The people, clubs, and culture that make up Portland’s bike scene.

‘When you have it, it’s priceless’: Nine questions for Seleta Reynolds

Posted on September 24th, 2015 at 9:16 am.

Seleta Reynolds
Los Angeles transportation director Seleta Reynolds.
(Photo via TREC at PSU)

Seleta Reynolds gets results.

As we reported last week, the city whose livable streets program she led for three years, San Francisco, has subsequently delivered the nation’s most consistent string of boosts in bike commuting.

She’s now one year into a vastly larger gig: transportation director for the City of Los Angeles, which turned millions of heads last month when it rolled out a citywide plan to gradually reallocate numerous auto lanes to create dedicated bus lanes and 300 miles of protected bike lanes.

She’s also one of the most reflective transportation leaders in the country, as the interview below makes clear. Ahead of her free Oct. 6 talk at Ecotrust, we caught up with Reynolds to discuss her advice for Portland’s advocates and bureaucrats, the arguments for biking that work best and whether Portland is still cool.


Portland artists featured in Artcrank’s new online store

Posted on September 3rd, 2015 at 3:32 pm.

Detail of Rory Phillips’ poster.

We’re big fans of Artcrank, billed by its founder Charles Youel as “A poster party for bike people.” The event first came to Portland in 2009 and has returned each year since to inspire and entertain us with its creative representations of the thing we all know and love

While it won’t be back this year, Youel got in touch with us yesterday to share the news that Portland is still in his plans. He’s scaling back live events and has turned his focus toward a new website which launched this week. Similar to his live shows Artcrank.com features 30 artists who’ve created bike-inspired posters.

Of the 30 artists featured in his first online exhibition, three of them are from Portland.


Learn more about Portland’s new bi-weekly ‘Rush Hour Alleycat’

Posted on July 23rd, 2015 at 9:24 am.


The bike scene in Portland is a wonderfully dynamic thing. It never stops evolving and there are always new people, ideas, and events coming into it. As they do, they keep the scene healthy by forcing it to re-invent itself and absorb new perspectives.

Part of my job is to monitor this ecosystem and understand the role that each piece has on the greater whole. One such piece that I’ve recently heard about is the Rush Hour Alleycat.

Like many new things that appear on the Portland bike scene horizon, it starts with some tweets or maybe at text and email or two from the organizer. Then it might gain a Facebook page or website. The event might fizzle out. Or, if enough people link into it, it might sustain itself and build into something special.

(Side note: Have you noticed how big the weekly Thursday Night Ride has gotten? Organizer Nathan Jones (proprietor of Ride Yr Bike bike shop) started it as a way to keep the Pedalpalooza spirit strong. Now it attracts well over 100 people every week. It meets at 7:30 tonight at Salmon Street Fountain if you’re curious.)

Now, back to this Rush Hour Alleycat…


‘Reconnecting the Gorge’ films debut amid enthusiasm for Historic Hwy completion

Posted on July 15th, 2015 at 11:57 am.

Reconnecting The Gorge Series 1/6 – From Historic Road to Trail, by Path Less Pedaled


Guest article: Biking on the cheap

Posted on July 7th, 2015 at 11:50 am.

Disaster Relief Trials -43
Reuben Deumling.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

This article was written by Reuben Deumling, a Portland resident, active participant in the local cargo biking scene, and frequent commenter who some of you may know as “9watts.” You might also recall the cool, DIY wooden child seat he shared with us back in 2010.


I often read here on BikePortland about $5,000 singlespeeds and $6,000 cargo bikes, and I think about a lifetime of used or discarded bikes I’ve fixed up and ridden or resold. I enjoy the lines of a Vanilla or Ahearne or Bullitt as much as the next person, but choosing to live lower on the pecuniary totem pole, that is just not my market.

I’d like to share what the economics of bicycling looks like from my perspective.

Part of the fun of not owning a car is that you avoid all the bills — gas, oil, insurance, parking, and repairs, (not to mention buying the car itself and eventually replacing it) — that come with it. For me, that statistic you read about that suggests the average car-owning household spends around $9,000 per year in car-related expenses, is inconceivable given how our household has chosen to spend money.


Meet Aixe Djelal, the ‘helmetographer’ behind BicycleHead

Posted on June 8th, 2015 at 11:46 am.

All images by Aixe Djelal.

I’m not sure how I stumbled onto the work of Aixe Djelal (pronounced “eye-SHAY ja-LAL”), but now I find myself checking her latest images several times per week. I think it’s the randomness of them, or maybe it’s how she captures the ephemeral vignettes I often see myself but rarely capture.


‘Inspired to Ride’ film to premiere in Portland April 18th

Posted on April 14th, 2015 at 9:07 am.

Nathan Jones from Ride Yr Bike is hosting the Portland premiere of Inspired to Ride, a film about endurance cycling. The big event is at McMenamins Mission Theater (NW 16th and Glisan) on Saturday April 18th and the film’s cast and crew — as well as endurance racing legends Mike Hall and Juliana Buhring — will be in attendance.

On June 7, 2014, forty-five cyclists from around the world set out on the inaugural Trans Am Bike Race, following the famed TransAmerica Trail. Their mission is to cover 4,233 miles in one enormous stage race, traversing through ten states in a transcontinental adventure of epic proportions.


For Blake Hicks, bike tricks are ticket to the big time

Posted on May 3rd, 2013 at 10:58 am.

Blake Hicks at Salmon St Fountain-17-17
Blake Hicks is a fixture in Waterfront Park,
where he can be seen nearly every day
working on his tricks.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

For the past four years, southeast Portland resident Blake Hicks has focused his entire life on two things: Perfect his bike tricks and share them with the world. Now, after countless hours of hard work, the 28-year-old professional performer is about to embark on the biggest summer of his young career.

I first came across Blake’s amazing riding skills in 2006, when I photographed him practicing his moves in Waterfront Park. Yesterday I was riding through the park and there he was again — working on his awe-inspiring, spinning, rolling, and balancing act. And I’m glad I stopped to talk because he’s about to leave for a three-month performance gig at Busch Gardens in Tampa, Florida.


Craigslist post about post-dooring romance inspires film

Posted on April 26th, 2013 at 11:00 am.

Still from Mike Vogel’s Doored.

Remember that awesome Craigslist post last summer when a guy got doored while biking downtown, but instead of being angry at the door-operener he sort of… fell in love?

Well it turns out that Craigslist post was the inspiration one of my favorite movies from the Filmed By Bike festival that wrapped up Tuesday night. Portland-based writer/director Mike Vogel of Front Ave Productions created his short film, Doored – Fractured Skull, Broken Hearts, based on that Craigslist post and it made its debut at the festival.


‘Circle Century’ documents 660 lap, 100-mile ride around Ladd Circle

Posted on April 25th, 2013 at 1:06 pm.

Still from Circle Century.

Southeast Portland resident and hobbyist movie maker Merritt Raitt debuted a new film at Filmed by Bike over the weekend. Circle Century documents his attempt to ride 100 miles, non-stop around Ladd Circle.

Raitt, who lives just a few houses down from the circle, accomplished his feat back in August 2011 but his movie has just now been released to the public. I followed up with Merritt to ask him a bit more about what it was like to ride a 0.15 mile loop of a neighborhood street 660 times without any breaks.