PDA

View Full Version : Direct Action


Coyote
06-22-2007, 06:24 PM
Martin Luther King refered to civil disobedience as "direct action". Twice this week I have seen other posters suggest direct action. These suggestions were in the comments for the Burdic article and the article on PPB sting this week.

Tonight I ran across others that have gone down that path (or, ahem, lane).....http://www.ibiketo.ca/node/354

Is this time coming to the Northwest? Love it or hate it the time for Critical Mass has passed, where will the energy go?

Simple Nature
06-23-2007, 06:38 AM
I think it is a great idea expect that in certain municipalities you will be flog'd, beaten, drawn & quartered, and then arrested for defacing public property and resisting arrest... and eventually be found guilty of taggin' ...you radical scum! :p

jwdoom
07-02-2007, 08:17 PM
Martin Luther King refered to civil disobedience as "direct action". Twice this week I have seen other posters suggest direct action. These suggestions were in the comments for the Burdic article and the article on PPB sting this week.

Wow, comparing riding a bike to civil rights. Someone's got an inflated ego.

Attornatus_Oregonensis
07-02-2007, 08:32 PM
Wow, comparing riding a bike to civil rights. Someone's got an inflated ego.

I couldn't disagree more. I think cycling as a form of transportation is a moral issue. Yes, I said a moral issue. Cars contribute in a major way to climate change, perpetuate our dependence on foreign oil and the requisite wars, push our society ever closer to peak oil, spew hazardous air pollutants that we have no choice but to breathe every day, worsen the obesity epidemic, and kill thousands of people each year.

As an American, you have a moral duty to get out of your car now, if you are physically capable of doing so. Breaking our addiction to oil will be as big an issue for America as the civil rights struggle is and, like the civil rights movement, will spell the end of our democracy if it is not accomplished.

The time for passively sitting by and watching automobiles slowly destroy the earth and lower the quality of life for everyone is over. DIRECT ACTION NOW!!

Simple Nature
07-02-2007, 09:23 PM
...if all cars and trucks... and maybe even motorcycles and bikes... were to face East... gun it all at the very same time... the world would return to a perfect 360 day year and all climate systems would return the balance we've all become comfortable with.

...or not :p

Duncan
07-03-2007, 08:18 AM
...if all cars and trucks... and maybe even motorcycles and bikes... were to face East... gun it all at the very same time... the world would return to a perfect 360 day year and all climate systems would return the balance we've all become comfortable with.

...or not :p
wow whatever you put in your coffee... pass it over here!

norse rider
07-03-2007, 10:04 AM
I couldn't disagree more. I think cycling as a form of transportation is a moral issue. Yes, I said a moral issue. Cars contribute in a major way to climate change, perpetuate our dependence on foreign oil and the requisite wars, push our society ever closer to peak oil, spew hazardous air pollutants that we have no choice but to breathe every day, worsen the obesity epidemic, and kill thousands of people each year.

As an American, you have a moral duty to get out of your car now, if you are physically capable of doing so. Breaking our addiction to oil will be as big an issue for America as the civil rights struggle is and, like the civil rights movement, will spell the end of our democracy if it is not accomplished.

The time for passively sitting by and watching automobiles slowly destroy the earth and lower the quality of life for everyone is over. DIRECT ACTION NOW!!

Yup, right on.

Coyote
07-03-2007, 01:02 PM
jwdoom, after re-reading my post I don't think that I compared cycling to the civil rights movememt. I simply gave provanance to the term direct action. (I like the term, it is a lot easier to type than "civil disobedience".)

However, cycling is part of a social movement. Once you start looking a roads as public space, you start to see all sorts of possibilities for that space. Cars dominate (pervert?) the use of that resource. The costs of developing roads has been externalized for so long, that perhaps, we need a shock to see it clearly. The social costs that A.O. points out can be added to the monetary costs. (On second thought they should not be added, they should be exponents.)

The Toronto group took the matter into their own hands in a way other than CM. I hoped the article would spark discussion, and perhaps some creativity.

Rixtir
07-03-2007, 01:08 PM
jwdoom, after re-reading my post I don't think that I compared cycling to the civil rights movememt. I simply gave provanance to the term direct action. (I like the term, it is a lot easier to type than "civil disobedience".)

However, cycling is part of a social movement. Once you start looking a roads as public space, you start to see all sorts of possibilities for that space. Cars dominate (pervert?) the use of that resource. The costs of developing roads has been externalized for so long, that perhaps, we need a shock to see it clearly. The social costs that A.O. points out can be added to the monetary costs. (On second thought they should not be added, they should be exponents.)

The Toronto group took the matter into their own hands in a way other than CM. I hoped the article would spark discussion, and perhaps some creativity.Do you think Portland isn't taking action to make this a more bike-friendly city?

Coyote
07-03-2007, 02:05 PM
Rixter, I think the advocacy community in Portland is incredibly active. I cycle commute in Portland about four days a month, the rest of the time I ride in Eugene. Compared to hippie wasteland that Eugene advocacy has become, Portland is electric.

Rixtir
07-03-2007, 02:09 PM
hippie wasteland that Eugene advocacy has becomeNot sure what you mean. Do you mean they're not active?