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About Michael Andersen (News Editor)

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Michael Andersen is the half-time news editor of BikePortland.org. He joined the team in May 2013 after three years as publisher of Portland Afoot and is proud to be supporting BikePortland's pursuit of new initiatives. With the other half of his time, he works as the staff writer for The Green Lane Project, a project of bike advocacy group PeopleForBikes that assists and encourages cities in the design of better bike lanes. You can reach him at michael@bikeportland.org or his cell, 503-333-7824.

Michael Andersen (News Editor) Post Archive

As TriMet puts another $2 million into WES, some imagine the bike trail that wasn’t

Thursday, May 26th, 2016
Waiting for WES
WES at Beaverton Transit Center.
(Photo: Thomas Le Ngo)

TriMet’s Westside Express Service commuter rail line, built for the equivalent of $178 million in 2008, is getting some new investment.

The line between Beaverton Transit Center and Wilsonville costs TriMet $135,000 per week to operate and serves something like 900 to 1,000 people per weekday.

That comes out to a cost of $14.83 per boarding in April, compared to $2.68 per boarding of a frequent-service bus line or $2.36 per MAX boarding.

The Oregonian reported Monday that the regional transit agency was agreeing this week to spend another $2 million to buy and retrofit two rail cars from Texas:

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Reform school: PSU will host a free ‘Summer Transportation Institute’ for girls

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016
Sunday-Parkways-SE-2012-3
It’ll be an introduction to transportation careers.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

If you’re a female high schooler with a yen for understanding how cities work and how to help them evolve, Portland State Unviersity has a deal for you.

PSU’s Transportation Research and Education Center is offering its first-ever Summer Transportation Institute, a two-week course designed to introduce young women (rising into grades 9-12) to the possibilities of a career in shaping streets. It’ll be divided between (a) guest lectures from prominent women in Portland’s transportation world and (b) “field tours of Portland’s transportation infrastructure and public spaces.”

Here’s how the course description puts it:

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Bikes and trains: Free meetup at the Green Dragon tonight

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016
Bikes on Amtrak
More Amtrak lines are allowing this.
(Photo: Will Vanlue)

They’re the smallest and the biggest vehicles many people use during their lives, and they keep becoming a better travel pair.

A free event Wednesday evening will bring a rail-riding college student to Portland to talk about various aspects of bicycle-and-train travel.

The latest major improvement on this front in the United States is Amtrak’s expanded roll-on bike service, a 2013 shift by the national passenger rail company that came after years of advocacy from people who saw the potential.

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$8.4 million downtown protected bike lane plans will start this summer, city says

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016
unhappy sw broadway
The door-zone bike lane on Broadway is not very comfortable for most beginning riders.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Among the many projects funded this month by Portland voters is one we first covered in early 2013: a network of protected bike lanes in downtown Portland.

The new local gas tax will send a projected $2.8 million to the project, joining with $6 million in federal funds the project scored in 2013 and $600,000 in other local funds.

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What I learned at the Portland Electric Bike Expo

Monday, May 23rd, 2016
Keola Munos with A2B's heavy-duty lineup.(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Keola Munos with A2B’s heavy-duty lineup.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

As Jonathan wrote on Friday, this weekend’s Electric Bike Expo has been a milestone for Portland, a metro area that offers a rich bike-friendly culture but also has enough hills that many people are effectively shut out of it.

Enter e-bikes. And enter the expo, a free event outside the Lloyd Center movie theater that brought in vendors from around the country. As an e-bike newbie — I’ve written about them plenty but only ridden one before — I spent a few hours there on Saturday to see some of the products and talk to the customers and sellers. Here’s a quick tour of what I found.

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The Monday Roundup: Adhesive cars, driving ethics & more

Monday, May 23rd, 2016
sticky layer
(Image: Google)

This week’s Monday Roundup is sponsored by Hassalo on Eighth, now leasing in the Lloyd District.

Here are the bike-related links from around the world that caught our eyes this week:

Adhesive cars: Google has patented a “sticky layer” to hold people on the hood of self-driving cars after a collision.

Car ethics: Should a robot car choose to kill its driver or a child in front of it? There’s a more fundamental ethical question, says N+1. “Why was the car going so damn fast in the first place?”

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Comment of the Week: Candidate Eudaly on her transportation background

Friday, May 20th, 2016
chloe eudaly
Chloe Eudaly.
(Photo via Eudaly campaign)

We’re always glad to see the subject of a story show up in a comment thread. When the subject of a story happens to be a political candidate on her way to hundreds of thousands of ballots in a few months, that’s even better.

Thursday morning, Portland City Council candidate Chloe Eudaly jumped (politely but authoritatively) into a discussion about her positions on transportation and housing. It was taking place beneath our post about her late surge to make the November runoff against sitting council member and Transportation Commissioner Steve Novick.

Her transportation thoughts are, she admitted, weak on detail so far. But they’re strong on credibility — among other first-rate literary references, they included a story about her time biking around Amsterdam with one of the best-known writers about urban bicycling, “Dishwasher” Pete Jordan.

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OHSU’s Go By Bike Valet has doubled its users in three years

Friday, May 20th, 2016
Go By Bike shop in South Waterfront-23
The valet in 2012. It’s co-funded by OHSU and the private bike shop that operates nearby.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

One of Portland’s most unusual experiments in privately funded bike promotion keeps growing and growing.

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Nowhere to park your bike at Pine Street Market? Help is on the way

Friday, May 20th, 2016

A new market in downtown Portland without bike parking out front? The horror!(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

A new market in downtown Portland without bike parking out front? Say it ain’t so!
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)


Our bike parking coverage is sponsored by Huntco.

Downtown Portland’s most interesting new meal spot could be described as an indoor food cart pod, or maybe a slightly upmarket food court.

But whatever you want to call Pine Street Market, one thing it’s clearly short of is bike parking.

A few weeks ago, when I met a friend there, I resorted to something I’ve never had to do since moving to Portland: locking my bike to the plumbing outside a nearby building.

This is such an odd situation in Portland, which usually excels at commercial bike parking above all else, that it’s been drawing attention:

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Portland is finally adding homes almost as fast as people are moving here

Thursday, May 19th, 2016
pop and housing growth
The population is up 16 percent since 2005, but the number of homes is only up 11 percent.
*The 2010 jump is related to better data from the decennial Census.
Data: American Community Survey. Chart: BikePortland.

After 10 years of falling further and further behind the number of people moving to Portland — and paying the price in rising rents, especially in bikeable areas — Portland nearly kept up with its own migration last year.

That’s according to American Community Survey figures released Thursday, which showed Multnomah County adding 4,688 net new homes in 2015. That’s the most to be reported from this data set since at least 2005, the first year it was available.

Since that year, Multnomah County’s population has grown 59 percent faster than its housing supply. That’s combined with relatively rapid growth in high-wage local jobs to rapidly drive up housing prices.

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