 18 gauge lamp cord for the wiring. Connected it all together with the crimp-on connectors. Very simple, very rugged, very heavy. Works great if you want to light up the night and lose weight as well.

djasonpenney
05-01-2008, 01:54 PM
So, you have two of these Malibu lights? Tell us about the power supply and charging system.

Thanks!

vincentpaul
05-01-2008, 04:02 PM
I picked up a sealed lead acid battery and charger for @ $50-60 at a local battery shop (its on TV Highway near the Bike Gallery, cant remember the name). Pick your weight. The more the battery weighs, the longer it will run. I charge it each night. When running only the 20w front and the rear lights I get about 3 hours per charge; i put quick connects on the battery so that I can just plug it in each night when I get home. There's a picture of it at:

http://home.comcast.net/~vincentpaul/bike_08_01_10.jpg (http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=378051&highlight=)
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=378051&highlight= (http://http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=378051&highlight=)

bonny790
05-01-2008, 04:22 PM
Great, thank you! That's better than the setup I had in mind. Looks sharp.

Toby

vincentpaul
05-02-2008, 09:02 AM
If you decide to build one up, keep the fixtures away from your plastic cable housings. Halogens operate at high temperatures. The housing gets warm enough to melt plastic (keep skin away too).

djasonpenney
05-02-2008, 10:58 AM
Sorry to keep asking questions, but this is really interesting. You have a rear light as well? Is that what the third switch is for? What did you use for that rear light?

The two front lights--do you run them independently (in parallel) so you can run either one?

Thanks for the picture!

vincentpaul
05-02-2008, 12:20 PM
Sorry to keep asking questions, but this is really interesting. You have a rear light as well? Is that what the third switch is for? What did you use for that rear light?

The two front lights--do you run them independently (in parallel) so you can run either one?

Thanks for the picture!

The front lights are independent, but share a common ground, so only three wires. The rear lights are all on one switch. I use boat-trailer side running lights and brake lights. They are bright enough to use as running lights during the day, and are completely immersible because of their intended use. sealed well against water intrusion.

K'Tesh
05-24-2008, 09:14 AM
Just picked up a new PRIME 500 Watt Halogen light for my bike... :)

http://images.orgill.com/200x200/4764767.jpg (http://electrical.hardwarestore.com/12-portable-lighting.aspx)

Of course, it's not for riding with... I got it for repairing/cleaning my bike (My porch is really dark at night)... Boy, My bike is spoiled ;)

Now, if I could just attach it w/o being connected to the grid.... hmmm :rolleyes:

Rubberside Down!
K'Tesh

vincentpaul
05-27-2008, 08:33 AM
Just picked up a new PRIME 500 Watt Halogen light for my bike... :)

http://images.orgill.com/200x200/4764767.jpg (http://electrical.hardwarestore.com/12-portable-lighting.aspx)

Of course, it's not for riding with... I got it for repairing/cleaning my bike (My porch is really dark at night)... Boy, My bike is spoiled ;)

Now, if I could just attach it w/o being connected to the grid.... hmmm :rolleyes:

Rubberside Down!
K'Tesh

Go to Joe's or Shucks' Auto and look for one of the handheld 12V halogen spots. My memory is that they throw about 50,000 lumens or so. I actually placed one in my shopping cart at one point before reason took over. That was the same trip I purchased the 48 LED truck brake-light strip, but later returned it. I still regret returning that. There's something oddly cool about a 2-foot wide safety light.....God, I'm such a dweeb.

djasonpenney
05-27-2008, 09:14 AM
Funny you should mention that. The only thing that stopped me at Joe's one day last winter was I couldn't read the current requirements of the light. I was seriously thinking about a motorcycle battery, my handlebar bag, and a trickle charger. I hadn't gotten as far as designing the handlebar mount before I, too, succumbed to reason.

Go to Joe's or Shucks' Auto and look for one of the handheld 12V halogen spots. My memory is that they throw about 50,000 lumens or so. I actually placed one in my shopping cart at one point before reason took over. That was the same trip I purchased the 48 LED truck brake-light strip, but later returned it. I still regret returning that. There's something oddly cool about a 2-foot wide safety light.....God, I'm such a dweeb.

Chain of Fool
02-24-2011, 10:28 PM
I understand how a helmet mounted head light would be useful, especially in conjunction with a strobe on the handlebar. Lately I've seen red blinky tail lights on helmets too. If my head wags or I sometimes look to the side I expect that my visibility will be compromised. Though it would be a relief not to have to take the tail light off my bike every time I park it. Is that the value that makes it popular ? Is there something I'm missing ?
thanks in advance for any comments.

wsbob
02-25-2011, 12:34 AM
Chain of Fool...old thread, which is o.k., because lighting for bikes and new, different ways people are using lights for bikes is an evolving and improving thing.

What I've noticed, is that a tail light mounted on top of the helmet stands out a little better against the visual clutter than do bike lights mounted on seat posts. Just tonight, walking to the coffee shop, I saw a cyclist I've seen before. This cyclist has the helmet tail light, but also, a seat post tail light and, if you know what I'm talking about...the bar end tail lights too. None of his lights are the super bright types like the Dinotte lights. I'll just guess they're around 50 lumens compared to the basic Dinotte tail light, which is 120 lumens:

Dinotte 140r tailight at biketiresdirect (http://www.biketiresdirect.com/product/dinotte-lighting-140r-aa-r-tail-light)

http://www.biketiresdirect.com/productimages/images450/dl1401-1.jpg

I don't think I've seen that picture of the Dinotte tail light. At least, I never noticed that round switch button on top.

Just found a pic of bar end tail lights sold by Trek, on a site for Trek of Pittsburg Trek bar end lights at Trek of Pittsburgh (http://trekofpgh.com/product/trek-beacon-bar-end-lights-39297-1.htm):

http://trekofpgh.com/images/library/large/trek_402907_08_m.jpg




What seems to me has got to be a challenge and a chore, is keeping all those battery powered lights charged up. My own tail light setup is currently not great...just one of those low powered Blackburn 3.0 lights. I'm thinking of getting something more powerful...like the Light and Motion Vis 180 (see the other thread in this category.), though it's kind of odd and a bit expensive for the level of illumination it offers...35 lumens.

I haven't warmed up yet to the idea of helmet lights, sufficient to actually use one on the helmet. If helmet manufacturers were smart, they'd design and offer some helmet models with high powered lights incorporated into the helmet shells in a swoopy stylish way. I might actually want to wear one of those. Bell used to make a plain looking helmet model...the Citi..., that had a place on the back of the helmet to clip a tail light onto, but I don't think they make such a helmet any longer.

Helmet mounted lights seem like a fairly good idea to me, but probably in addition to seat post and tail lights mounted elsewhere on the bike...not instead of.

Bent Bloke
02-25-2011, 11:23 AM
I use a helmet mounted blinky taillight because my generator-powered taillight doesn't blink. And I think the light being higher up stands out better than lights mounted at the same height as car taillights.

I actually got started using the helmet mounted taillight just for redundancy when I had battery-powered taillights. On the occasion when my regular taillight ran down during my commute, I was still covered by my helmet mounted light.

dmc
02-26-2011, 12:44 AM
I use a handlebar mounted headlight and a red blinkie mounted on my seat stay. I spend most of my time riding during the daylight hours. Having the red rear blinkie is enough for me during daylight hours.

lacorota
02-27-2011, 10:51 AM
Front: (1) Light and Motion 1400R handlebar mount.

Rear: (2) Planet Bike blinkies
(1) Trek 6-LED flasher
(1) Bush-Mueller 4D Toplight

The combo has been effective so far (hide intact). However, after seeing sufficient numbers of drivers run traffic lights, stop signs, and make lots of "California style" stops at intersections, I always presume oncoming motorists don't see me, or I should assert they don't WANT to see me.

Two weeks ago we had an almost-crash near S.E. 7th and Hawthorne. Lunch hour -- traffic was backing up a bit next to us. Several of us were in our marked bike lane travelling southbound; motorist at intersection made FULL eye contact with us and then raced across our bike lane to secure her place in line. The cyclist in front of me had to skid onto his side. That motorist selfishly decided making her lunch appointment was worth perhaps killing someone on a bike. She raced on with blatant disregard.

There are times, too, such as Saturday nights near hot hipster bars and taverns I turn my radar up a notch. Drunks have been known to rear-end stopped cop cars with flashing lights, so they could likely hit a well-lit cyclist too. Drunks use their auto-pilot to navigate, and it may or may not include observing for cyclists. They've got a buzz going, got turned down at the bar, angry, and now weaving a path home.

Good old-fashioned reflector vests and reflective tape is superb for the peripheral views and not to be ignored. As a motorist, I really take notice at bikes with lots of side-mounted reflection.

I digressed to emphasize that nothing is a substitute for sharpened awareness. All my lights don't form an impermeable force field. When I think I'm in some protective bubble, that's when I get wake-up calls. There's a point of diminishing returns if you're dealing with selfish or drunk idiots. K'tesh makes a good point with the mega-watt lamp, that is, even that would not prevent some of the jerks out there from sacrificing someone to meet their precious schedule or make it home from the tavern with a head full of PBR.

edki
02-27-2011, 12:18 PM
I run multiple types of lights.
On front: handle bar mounted niterider dual (700?) and a helmet mounted planet bike light (1/2 watt).
I use the niterider in a steady on mode (except in daylight) as the strobe effect is a bit overpowering for my tastes at night.
I also have a 30w tactical flash light taped to the bars in case of battery failure or exceptional fog, but generaly don't use it.
The helmet mounted light I run in flash mode as a signifier that "I'm a bike". Combined with the the bright lights, generally cars don't cut in front of me, but I'm still hyper vigilant and considering upgrading the helmet light to something more powerful.

I'm not so worried about being run down from behind. I have two planet bike super flash lights, one helmet mounted, one mounted on my kit-bag.
Again, I have one flashing ("here I am!") and one steady-on. I recall reading somewhere that drunk drivers have an especially hard time guaging distance with flashing lights, so I hope the steady one will give them a range point that they can avoid, by a (hopefully) wide margin.

In addition to the lights I have reflective materials on the bike, my helmet, and my bag. Side lighting is still a gap that I've yet to find a good solution for.

Regardless, I think healthy paranoia is better protection than all lights and reflective materials combined. I've had a fair number of instances where people look at me but don't SEE me because they're looking for a car...

wsbob
02-27-2011, 04:08 PM
Front: (1) Light and Motion 1400R handlebar mount.

Rear: (2) Planet Bike blinkies
(1) Trek 6-LED flasher
(1) Bush-Mueller 4D Toplight

The combo has been effective so far (hide intact). However, after seeing sufficient numbers of drivers run traffic lights, stop signs, and make lots of "California style" stops at intersections, I always presume oncoming motorists don't see me, or I should assert they don't WANT to see me.

Two weeks ago we had an almost-crash near S.E. 7th and Hawthorne. Lunch hour -- traffic was backing up a bit next to us. Several of us were in our marked bike lane travelling southbound; motorist at intersection made FULL eye contact with us and then raced across our bike lane to secure her place in line. The cyclist in front of me had to skid onto his side. That motorist selfishly decided making her lunch appointment was worth perhaps killing someone on a bike. She raced on with blatant disregard.

There are times, too, such as Saturday nights near hot hipster bars and taverns I turn my radar up a notch. Drunks have been known to rear-end stopped cop cars with flashing lights, so they could likely hit a well-lit cyclist too. Drunks use their auto-pilot to navigate, and it may or may not include observing for cyclists. They've got a buzz going, got turned down at the bar, angry, and now weaving a path home.

Good old-fashioned reflector vests and reflective tape is superb for the peripheral views and not to be ignored. As a motorist, I really take notice at bikes with lots of side-mounted reflection.

I digressed to emphasize that nothing is a substitute for sharpened awareness. All my lights don't form an impermeable force field. When I think I'm in some protective bubble, that's when I get wake-up calls. There's a point of diminishing returns if you're dealing with selfish or drunk idiots. K'tesh makes a good point with the mega-watt lamp, that is, even that would not prevent some of the jerks out there from sacrificing someone to meet their precious schedule or make it home from the tavern with a head full of PBR.


"... (1) Bush-Mueller 4D Toplight ..." lacorota

Would this be the critter? I wish they'd make some effort to indicate relative brightness of these lights to others. (from Peter White Cycles website Bush-Mueller 4D Toplight at Peter White Cycles website (http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/taillights.asp).


http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/images/products/Lights/328bl.jpg

The Busch&Müller 4DToplight Permanent has four LEDs, two in the center and one each on each side of the reflector for increased visibility to the side. It looks the same as the DToplight Plus but has a switch on the bottom. It is powered by 2 AA batteries. $ 27.50


Peter Whites tail light page has a mind boggling summary of tail lights that Bushch&Müller offers. Most are for use with a hub dynamo. Bushch&Müller's bike light technology seems to be way more sophisticated than that of American bike light manufacturers. From Peter White's site, check out the following partial description for a different Bushch&Müller light that for bike lighting, is very unique and potentially very helpful towards keeping road users safely distanced from each other:

Busch&Müller DIWA Plus system

The new Distance Warning, or DIWA system for hub dynamos from Busch&Müller senses when the bike slows down. When riding at night with your lights on, the taillight will glow brighter when you slow down, just like the brake lights on an automobile. In the daytime with the lights off, the taillight will come on just as a car's brake lights would.

lacorota
02-27-2011, 10:48 PM
WSBob-- yup, that's the light. It's not (relatively) a super-bright lamp. Some refer to it as more reflection than actual powered light. That's why I include 3 other lights with the Bush-Mueller in my rear-light arsenal.

I've noticed it does have lots of reflection and when I've ridden behind others with the same light noticed it really dazzles when hit with a direct light. I burn it almost all rides, day or night. It seems to have great battery life considering the weekly hours I keep it going. And, it seems mostly waterproof and quite durable. It snaps back in place with each battery exchange, and it survives some rough descents on Mt. Tabor's cobbled asphalt (shake, rattle, roll) It's a direct fit with Tubus and other racks using the 50 / 80mm hole patterns. I've had it but 3 months, so time will tell if she lasts.

lynnef
02-28-2011, 12:41 PM
my lighting hasn't changed much over the past few years. Generator hub, IQ Fly headlight on the commuter bike, Supernova E3 on the rando bike. Planet Bike Superflash on the helmet. Commute bike has a Radbot500 on the rear rack (in the zzzzzPOP flash pattern). Rando bike has a PB Superflash, plus the Radbot500. I run one steady, one flashing. Petzl e+lite on the helmet in front - on commutes it is in flashing mode, on rando rides it is on low, so I can read my cue sheet in the dark.

The Radbot seems to consume batteries at a faster rate than the PB Superflashes, so I never use it as the only rear light.

Lots of reflectives - shoes, booties, Showers Pass jacket, commuter helmet, Ortlieb panniers, GloGlovs (which a driver commented VERY FAVORABLY on just last week).

A friend had his generator light wires break on a ride last week. He had to ride really fast to finish before dark. Mine broke (several years old) when I removed the wheel for maintenance; they were promptly resoldered. But it does have me thinking about carrying a backup front light. Darn. Extra weight. Not that I have, to date, had lighting issues on a rando ride. (Unless you are very, very fast, expect to be riding in the dark for several hours on anything longer than a 200k. And on a 200k, in the winter :))

I don't spend much, if any time charging batteries. The rear blinkies don't need battery replacement often. Wonderfully liberating.

wsbob
02-28-2011, 02:10 PM
I know it's extra work, but when they note which lights they're using, I kind of wish people were posting images of some of the lesser well known lights they're using and links to a site they can read more about them.

I'd forgotten what the IQ Fly headlight looked like (a Bush and Muller generator light product) :

http://harriscyclery.net/merchant/370/images/large/lt132a.jpg

The Supernova E3 Pro, shown below with the multimount option; hub dynamo light, about which Peter White Cycles say: "... Since then (2007) the E3 has been transformed into one of the brightest dynamo headlights you can buy at any price. ..." Supernova E3 lights at Peter White Cycles (http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/supernova.asp).

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/images/products/Lights/SUP-E3_multimount_480x360.jpg

lynnef
03-04-2011, 12:21 PM
and deprive you of the chance to do so? Yes it is extra work. Also extra time :) And I was eating lunch AT work.

wsbob
03-04-2011, 05:49 PM
I'm not going to do anything to get between a girl and and important meal http://bikeportland.org/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif ! Can't do good work without proper nutrition.

Posting pics is no big deal. Doesn't take me that long.

If I think it's important enough to add a picture, I'll don't much mind doing it, though from the perspective of narrative flow, the idea of having the pics in the post where they were described, seemed better to me than myself or someone else sticking them in a separate post.

The Supernova E3 is quite the nice looking light. The mount too. Much better styling than Dinottes (not overlooking the fact that Dinottes are functionally, very effective at what they do.)